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Resignation - Less than 2 weeks & Employer asking for my letter of offer on new job?

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  • Jun 7th, 2013 12:41 am
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May 30, 2008
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Resignation - Less than 2 weeks & Employer asking for my letter of offer on new job?

I've never resigned from a company before as my previous employment experience were just term positions with end dates. A year ago, I landed a permanent job and today I got offered a new job at another company but the kicker is they want me to start in less than 2 weeks. So to get the ball rolling I told my current employer about my new opportunity and I am putting my notice in. They tell me they want to counter offer, so I told them the details of the new job. Of course they weren't happy with me leaving and this short notice as I've had nothing but good rapport at this position and had a positive review.

HOWEVER, one thing that threw me off is before they "counter offer or match" they want to see my letter of offer. I've never heard of this being done, isn't a letter offer considered a confidential document?

I know 2 weeks is the standard unwritten rule for resignation am I burning bridges by resigning in less than 2 weeks.

The new job wanted me to start right away, told them I couldn't so they pushed it back as far as they could.
20 replies
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May 9, 2007
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I would tell the current employer that, just as you hold information from them in confidence, you also hold information from another employer in confidence. I would tell them that I would welcome their counter-offer and that I would hold that counter-offer in confidence as well.

In this way I would both demonstrate to my current employer that I am an honourable person and preserve my negotiating position.
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Aug 28, 2007
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jerryhung wrote:
Jun 6th, 2013 9:26 am
I wouldn't even consider the counter-offer at all, too risky in future and you'll burn the bridge with the new employer also

May as well burn only 1 bridge, and start at the new job (in < 2 weeks)
I agree with the above.

Ignore the counter offer. I'm assuming that you sought out the new role as a way to gain more growth in your career and not just a bigger pay cheque (which seems shallow) to your employer.

Ignore their request and move on.
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jerryhung wrote:
Jun 6th, 2013 9:26 am
I wouldn't even consider the counter-offer at all, too risky in future and you'll burn the bridge with the new employer also

May as well burn only 1 bridge, and start at the new job (in < 2 weeks)
I agree as well
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Aug 20, 2012
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anton204 wrote:
Jun 5th, 2013 11:44 pm
I've never resigned from a company before as my previous employment experience were just term positions with end dates. A year ago, I landed a permanent job and today I got offered a new job at another company but the kicker is they want me to start in less than 2 weeks. So to get the ball rolling I told my current employer about my new opportunity and I am putting my notice in. They tell me they want to counter offer, so I told them the details of the new job. Of course they weren't happy with me leaving and this short notice as I've had nothing but good rapport at this position and had a positive review.

HOWEVER, one thing that threw me off is before they "counter offer or match" they want to see my letter of offer. I've never heard of this being done, isn't a letter offer considered a confidential document?

I know 2 weeks is the standard unwritten rule for resignation am I burning bridges by resigning in less than 2 weeks.

The new job wanted me to start right away, told them I couldn't so they pushed it back as far as they could.

They just want to see what salary the other firm is giving. As other posters said, dont let them see it. They may know people at the 2nd firm and put in a bad word for you. Use the PC line about keeping everything confidential. Unless you have a legal team negotiating your contract like the big celebs I wouldnt let the current firm know anything. Once you show the letter, the boss already knows you will leave at a dime... which means come lay-off time he will think of you as one of the first employees to lay off even if you renegotiate to stay. He will think well, you almost left us the first time at a dime. That's not the kind of person we want. OP is not a team player and shows no loyalty. Then you get laid off. I've seen this happen to a colleague in the past.
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Aug 15, 2006
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I agree with most people here, if you've already made the decision to leave in your heart, take the offer, don't negotiate or entertain a counter offer. If you accept the counter offer and stay, they'll lose respect for you b/c you were seen as someone who was bought back. As for your new job, if they want you that badly are they willing to wait so that you can give your employer 2 weeks notice? Try to keep it as PC and neutral as possible, burning bridges on your way out is never a good idea because you'll never know who'll you'll encounter in the future.
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Feb 14, 2013
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You are an employee offering your knowledge. You make them roll the business with your knowledge. And us the employee are working from X to X hours to earn our money and use it after work. We simply want the best offer.

So you say the counter-offer without showing any papers because lets say its a competitor or headhunter who's recruiting you between both companies there's maybe a non employee stealing agreement. And when you show the paper you show them the proof. But thats in extreme case..

You go see your current employer and ask better than what the new offer give you. If they want a proof you say no because if they want to keep you they will do everything. If they refuse then bye bye. Anyway thats what you want. You say i am giving my 2 weeks notice and going with a better offer and its nothing against the current employer but simply that we are all there for a reason and its to work for the best.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
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The big question is why you are leaving? If it is for an opportunity that is not going to be available in your current company, then this is moot. If this is salary/benefits related, then is nothing wrong with a looking at/for a counter offer. This happens all of the time. This is not particularly risky. Now, what should have been done is to bring forth before signing the second. The company could have either made adjustments or countered with a retention bonus (also quite common).

Would I show the letter? No. Would I describe what it entails? Sure. Now for large companies, our HR department knows within a % or two exactly what the salary is for a particular position.

I would not be worried about agreements between competitors...this is not allowed. The question might be did you have any agreement in place not to go to A, B or C?
Newbie
Jan 27, 2009
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Toronto
Question Resignation - Less than 2 weeks & Employer asking for my letter of offer on new job?



I've never resigned from a company before as my previous employment experience were just term positions with end dates. A year ago, I landed a permanent job and today I got offered a new job at another company but the kicker is they want me to start in less than 2 weeks. So to get the ball rolling I told my current employer about my new opportunity and I am putting my notice in. They tell me they want to counter offer, so I told them the details of the new job. Of course they weren't happy with me leaving and this short notice as I've had nothing but good rapport at this position and had a positive review.

HOWEVER, one thing that threw me off is before they "counter offer or match" they want to see my letter of offer. I've never heard of this being done, isn't a letter offer considered a confidential document?

I know 2 weeks is the standard unwritten rule for resignation am I burning bridges by resigning in less than 2 weeks.

The new job wanted me to start right away, told them I couldn't so they pushed it back as far as they could.


Last edited by anton204; Jun 6th, 2013 at 05:51 AM.

Without knowing your industry or whether this is an office environment or not, would change my answer a bit. However, I would be wary of this new organization which doesn't allow you to give your current organization at least 2 weeks notice. If the situation was reversed they would expect the same from you if or when you leave, no?

My point is that most organizations can WAIT an extra day or 2 or 3, to fill a role, the reason why they want you to start earlier is because they don't CARE if you burn a bridge (in fact they might WANT you to burn that bridge). This IMO shows poor form.
Newbie
Jun 5, 2013
1 posts
1 upvote
It would be madness to even entertain the counter offer. If they valued you, they probably knew what the other companies paid their employees and would have at least been competitive!
Deal Addict
Jun 29, 2009
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anton204 wrote:
Jun 5th, 2013 11:44 pm
I've never resigned from a company before as my previous employment experience were just term positions with end dates. A year ago, I landed a permanent job and today I got offered a new job at another company but the kicker is they want me to start in less than 2 weeks. So to get the ball rolling I told my current employer about my new opportunity and I am putting my notice in. They tell me they want to counter offer, so I told them the details of the new job. Of course they weren't happy with me leaving and this short notice as I've had nothing but good rapport at this position and had a positive review.

HOWEVER, one thing that threw me off is before they "counter offer or match" they want to see my letter of offer. I've never heard of this being done, isn't a letter offer considered a confidential document?

I know 2 weeks is the standard unwritten rule for resignation am I burning bridges by resigning in less than 2 weeks.

The new job wanted me to start right away, told them I couldn't so they pushed it back as far as they could.
1) never take counter offer, because the employer would already have in mind that "this guy would leave", they'll just slowly make sure you are easily replaceable (or worse) - counter offer is never a good idea
2) I would never show a job offer from one employer to another, other than telling them simple facts (I got offered $X, Y days vacation, etc)
3) 2 weeks is not "unwritten" - it's most likely is in your employment agreement
4) new employer aren't willing to wait 2 weeks? Generally for me this doesn't sound good - 2 weeks is NOT long, what makes them so unwilling to wait?
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Mar 29, 2008
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damnos wrote:
Jun 6th, 2013 12:07 pm
1) never take counter offer, because the employer would already have in mind that "this guy would leave", they'll just slowly make sure you are easily replaceable (or worse) - counter offer is never a good idea
Big +1
Deal Fanatic
May 29, 2006
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I gave notice, they asked me what it would take to stay, i asked for a 2% pension increase , a 4th weeks holidays, and a 8500$ raise. They agreed to all my terms, that was last summer and im still here.
Sr. Member
Nov 25, 2010
987 posts
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Kanada
Better salary is not a sufficient reason to leave for a new job, staying for a long time with the same company can help escalate the hierarchy ladders. Scotiabank's CEO started as a branch employee since 1970
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