Fashion & Apparel

Redflag Hardshell Jacket Discussion

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 20th, 2017 1:22 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 7, 2017
142 posts
99 upvotes
Hamilton

Redflag Hardshell Jacket Discussion

Since we have dozens of threads on parkas, I thought it would be cool to have a place to talk about hardshell jackets with Gore-Tex/Dry Vent/h2No fabrics like what Arc'teryx is well known for.

While the current trend in most Canadian cities is to buy a down parka, some have said that it is a much smarter buy to invest that money in a water resistant hardshell. You can use that same jacket for the fall and spring and add layers - even a down layer to simulate a parka if you'd like- as needed. I'd love to hear what everyone is using for the winter!

For those hunting for a hardshell, I've found this website to be a great resource: https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/c ... ell-jacket
20 replies
Newbie
Mar 1, 2017
84 posts
16 upvotes
For the gear obsessed, there is not one jacket for all solutions. That said, a layering system with a quality waterproof/breathable jacket is a very smart place to start.
differing wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 1:19 pm
Since we have dozens of threads on parkas, I thought it would be cool to have a place to talk about hardshell jackets with Gore-Tex/Dry Vent/h2No fabrics like what Arc'teryx is well known for.

While the current trend in most Canadian cities is to buy a down parka, some have said that it is a much smarter buy to invest that money in a water resistant hardshell. You can use that same jacket for the fall and spring and add layers - even a down layer to simulate a parka if you'd like- as needed. I'd love to hear what everyone is using for the winter!

For those hunting for a hardshell, I've found this website to be a great resource: https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/c ... ell-jacket
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
11024 posts
1523 upvotes
City of Vancouver
It's winter out. U r going to see The Nutcracker ballet with ur date. What r u going to wear?
De gustibus non est disputandum
Crazy people will make even sane people crazy.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
11024 posts
1523 upvotes
City of Vancouver
It's a blizzard outside. U r wearing ur hardshell. What r ur knees wearing?
De gustibus non est disputandum
Crazy people will make even sane people crazy.
Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4524 posts
247 upvotes
Becks wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 6:03 pm
It's a blizzard outside. U r wearing ur hardshell. What r ur knees wearing?
Pants?

I've never owned a coat that covered my knees and I have never felt the need for one. They look super uncomfortable!
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 7, 2017
142 posts
99 upvotes
Hamilton
Becks wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 2:23 pm
It's winter out. U r going to see The Nutcracker ballet with ur date. What r u going to wear?
My CG parka so that I can show off all my money duhhh
Face With Tears Of Joy

But seriously, when Uniqlo hits BC grab some heat tech tights... You'll never worry about your cold knees again.
Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4524 posts
247 upvotes
differing wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 6:33 pm
My CG parka so that I can show off all my money duhhh
Face With Tears Of Joy

But seriously, when Uniqlo hits BC grab some heat tech tights... You'll never worry about your cold knees again.
I heard Uniqlo recommended for cheaper technical gear on a travel podcast today. Any other items they're known for or that you'd recommend? I've never even been in one of their stores before lol.
Jr. Member
Mar 13, 2017
118 posts
85 upvotes
differing wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 1:19 pm
Since we have dozens of threads on parkas, I thought it would be cool to have a place to talk about hardshell jackets with Gore-Tex/Dry Vent/h2No fabrics like what Arc'teryx is well known for.

While the current trend in most Canadian cities is to buy a down parka, some have said that it is a much smarter buy to invest that money in a water resistant hardshell. You can use that same jacket for the fall and spring and add layers - even a down layer to simulate a parka if you'd like- as needed. I'd love to hear what everyone is using for the winter!

For those hunting for a hardshell, I've found this website to be a great resource: https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/c ... ell-jacket
A few years ago I switched from wearing a thick Columbia winter jacket to a layering system. Really glad I did so - it's much easier to stay temperate, even indoors.

One of the most important things is the baselayer - merino wool works great. Then an insulating layer (synthethic or down works) and then a shell for wind resistance.

I don't think jacket brands make that much different (with respect to material) but it's important to have a good fit. BTW my experience with Goretex is good in winter but doesn't breath well when the temperatures go up.

Layering system works great.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 7, 2017
142 posts
99 upvotes
Hamilton
amz155 wrote: I heard Uniqlo recommended for cheaper technical gear on a travel podcast today. Any other items they're known for or that you'd recommend? I've never even been in one of their stores before lol.
Haven't bought too much of their technical stuff, but their airism underwear is great for the summer. I really like their socks; they have the only no-show socks that actually stay on my feet. I actually went for a run with their heat tech socks the other night and my feet felt great!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 29, 2008
1670 posts
392 upvotes
North York
Uniqlo Heattech with layers or CG and etc.
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2008
831 posts
139 upvotes
I'm curious, i've heard this mentioned on other forums, but is delamination inevitable in goretex products?

I ask because i purchased the Arcteryx Alpha SV in Summer 2014. I wear the shell very little during the winter/spring, i'd say 40 times a year, as i tend to live in my Atom hoodies. But by the time Spring 2016 came around, i noticed delamination in various areas, like the hood, the shoulders, chest, inside parts that touch my face. I am not rough on the jacket, my main use is walking around the city, no hiking/winter sports at all. At this time i'd estimate, i had worn this jacket about 60-70 times max. Warranty was a breeze and they told me to choose anything, which is a nice fallback. But i am concerned that it will happen again. It seems like a life span of less than 2 years is very low and concerning for a product that has a reputation to be long lasting.

Some hypothesized that it may be skin type that causes delamination faster. So i wonder if it is because of me.
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2006
670 posts
82 upvotes
Pickering
Becks wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 2:23 pm
It's winter out. U r going to see The Nutcracker ballet with ur date. What r u going to wear?
The name's Terry Tibbs, I've had hardshell jackets in my family for generations mate.
Jr. Member
Jan 12, 2009
142 posts
28 upvotes
Good info so far.

Outdoorgearlab is a fairly good guide, and nice intro to hardshells. Definitely you need to evaluate your needs as mentioned earlier. That said, a decent hardshell, solid mid layer (fleece/puffy etc) and good baselayer (sized in conjunction) can cover a lot of temp and precipitation conditions.

Some will argue you can go with a windshirt or softshell if you're working hard, best method is experimentation. Many companies are now pushing breathable insulation (Polartec Alpha and Patagonia Nano Air) and softshells where you need some wind resistance without heavy wind/water protection.

Gore-Tex vs EVent vs others: long battle online, you can read up if you like to get into the weeds.

For thicker hardshells, I find pit-zips very helpful to ventilate.

For hardshells, DWR is your friend. Tumble dry and it helps restore/activate the DWR treatment.

For outdoor employees/first responders, there are often really good discounts available (e.g. Outdoor Research, Black Diamond, MEC). Take a look online and instore.

Warranties: For Arc'teryx and Patagonia, note that you can save on some shipping by bringing into the corporate stores. Some RFDers have reported they can just drop off there versus shipping back to the companies.

UNIQLO is a very good budget option. Some Eddie Bauer is also ok, but you need to do your research. Mountain Equipment Co-op is also fairly reliable, although I have noticed a shift in how they market and the level of expertise.

If you do not mind limited colours, military surplus layers on Ebay etc. can be extremely cost effective if you do your research. Some big outdoor companies have produced items that are based on their commercial line, that can be yours for a fraction of the price.

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