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Repooc's Dedicated Home Theater Build

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 6th, 2018 12:10 am
[OP]
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PROJECT UPDATE!!!

Ceiling/bulkheads are all framed up, stuffed with insulation and resilient channel installed. The bottom extension/ledge of the lighting cove has been installed. Now, all that remains are the uprights affixed to edge of the extension ledge, so that you don't actually see the LED light strip from below.

But the first layer of drywall has been installed, up until where my projector mount is going to be installed today.

Also the subfloor has been installed (landscape fabric, delta FL, tapcon'd OSB) in preparation for building the rear seating riser and then eventually carpet


This first shot was taken with me lying on the floor (in the baffle wall space) looking up towards the back of the theater. For some reason, perhaps the lighting/shadows, the "steps" of the lighting cove look angled/trapazoidal in shape... this is definitely not the case, in reality, they are dead straight and run parallel towards the back of the room. The bulkhead on the right contains a main HVAC trunk, and the bulkhead on the left was built as a faux/empty soffit to match the dimensions of the real bulkhead. In the end, I'm SUPER pleased how this is turning out so far. It almost looks like the ceiling you'd find in the captains deck of a space ship. I can't wait to get it all lit up in different colours.
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ceiling.jpg
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lighting cove.jpg
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Here's a good shot of the Chief projection mount assembled before it gets mounted into the ceiling joist cavity, never to be seen again. All that will be visible in the room is the bottom receiver plate that attaches to the projector. it's going to sit flush with the ceiling.
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chief mount.jpg
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And this is how it's being mounted in the joist cavity... the angled isolation clips will help reduce any vibrations from foot falls on the first floor above or when the subs really get going in the HT
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Projector Mount.jpg
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Here's another shot of the HT from the exterior.... you can see how the exterior foundation wall has been insulated and the resilient channel installed on the 3 interior partition walls.
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exterior.jpg
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And another view of the resilient channel from in side the HT.... looking towards the back of the room, and the finished subfloor
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res channel back.jpg
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Dec 11, 2004
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I would install some bassshaker in the seats rather than have 2 subwoofers.
Or build a platform for the seatings and install that in there.

I have 2x AuraSound AST-2B-4 Pro Bass Shaker Tactile Transducer connected to a dual TPA3116 ("100W" BTL per channel) powered by a 200W 24V Delta PSU, shakers are rated 50W RMS each and it's amazing.

Oh and I have it connected to the LFE channel only but one could of course route all bass to it (<40hz)
[OP]
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Daijoubu wrote:
Feb 16th, 2018 12:41 pm
I would install some bassshaker in the seats rather than have 2 subwoofers.
Or build a platform for the seatings and install that in there.

I have 2x AuraSound AST-2B-4 Pro Bass Shaker Tactile Transducer connected to a dual TPA3116 ("100W" BTL per channel) powered by a 200W 24V Delta PSU, shakers are rated 50W RMS each and it's amazing.

Oh and it's only for the LFE channel
I plan on having both! ;)

2 subwooofers and tactile transducers under each seat.

The only thing I haven't planned for is 4D motion seating...like D-box. I considered it for about 5 minutes. And then the reality of maintaining those motors sank in.
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Mar 15, 2005
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Daijoubu wrote:
Feb 16th, 2018 12:41 pm
I would install some bassshaker in the seats rather than have 2 subwoofers.
Or build a platform for the seatings and install that in there.

I have 2x AuraSound AST-2B-4 Pro Bass Shaker Tactile Transducer connected to a dual TPA3116 ("100W" BTL per channel) powered by a 200W 24V Delta PSU, shakers are rated 50W RMS each and it's amazing.

Oh and I have it connected to the LFE channel only but one could of course route all bass to it (<40hz)
While Tacktile Transducers cause your chairs (and butt) to shake a bit and do add a nice effect, they can't do the fun stuff, like cause your chest to cave in and fillings to fall out - which only decent subwoofers can do. :) They actually change the pressure in an enclosed room. Thats why sealing the room and a door is so important, the pressure has nowhere to go, and your body will shake without the need for transducers.

I was thinking tho, with the sound absorbtion caused by the green glue / hat channel / flexible brackets - would the flexible walls negatively impact the OOMPH caused by the sound waves/air movement ?
[OP]
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discoblues wrote:
Feb 16th, 2018 5:03 pm
While Tacktile Transducers cause your chairs (and butt) to shake a bit and do add a nice effect, they can't do the fun stuff, like cause your chest to cave in and fillings to fall out - which only decent subwoofers can do. :) They actually change the pressure in an enclosed room. Thats why sealing the room and a door is so important, the pressure has nowhere to go, and your body will shake without the need for transducers.

I was thinking tho, with the sound absorbtion caused by the green glue / hat channel / flexible brackets - would the flexible walls negatively impact the OOMPH caused by the sound waves/air movement ?
Well said! Tactile transducers are definitely no replacement for quality subwoofers... And vice-versa. They offer 2 completely different sensory experiences. Hence why havinf both lend themselves to a truly immersive experience.

In regards to the "oomph" in a sound dampened room, i really don't think those wall treatments will affect the internal 'feeling' you get from the low frequency/pressurization as an occupant within the space. You just won't get the reflected sound of the walls per se as those will be somewhat absorbed, so you end up feeling the raw power of the speaker alone.

You can always over compensate for any losses by getting more or bigger subs :)
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All I can say I'm very jealous. :P amazing setup.
[OP]
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So, I'm beginning to reconsider the design of my riser for the back row of seats...
My original design was really just a platform construcred with 2x10 boards, filling the voids with insulation, and then adding osb sheets to close it up... And carpeting it, of course.

Doing a bit more reading/research... It looks like this riser might be able to do double duty for elevating my seats AND act as a bass trap to add tactile feedback to those seats... Meaning that I wouldn't have to buy powered tactile transducers for those seats.

Thing is, there's so many schools of thought in how to execute this correctly and not having it result big reverberation mess.... Really down to volume within the riser and how air passes through the "chambers".

I think what I may end up doing is constructing thr exterior frame with 2x10 boards and the stringers withing built with 2x8 boards... Allowing air to move freely across the joist chambers. Still filling the joists with insulation, i'll go one step further to drill 2" holes in the front face of the riser and cover those with carpet.

Gonna mull this idea over for the next 2 days and then give my final plan to my contractor on Tuesday.

Anybody have any experience building HT risers that double as tactile transducers?
Member
Mar 15, 2005
352 posts
98 upvotes
Curious about this riser bass trap you're planning. While I've heard of people turning risers into bass traps, I've never heard of the ability for it to become a passive resonator / transducer. Do you have any threads on this you can share?

Also regarding where you're putting the holes for the riser... don't most have holes in the top corners covered by floor vents to eliminate the standing waves in the corners?

Edit:
Or you can forgo the risers/traps and install these! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/42 ... vice-under
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discoblues wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 8:12 am
Curious about this riser bass trap you're planning. While I've heard of people turning risers into bass traps, I've never heard of the ability for it to become a passive resonator / transducer. Do you have any threads on this you can share?

Also regarding where you're putting the holes for the riser... don't most have holes in the top corners covered by floor vents to eliminate the standing waves in the corners?

Edit:
Or you can forgo the risers/traps and install these! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/42 ... vice-under
OP said he looked into D-BOX but the AC motors needs maintenance from the sounds of it (plus you need the D-BOX HEMC box and subscription to download the motion code specific to your movie, etc)
So he wanted to just install bass shaker but if the risers can be turned into bass traps, then shakers won't even be necessery.
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Mar 15, 2005
352 posts
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Daijoubu wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 3:03 pm
but if the risers can be turned into bass traps, then shakers won't even be necessery.
Generally bass traps are filled with insulation. When the sound travels through the insulation it gets dissipated as heat due to the friction of the sound waves travelling through the insulation. Yes, in theory you can dissipate the sound another way, ie turning the riser into a giant passive resonator. I've had subs in the past with passive resonators as part of the enclosure. , while he resonators themselves were very firm material and moved about alot, they had almost as much give as the woofer cone itself. However I was wondering how the riser can move enough to simulate a powered tactile transducer if it was built as a solid structure with only a few holes in the front. (especially if it doesn't have any flexible parts to it like my old subs passive resonators.)

I did find a couple of articles that mentioned acheiving this but not filling the riser with much insulation, but you have to be very careful because if you don't get it right you could cause terrible amounts of reverb making certain frequencies sound awful.

Oh and I was totally joking about the dbox kickstarter thing ;)
Last edited by discoblues on Feb 19th, 2018 5:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Jul 14, 2012
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Hamilton
First off, awesome thread. Building a dedicated HT with the budget you're putting behind it is beyond the reach of lot people (myself included). I mean 30k on a projector...never, even if I had the money I don't think I'd get that one passed the wife. Combining the budget with the pre-planning/research you've put in and taking pics every step of the way, really takes it from a potentially "meh" thread to a definite subscribe thread for me.

Second, are you sure the room is big enough, specifically the length? Seems like you're going to be really close to a screen of that size. I know the recommended sitting distance is shorter with 4k vs. 1080, but the front row looks like its about 3-4 ft from your 128" screen. Seems REALLY close to me. Could you not cover up the windows and extend it all the way to the back wall?

Third, someone has already mentioned it, but DIY speakers seems like a recipe for regret in my opinion. I will be the first to admit that I know nothing about them, and you've clearly done your research, so I'm guessing you have your reasons. My opinion is that speaker companies spend a crap load of money to take the guess work out of the equation, and DIY seems to put it right back in.

Either way thanks, great job so far.
Looking forward to the rest of the thread.
"...I started playing porn REALLY loud with speakers facing my back yard. The kids stopped going out back after the parents heard that."
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 6, 2005
3515 posts
894 upvotes
Toronto
discoblues wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 8:12 am
Curious about this riser bass trap you're planning. While I've heard of people turning risers into bass traps, I've never heard of the ability for it to become a passive resonator / transducer. Do you have any threads on this you can share?

Also regarding where you're putting the holes for the riser... don't most have holes in the top corners covered by floor vents to eliminate the standing waves in the corners?

Edit:
Or you can forgo the risers/traps and install these! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/42 ... vice-under
Its a bit of a slippery slope heading down this path, but the reward is far greater than the risk, for me... but combining a few schools of thought on this, I should be able to implement this idea and still be able to "tune" the riser at the end of the day.

A good detailed read of a "double duty riser" may be found in this construction article:
http://www.audioholics.com/diy-audio/mu ... seat-riser
Instead of using the Auralex spacers as shown in this article, I'm just going to use narrower joists on the interior bracing to permit air movement in the entire riser cavity... this was a recommendation I found on AVSForum. And rather than drilling 2" holes in the front face of the riser in each joist cavity; I'm going to start by drilling only 2x 1" holes in the front face at both corners in the left-most and right-most joist cavities, and then work my way towards the middle of the riser by drilling more holes through trial and error testing.

That kickstarter looks pretty dope though... perhaps I'll consider something like that in the future. Perhaps replace my front 3-row set of recliners, and buy 3 individual recliners set up on this 4D system.
Daijoubu wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 3:03 pm
OP said he looked into D-BOX but the AC motors needs maintenance from the sounds of it (plus you need the D-BOX HEMC box and subscription to download the motion code specific to your movie, etc)
So he wanted to just install bass shaker but if the risers can be turned into bass traps, then shakers won't even be necessery.
Yup,pretty well summed up. We'll see how successful this theory is.
discoblues wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 5:07 pm
Generally bass traps are filled with insulation. When the sound travels through the insulation it gets dissipated as heat due to the friction of the sound waves travelling through the insulation. Yes, in theory you can dissipate the sound another way, ie turning the riser into a giant passive resonator. I've had subs in the past with passive resonators as part of the enclosure. , while he resonators themselves were very firm material and moved about alot, they had almost as much give as the woofer cone itself. However I was wondering how the riser can move enough to simulate a powered tactile transducer if it was built as a solid structure with only a few holes in the front. (especially if it doesn't have any flexible parts to it like my old subs passive resonators.)

I did find a couple of articles that mentioned acheiving this but not filling the riser with much insulation, but you have to be very careful because if you don't get it right you could cause terrible amounts of reverb making certain frequencies sound awful.

Oh and I was totally joking about the dbox kickstarter thing ;)
Your thinking is along the right path... I've seen risers constructed with several laminated layers of OSB to try an stiffen the platform as much as possible. I think this is the exact opposite of what I'm trying to do.... Hence, why I'm only going with a single OSB layer affixed the base structure to promote some tactile response. Again, reading through several articles this past weekend, it seems like the "Sweet spot" for tactile response is filling each joist cavity to about 75% with insulation. So, I'll go with that and see how it turns out.
[OP]
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Jul 6, 2005
3515 posts
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Toronto
Android412 wrote:
Feb 19th, 2018 6:47 pm
First off, awesome thread. Building a dedicated HT with the budget you're putting behind it is beyond the reach of lot people (myself included). I mean 30k on a projector...never, even if I had the money I don't think I'd get that one passed the wife. Combining the budget with the pre-planning/research you've put in and taking pics every step of the way, really takes it from a potentially "meh" thread to a definite subscribe thread for me.

Second, are you sure the room is big enough, specifically the length? Seems like you're going to be really close to a screen of that size. I know the recommended sitting distance is shorter with 4k vs. 1080, but the front row looks like its about 3-4 ft from your 128" screen. Seems REALLY close to me. Could you not cover up the windows and extend it all the way to the back wall?

Third, someone has already mentioned it, but DIY speakers seems like a recipe for regret in my opinion. I will be the first to admit that I know nothing about them, and you've clearly done your research, so I'm guessing you have your reasons. My opinion is that speaker companies spend a crap load of money to take the guess work out of the equation, and DIY seems to put it right back in.

Either way thanks, great job so far.
Looking forward to the rest of the thread.
LOL... Thanks!!

I get what you're saying about not getting such a pricey projector past the "wife's nod of approval".... I've only been married for about 9 years, but the old saying remains true, "Happy Wife, Happy Life".... hence why you see that windowed area behind by HT is actually my wife's dedicated art studio/craft space. Would I have liked to make my HT bigger/longer and go right back to that window? OF COURSE... but you've gotta pick your battles. My wife now jokes that "I'm stealing her air" because the air supply/intake for the HT comes from the dead vent installed in a bulkhead of her studio. I definitely give my wife props though... she's pretty awesome.

The room is big enough... and JUST... using various room size calculators, I'm just past the THX recommended minimum for length and set back for my front row. And you're right having a native 4K projector definitely helps with these shorter distances. Being in the first row will certainly be an immersive experience, and even at one point considered a curved screen... unfortunately, I was unable to come across a ... reasonably priced.... acoustically transparent curved 2.35:1 screen. The front row is back far enough so that you're not 'tracking' the screen by moving your eyes to take in the image,

As of right now, I think the visual sweet spot will be in the back row in one of the middle two seats of the 4-seat-row, and the audible sweet spot will be in the front row in the middle seat of the 3-seat-row. If I can get both of those in the front row's middle seat... I'm claiming that as my personal MLP, and barring anyone else from sitting there. :)

DIY speakers would be a bit a challenge if I was sourcing all the components separately and building/dimensioning the boxes from scratch... but this DIY method is pretty fool proof. Click on the links for the products I linked to in Post #4. You'll see that it's basically just a kit, where by the box dimensions, volumes, porting, bracing, etc are specifically tuned to the cone and crossover in the kit. They even provide you with the right amount of stuffing.

So really all the hard work of tuning and calibrating is already done... you just have to build it. I guess you need to be somewhat handy. There's a HUGE following, especially on AVSForum (in fact a dedicated sub-forum) to DIY speaker builds. These speakers can certainly hold their own against branded products.
[OP]
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Small Project Update

So on Saturday I tackled putting up the projector mount. Figured someone may find this particular post useful in the future if they're looking to dampen vibrations to their projector from foot fall a floor above. Luckily, my mount is located under my kitchen island, but my kitchen island still contains a dishwasher, an insinkerator and is in an open concept kitchen/family room with lot of traffic above.

So, I bought 4 angled isolation clips with rubber dampers and affixed them to a piece of 2x10 board. This contraption then forms the base for my projector mounting plate. My projector weighs close to 50 lbs, so I needed this to be very robust. The base is secured with lag bolts to the joist and the mounting plate is also secured to the base with lag bolts.

The biggest PITA was getting this damn thing mounted level in all dimensions AND deep enough to account for clips/hat channel/2x drywall in such a small cavity. My contractor already installed the clips and hat channel and 1 layer of drywall, so while I had at least that as a reference point, it was still a pain to work around.

A wide shot of the projector mount.
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1 projector far.jpg
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A tight shot showing how the base is isolated from the joists.
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2 projector near.jpg
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Here, I'm just holding up the second layer of drywall to verify the clearance between the receiver plate screwed onto the extension pole and the 2nd layer of drywall. The distance is minimized and PERFECT for maximizing headroom below. The Chief mounts are best known for their low profile design.
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3 clearance.jpg
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Lastly, here's the completed installation with the insulation put back. I stuffed the inside of the extension pole with some safe 'n sound and plan to cap it with a putty pad to stop sound from propagating through the pole into the joist cavity. Now, my contractor will just cut a hole in the drywall slightly bigger than the diameter of the pole, and fill that gap with green glue sealant. The integrity of the sound dampened ceiling should remain intact.
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4 complete.jpg
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Last edited by Repooc on Feb 20th, 2018 10:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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your project is moving along very nicely indeed.

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