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Renovating bathroom with Bath Fitter - any thoughts?

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  • Dec 3rd, 2007 11:11 am
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Member
Aug 18, 2005
333 posts
21 upvotes

Renovating bathroom with Bath Fitter - any thoughts?

I'm thinking of renovating my bathroom (new tub and surrounding wall) with Bath Fitter.

I don't have loads and loads of money to spend, so I am definitely on a budget.

Are there any HUGE disadvantages with going through a company like Bath Fitter where they just put the stuff over the existing structures?

Again, definitely on a tight budget b/c we'll probably need to get a new furnace real soon (love those government rebates!).
5 replies
Deal Addict
Nov 18, 2005
4037 posts
598 upvotes
Kitchener
they charge from $2000 to $3000. If you're handy you can replace the tub, surround, and faucets yourself for around $1000
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 13, 2005
5669 posts
161 upvotes
GTA
kevin_ wrote:
Dec 2nd, 2007 10:28 pm
I'm thinking of renovating my bathroom (new tub and surrounding wall) with Bath Fitter.

I don't have loads and loads of money to spend, so I am definitely on a budget.

Are there any HUGE disadvantages with going through a company like Bath Fitter where they just put the stuff over the existing structures?

Again, definitely on a tight budget b/c we'll probably need to get a new furnace real soon (love those government rebates!).
I had them do my old place because i didn't want to deal with the tiles on the wall and the plaster that they they were stuck to. IN the end, they did a pretty nice job. I had the location on Arrow Road, just south of finch do it. Took the guy all day, but when he was done, it looked good with no leaks!!!! Depending on what extra's you put in, budget around $3-$4k.

sk
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1918 posts
9 upvotes
KELOWNA
I think they are a really good alternative when you can't or don't want to do a bathroom reno. It's a real mess to replace a tub in a typical bathroom because you have to get the old tub out. That means cutting the walls and floor around it not to mention any maneuvering through the house to dispose of it. It's putting that floor and wall back in some decent shape that presents the problems.

I replaced the tub in this house and can tell you it cost me $400 for the plumber to remove and install a tub and that didn't include new fixtures or the price of the tub. Add new floor which I am doing myself but there's still another $350+ just in materials. Add new cement board (for shower walls) and tiles/materials and there goes another pile of money (I was quoted $2000 up to $5000 in Calgary's inflated market just to prep & tile around that new tub, ~75 sq ft).

The big issue is time and effort. For the same money as Bathfitters you can DIY your bathroom which takes as long as it takes but count on at least a week if you are average skill level. It's also a lot of work. Bathfitters are done in a day while you sip a coffee, you wave bye, and get on with things.

The down side is some people don't think they are the best option visually, but really, the new options they have are very nice and every bit the same kind of thing that is installed in new homes. They are also water tight which is not something tiling can offer without being very careful.
[OP]
Member
Aug 18, 2005
333 posts
21 upvotes
Dustbunny wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2007 10:04 am
I think they are a really good alternative when you can't or don't want to do a bathroom reno. It's a real mess to replace a tub in a typical bathroom because you have to get the old tub out. That means cutting the walls and floor around it not to mention any maneuvering through the house to dispose of it. It's putting that floor and wall back in some decent shape that presents the problems.

I replaced the tub in this house and can tell you it cost me $400 for the plumber to remove and install a tub and that didn't include new fixtures or the price of the tub. Add new floor which I am doing myself but there's still another $350+ just in materials. Add new cement board (for shower walls) and tiles/materials and there goes another pile of money (I was quoted $2000 up to $5000 in Calgary's inflated market just to prep & tile around that new tub, ~75 sq ft).

The big issue is time and effort. For the same money as Bathfitters you can DIY your bathroom which takes as long as it takes but count on at least a week if you are average skill level. It's also a lot of work. Bathfitters are done in a day while you sip a coffee, you wave bye, and get on with things.

The down side is some people don't think they are the best option visually, but really, the new options they have are very nice and every bit the same kind of thing that is installed in new homes. They are also water tight which is not something tiling can offer without being very careful.
Thanks Dustbunny. I'm definitely leaning towards going with Bath Fitters now.

One of my original worries was whether or not having something installed over the old structures would be a problem in the future (i.e. moisture buildup/mildew/decay) from the old stuff under the new stuff. There's currently a fair bit of mildew buildup on the grout between the wall tiles around the tub.

But I guess that should be okay if these things are water tight?
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1918 posts
9 upvotes
KELOWNA
You'd have to talk with Bathfitters, but I imagine you have to take care of any existing problems like mildew and mold prior to sealing it over. They have probably seen it all before so would know if it's a big deal or not.
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