Health & Wellness

Recommend me a psychiatrist? Toronto

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 26th, 2018 6:28 am
[OP]
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Jan 21, 2017
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Recommend me a psychiatrist? Toronto

Hey guys, in light of what happened recently, mental health is definitely something we should all look into. That said, I'm personally going through some stuff. Does anyone have a good psychologist or psychiatrist in downtown Toronto?? Would love to check in on my own mental health and work things out.

BTW I'm also surprised we don't have a health section here on RFD. Maybe we should
29 replies
Deal Fanatic
Jun 11, 2005
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DPR2017 wrote:
Jul 24th, 2018 9:46 am
Hey guys, in light of what happened recently, mental health is definitely something we should all look into. That said, I'm personally going through some stuff. Does anyone have a good psychologist or psychiatrist in downtown Toronto?? Would love to check in on my own mental health and work things out.

BTW I'm also surprised we don't have a health section here on RFD. Maybe we should
I don't have any Doctor recommendation's but large props for realizing you need some help and not turn to drugs or alcohol to solve your issues.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
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Talk to your doctor about getting referred. Usually there's a long wait. If you have health insurance that covers psychology services, that might be something to consider in the interim.
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Why don't you take one course of your choice in psychology at the university level but with no credit? Maybe the title of the course would interest you and actually help you help yourself.

Or you can go visit some psychologist or psychiatrist office and said you just want to take a checklist that they usually give to new patient and just read it yourself.

Or go buy a psychology text book which usually has sample checklist. They may be outdated though.
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Poppwl wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2018 3:55 am
Why don't you take one course of your choice in psychology at the university level but with no credit? Maybe the title of the course would interest you and actually help you help yourself.

Or you can go visit some psychologist or psychiatrist office and said you just want to take a checklist that they usually give to new patient and just read it yourself.

Or go buy a psychology text book which usually has sample checklist. They may be outdated though.
I take it you've never had a mental health issue, or you wouldn't be recommending OP take a course, buy a textbook, or use a checklist.
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amz155 wrote:
Aug 4th, 2018 1:46 pm
I take it you've never had a mental health issue, or you wouldn't be recommending OP take a course, buy a textbook, or use a checklist.
What's wrong with what I have suggested? These stuff are developed by professionals working in the field of psychology.

The OP said the OP want to check on his or her mental health, what's wrong with using a checklist or list of questions that ask you questions like how have you been feeling lately, do you lack energy, do you have no motivation, etc. OP just need to be honest and know how to add and read the answers of the results.

OP is definitely motivated to see how his or her mental health is from the opening post.
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amz155 wrote:
Aug 4th, 2018 1:46 pm
I take it you've never had a mental health issue, or you wouldn't be recommending OP take a course, buy a textbook, or use a checklist.
Isn't a checklist at least a positive step in the right direction? I can't speak for OP but some days it's getting so congested in my head that a checklist is probably a good idea. I've walked out of my house without my keys a few times which is probably the least of my worries these days but signalfies that there's a deeper problem at play than just plain forgetfulness.

If OP feels a checklist is beneficial to them, by all means go and explore that option. It is worth a shot.
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Supercooled wrote:
Aug 4th, 2018 8:17 pm
Isn't a checklist at least a positive step in the right direction? I can't speak for OP but some days it's getting so congested in my head that a checklist is probably a good idea. I've walked out of my house without my keys a few times which is probably the least of my worries these days but signalfies that there's a deeper problem at play than just plain forgetfulness.

If OP feels a checklist is beneficial to them, by all means go and explore that option. It is worth a shot.
The checklists (and they're brief) are used to screen for anxiety and/or depression. The OP has *already* self identified a need to talk to someone. What do you propose that using a checklist will assist with? In your experience with such checklists, how did they help you after you had already acknowledged/identified the problem?
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No I misunderstood the context of a checklist used in this case. I was referring to thrbusae of a checklist to facilitate something that may be ambiguous or get the ball rolling as it were.

As I am trying to undertake my own personal journey towards healing I believe a checklist would be helpful. That's all
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amz155 wrote:
Aug 4th, 2018 11:31 pm
The checklists (and they're brief) are used to screen for anxiety and/or depression. The OP has *already* self identified a need to talk to someone. What do you propose that using a checklist will assist with? In your experience with such checklists, how did they help you after you had already acknowledged/identified the problem?
Sometimes people believe they are worse than they really are. Reading a questionnaire/checklist like that may be a reminder that that person is not doing so bad. From there, that person can look for other resources to get themselves into a better mood instead of talking to the wrong people who don't know what to do.
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Aug 18, 2005
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The family doctor is the first-line access for all of this stuff. Go in, ask for a reference for mental health.
You will get a psychologist reference. Based on the psychologist's assessment, you may get further referred to a psychiatrist.

Psychologists can diagnose conditions but they don't prescribe medications.
Psychiatrists prescribe medications.
Tuition to the School of Life is not tax deductible.
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Jan 2, 2015
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Poppwl wrote:
Aug 5th, 2018 12:56 pm
Sometimes people believe they are worse than they really are. Reading a questionnaire/checklist like that may be a reminder that that person is not doing so bad. From there, that person can look for other resources to get themselves into a better mood instead of talking to the wrong people who don't know what to do.
This is actually quite awful advice. Most people who have mental health challenges actually think they are better than they are, and are often in denial. They think they can just put themselves in a better mood. It is the fact that they don’t know what to do, they they should go and talk to someone. To get to that realization for some is quite an accomplishment, which OP has already done. To tell them to read a book or take a class without any context is not the right answer.

If someone thought they were physically sick, would you tell them to take a course a junior coarse on their illness? No, you would say, please go to the doctor if you have these symptoms, and let some who knows what they are doing help.

I have close people to me that have had mental health issues. There is a large rise in mental health issues in young people these days. My kid in elementary school can name at least 9kidsthat have come out and told them that there are anxiety or depression issues out of the class of 26. I have very close family members that work in the space of youths mental health, and it’s a growning issues. The advice they have given me is that there are early signs and if I am not sure, to bring my kids in and talk to someone. My tween has gone to see a consellor just to check in to make sure things are okay. Most of it is just hormonal turbulent growing up, but havinan outside neutral perspective to tall to has been great. The counsellor isn’t concerned and says that he wishes all parents did this.

I am not an expert, but I have done a lot of research. What my research has shown me is that many people dont get help until it’s really serious. At that point, its a bigger struggle, and the person has been struggling on their own for too long. Why not talk to someone who knows what the are doing, and have them help you decide if something wrong. If nothing is wrong, then will give some strategies and reassurance. If something is wrong, having that outside view is very helpful.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
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Macx2mommy wrote:
Aug 5th, 2018 1:43 pm
This is actually quite awful advice. Most people who have mental health challenges actually think they are better than they are, and are often in denial. They think they can just put themselves in a better mood. It is the fact that they don’t know what to do, they they should go and talk to someone. To get to that realization for some is quite an accomplishment, which OP has already done. To tell them to read a book or take a class without any context is not the right answer.

If someone thought they were physically sick, would you tell them to take a course a junior coarse on their illness? No, you would say, please go to the doctor if you have these symptoms, and let some who knows what they are doing help.

I have close people to me that have had mental health issues. There is a large rise in mental health issues in young people these days. My kid in elementary school can name at least 9kidsthat have come out and told them that there are anxiety or depression issues out of the class of 26. I have very close family members that work in the space of youths mental health, and it’s a growning issues. The advice they have given me is that there are early signs and if I am not sure, to bring my kids in and talk to someone. My tween has gone to see a consellor just to check in to make sure things are okay. Most of it is just hormonal turbulent growing up, but havinan outside neutral perspective to tall to has been great. The counsellor isn’t concerned and says that he wishes all parents did this.

I am not an expert, but I have done a lot of research. What my research has shown me is that many people dont get help until it’s really serious. At that point, its a bigger struggle, and the person has been struggling on their own for too long. Why not talk to someone who knows what the are doing, and have them help you decide if something wrong. If nothing is wrong, then will give some strategies and reassurance. If something is wrong, having that outside view is very helpful.
Some who say they need help will be able to find help. The help does not need to be a professional. In fact, sometimes when a professional identify a potential client as 'low risk' ,they may refer them to students and those students are may not be helpful and may make matter worse. How would you feel, if you go seek help and feel like the help is no help at all? Would you keep trying to find professional help. it is really hit and miss.
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Reading a textbook on psychology might be better because it is long and written by many people. You may read a chapter and see statistic gathered for people in similar age group experiencing the same things and feel less alone. You will also learn the different ways "mental health" is perceived. It is also a productive use of time.

The reader will feel like they learned something new. A textbook is a well-vented source, as it should be.

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