Real Estate

Rent increase at 50%

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 16th, 2017 11:41 am
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Deal Guru
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Nov 15, 2004
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LongLiveRFD wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:19 pm
Nope. Check again. If this assumption of yours failed, your whole point would fail.
Assuming it's successful.
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:20 pm
Assuming it's successful.
Nope. You are still mistaken.
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:18 pm
If the landlord evicts the tenant using the reason that he's going to be living in the property he rents, the tenant won't be living there and paying rent while the landlord is there. No rental income.
No rental incomeSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling Eyes $1000 x 12 = $12000 max
He would loose, but profits $50,000 in next 10 years

If tenant goes out and pay current rate, he would pay $216,000 in the next 10 years

If negotiated, he would pay $180,000 in the next 10 years
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Lavaris wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:19 pm
Lol

Getting to know different perspectives...

May OP not take your advice and jeopardise the situation.

Landlord still didnot serve him notice, he asked what he wants straight forward.
Now its tenant turn to offer other price or pay or approach LTB.
You still seem to be under the impression that there are equal stakes here. The landlord's current move is illegal and it's going to get slapped down hard because the law is new and they're going to be looking to make examples of people who try to break it. The OP is just an honest citizen who's doing his part and reporting a violation of the law.

Since you seem to be unfamiliar with the law in Ontario let me break down a few things for you:
1) Rent can only be increased by the regulated amount this year unless the LTB gives permission for an increase above that. The landlord can't increase it further without that permission.
2) Nobody can force you to sign a new lease if your current one has ended and you're going month-to-month
3) The landlord can't evict the OP unless his reasons for doing so fall under very specific scenarios that also require LTB permission.

All the OP has to do is just toss the letter in the trash, pay the regulated rate this year instead of what the landlord is asking, and then wait for the landlord to try something stupid. The landlord knows the law and is the only one trying to make things difficult for himself here.
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
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LongLiveRFD wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:21 pm
Nope. You are still mistaken.
Explain to me how I'm mistaken. If the landlord manages to successfully evict the tenant then how will he still be receiving rental income from the tenant?
Lavaris wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:23 pm
No rental incomeSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling Eyes $1000 x 12 = $12000 max
He would loose, but profits $50,000 in next 10 years

If tenant goes out and pay current rate, he would pay $216,000 in the next 10 years
And as I've said before, this is a choice the landlord has to make, not the tenant. I omitted the last line there because there is no negotiation option here.
This would fall under the 'forcing the tenant to sign a new lease' option that's specifically banned in Ontario.
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
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Jun 15, 2017
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:26 pm
You still seem to be under the impression that there are equal stakes here. The landlord's current move is illegal and it's going to get slapped down hard because the law is new and they're going to be looking to make examples of people who try to break it. The OP is just an honest citizen who's doing his part and reporting a violation of the law.

Since you seem to be unfamiliar with the law in Ontario let me break down a few things for you:
1) Rent can only be increased by the regulated amount this year unless the LTB gives permission for an increase above that. The landlord can't increase it further without that permission.
2) Nobody can force you to sign a new lease if your current one has ended and you're going month-to-month
3) The landlord can't evict the OP unless his reasons for doing so fall under very specific scenarios that also require LTB permission.

All the OP has to do is just toss the letter in the trash, pay the regulated rate this year instead of what the landlord is asking, and then wait for the landlord to try something stupid. The landlord knows the law and is the only one trying to make things difficult for himself here.
I give up, not because cannot argue but because you seem to be not knowing negotiation.

If landlord knows rules as per you, why would he do that stupid way, even if he dont serve notice now, he will serve notice after few months, if he loose at LTB, he would evict because tenant took him to LTB.

Negotiation.....
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:27 pm
Explain to me how I'm mistaken. If the landlord manages to successfully evict the tenant then how will he still be receiving rental income from the tenant?



And as I've said before, this is a choice the landlord has to make, not the tenant. I omitted the last line there because there is no negotiation option here.
This would fall under the 'forcing the tenant to sign a new lease' option that's specifically banned in Ontario.
Check LTB site. All rules are captured in nice forms and instructions how to fill it. Show me where it says no income.

This is where tenants/landlords can chose the suboptimal outcomes given their circumstances.
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Lavaris wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:30 pm
I give up, not because cannot argue but because you seem to be not knowing negotiation.

If landlord knows rules as per you, why would he do that stupid way, even if he dont serve notice now, he will serve notice after few months, if he loose at LTB, he would evict because tenant took him to LTB.

Negotiation.....
I'm getting bored of this too. Canada isn't a third world country and negotiation over the law doesn't fly here. The law is the law. Follow it or face the consequences, those are the only two options. People with the mindset you have are pretty much the reason the rent control law was expanded, and it'll be interesting to see the LTB crack down on those who still think they can violate it whenever they feel like.
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:33 pm
I'm getting bored of this too. Canada isn't a third world country and negotiation over the law doesn't fly here. The law is the law. Follow it or face the consequences, those are the only two options. People with the mindset you have are pretty much the reason the rent control law was expanded, and it'll be interesting to see the LTB crack down on those who still think they can violate it whenever they feel like.
Despite of popular belief, the RTA protects all parties and goes both way.

The hole in your arguement is to think landlords have no rights, and the number of technicalities informed landlords or tenants could take on unsuspecting landlords or tenants.

In civilized first world, that kind of thinking will lead to excess amount of disputes. Unless you know the law down cold, don't assume superiority over human nature.
Last edited by LongLiveRFD on Oct 12th, 2017 8:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Piro21 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:33 pm
I'm getting bored of this too. Canada isn't a third world country and negotiation over the law doesn't fly here. The law is the law. Follow it or don't, those are the only two options. People with the mindset you have are pretty much the reason the rent control law was expanded, and it'll be interesting to see the LTB crack down on those who still think they can violate it whenever they feel like.
Lol, judging me..Smiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling Eyes and third world countres ..... lol

I always charged rent well below market price and sometimes no increase

So you are saying there is no negotiation in Canads??

But how come i saw following scenarios in Canada or in USA.


1. CRA charges some guys some penalty according to rules and tax payer negotiates to pay less or takes time to pay.
2. How come there is bankcruptcy guy negotiating to pay less? To clear his credit report.
3. When a hospital in USA charges hefty bill accordingto rule and patient or his family negotiates for way below less price?
4. When a mobile company charges hefty bill for internet roaming as per rule, sometimes customer unaware and by mistake its happened,
How come mobile company charges 50% less?
5. Many other scenarios to explain about negotiation..hard to type in.
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if landlord has been good over the years then just negotiate to an amount that both party agrees to. why in the word would either side get a 3rd party involved? more stress than it need to be.
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mingyang wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:46 pm
if landlord has been good over the years then just negotiate to an amount that both party agrees to. why in the word would either side get a 3rd party involved? more stress than it need to be.
Because few guys dont know there is such thing called negotiation exists...
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Jan 16, 2009
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LongLiveRFD wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:41 pm
Despite of popular belief, the RTA protects all parties and goes both way.

The hole in your arguement is to think landlords has no rights, and the number of technicalities informed landlords or tenants could take on unsuspecting landlords or tenants.

In civilized first world, that kind of thinking will lead to excess amount of disputes. Unless you know the law down cold, don't assume superiority over human nature.
The landlord right is to continue getting the rent at the current rate or risk a year of rental income and hope he can a equally good tenant at higher rate at long term.

Either way, it is worse than getting increase rent from existing tenant so why would op go with it when he can either stay paying the current rent rate or get a month of rent for free moving.

You landlords here with the negotiations suggestions make me laugh. The new law is precisely to prevent landlords like you guys to evict tenant for higher rent/sales of the unit.

That's why landlord pay one months of rent to move in and cap rent increase to 2% through ltb.
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Lavaris wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:47 pm
Because few guys dont know there is such thing called negotiation exists...
That's basically it. If grown adults can't sort things out themselves, then govt assigned a time and place for real adults to provide parenting services to show them how to act like adults.
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Lavaris wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 8:44 pm
Lol, judging me..Smiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling EyesSmiling Face With Smiling Eyes and third world countres ..... lol

I always charged rent well below market price and sometimes no increase

So you are saying there is no negotiation in Canads??

But how come i saw following scenarios in Canada or in USA.


1. CRA charges some guys some penalty according to rules and tax payer negotiates to pay less or takes time to pay.
2. How come there is bankcruptcy guy negotiating to pay less? To clear his credit report.
3. When a hospital in USA charges hefty bill accordingto rule and patient or his family negotiates for way below less price?
4. When a mobile company charges hefty bill for internet roaming as per rule, sometimes customer unaware and by mistake its happened,
How come mobile company charges 50% less?
5. Many other scenarios to explain about negotiation..hard to type in.
There is no incentive for tenant to negotiate because he either gets no rent increase or a month of free rent.

If landlord then serve a n12, negotiation can happen to get more than one month of rent to allow landlord to rent quicker instead of waiting a while year.

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