Home & Garden

Replacing lawn between houses w/ concrete--potential issues?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 13th, 2018 9:28 am
25 replies
Newbie
Mar 6, 2011
52 posts
25 upvotes
Ajax, ON
I would get more quotes from other vendors if you’re unsure about the cost. They should be able to advise you on the potential issues based on what they see.
Banned
Mar 13, 2018
1385 posts
665 upvotes
Don't do concrete as it's not permeable and water will just sheet off

You can do stones, wood chips or other permeable paver.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 24, 2016
580 posts
405 upvotes
ON
How about laying down a geotextile fabric to prevent weed growth along with decorative stone like river rocks or 3/4" clear gravel which is a drainage stone.
Isn't it great to live in the 21st century where deleting history has become more important than making it.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
14203 posts
3542 upvotes
London
EliteJay wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 1:14 am
Hmm what do you mean the concrete could shift? It should be similar to a concrete driveway.
We considered gravel and stones but thought it looked a bit messy especially if weeds start growing.
..
Image

Builders have a bad reputation for packing down the soil beside a basement wall. This allows the soil to settle down several inches over the years. If you pour concrete, the slab could tilt towards one house or the other dumping all the rain water against one basement wall or the other (or bow so there's a huge puddle between the houses)
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2011
990 posts
654 upvotes
HAMILTON
with dirt/grass the rain, snow melt, etc leave someplace for the water to go. With concrete, you are simply creating another problem with water run off.

Spend a little bit of time, dig it up and put down some new sod so that it looks nice and mow it once in a while. It is not a large area to devote a little bit of time to.

Don't further increase the concrete jungle.
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2011
990 posts
654 upvotes
HAMILTON
with dirt/grass the rain, snow melt, etc leave someplace for the water to go. With concrete, you are simply creating another problem with water run off.

Spend a little bit of time, dig it up and put down some new sod so that it looks nice and mow it once in a while. It is not a large area to devote a little bit of time to.

Don't further increase the concrete jungle.
Deal Addict
Jul 3, 2017
3860 posts
2763 upvotes
It's likely that grass will never grow very well in the narrow canyon between tightly-spaced city houses, but don't use concrete. It's environmentally unfriendly, causes runoff problems, and starts looking pretty ugly when it inevitably shifts and cracks. Put down a permeable landscaping barrier to prevent weed growth, then gravel and paving stones. You will have to do some maintenance to prevent weed growth in the dust that inevitably accumulates in the gravel, but it's not much of a burden. It will look way better than concrete.
Sr. Member
May 2, 2011
920 posts
180 upvotes
Oakville, ON
+1 for the river rock suggestion. Concrete is expensive and you will constantly have a drainage issue. You both likely have downspouts draining to that area. Where would the water go? During the winter it would likely freeze and create a skating lane between your houses.
Deal Addict
Feb 5, 2009
2809 posts
922 upvotes
Newmarket
I will also advise against the concrete, water issues, if not done properly shifting and cracking, expensive.

The best option is landscaping fabric covered with some kind of rocks, water has place to run off, much cheaper especially if you roll up your sleeves and do it yourself. Since the space is narrow it doesn't get much sun the growth will be minimal, I believe the plant growth can be further reduced by putting crushed limestone (although I may be wrong here). I had a similar solution between our houses, it takes very little maintenance, just pulling few weeds few times in the season.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 16, 2008
6827 posts
1765 upvotes
Maple
+1. I did my side with neighbour 15 years ago. Many other neighbours followed. With garden fabrics (best 2 layers), rocks and some works, it cost us less than $300 combined.
Homerhomer wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 12:00 pm
I will also advise against the concrete, water issues, if not done properly shifting and cracking, expensive.

The best option is landscaping fabric covered with some kind of rocks, water has place to run off, much cheaper especially if you roll up your sleeves and do it yourself. Since the space is narrow it doesn't get much sun the growth will be minimal, I believe the plant growth can be further reduced by putting crushed limestone (although I may be wrong here). I had a similar solution between our houses, it takes very little maintenance, just pulling few weeds few times in the season.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
4055 posts
781 upvotes
Aurora
My parents did this, it looks ridiculous.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 23, 2008
8937 posts
5228 upvotes
Toronto (Markham)
Use stones or something similar for water permeability. You don't want rain water or snow melt to pool and then run up against the concrete foundation.
Tis banana is IRIE :razz:

10% off is cold, 50% off is warm, 75% off is hot, but FREE IS RFD!

Top