Sports & Recreation

RFD Cycling Thread [OFFICIAL]

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 22nd, 2017 11:39 am
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 5, 2008
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Toronto
warpdrive wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 8:45 am
Sure, Cyclocross bikes are very versatile. Cyclocross is the name for bikes with traditional road bike geometry and dirt ready wheels, brakes, and tires used for off road racing. However, in the last few years, manufacturers have been coming out with another class of road bikes. I call them adventure bikes. Basically they use comfortable endurance geometry, vibration absorbing frames and disc brakes with wider (gravel ready) tires. Basically they are like everyday cyclocross bikes. Consider these as well to give you additional choices besides normal cyclocross bikes (which are more racing oriented)

examples:
https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/bike ... ip/f/F443/
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/anyroad-2
https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/men/b ... ee5/129184
http://www.gtbicycles.com/can_en/2017/b ... ade-tiagra
this.

Buy a gravel/adventure bike over a cyclocross bike.

Although you will find better deals on used cross bikes
Newbie
Sep 8, 2017
38 posts
22 upvotes
warpdrive wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 8:45 am
Sure, Cyclocross bikes are very versatile. Cyclocross is the name for bikes with traditional road bike geometry and dirt ready wheels, brakes, and tires used for off road racing. However, in the last few years, manufacturers have been coming out with another class of road bikes. I call them adventure bikes. Basically they use comfortable endurance geometry, vibration absorbing frames and disc brakes with wider (gravel ready) tires. Basically they are like everyday cyclocross bikes. Consider these as well to give you additional choices besides normal cyclocross bikes (which are more racing oriented)

examples:
https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/bike ... ip/f/F443/
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/anyroad-2
https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/men/b ... ee5/129184
http://www.gtbicycles.com/can_en/2017/b ... ade-tiagra
This is interesting. Although I'll look into them more (I never knew they existed!), I'm still struggling to see the benefit of getting an adventure bike over a cyclocross bike. I get that the cx is more racing-orientated, but isn't that an advantage over the adventure bike? Ie. Lighter frame, more durability, quicker etc.

Either way, thanks for pointing this out to me...I have a few more youtube videos to watch now!
Swerny wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 9:55 am
this.

Buy a gravel/adventure bike over a cyclocross bike.

Although you will find better deals on used cross bikes
Is there any particular reason to choose the adventure bike over the cyclocross? Also - if we're talking new - do the adventure bikes tend to be cheaper than the equivalently specced CX?
Ever since I discovered RFD, I've spent so much money in the interest of saving money...
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Mar 6, 2003
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CapKap wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 7:01 pm
I'm still struggling to see the benefit of getting an adventure bike over a cyclocross bike. I get that the cx is more racing-orientated, but isn't that an advantage over the adventure bike? Ie. Lighter frame, more durability, quicker etc.

Either way, thanks for pointing this out to me...I have a few more youtube videos to watch now!

Is there any particular reason to choose the adventure bike over the cyclocross? Also - if we're talking new - do the adventure bikes tend to be cheaper than the equivalently specced CX?
Basically, the adventure bike category rose out of the need for a less racing oriented all purpose drop bar bike. Cyclocross is a sport that has short loops over very technical courses, and requires an aggressive frame design which favors bikes that steer quickly and has little provision for comfortable long distance riding. Adventure bikes are basically comfortable road bikes that are designed for everyday use, and are more suited for general riding over long periods of time. The aggressive racing position of a CX bike may get tiresome if you are riding for hours and the quicker steering requires more effort to keep straight if there is a crosswind. They may provide extra features that you don't need on a pure CX bike, extra attachment points and room for even wider tires, racks and mudguards/fenders. There may be other differences too, cyclocross bikes may have a more racing oriented gearing suited for those courses where they need some low gearing but not much high gearing. Adventure bikes may have more road oriented gearing (higher top end and wider range).

(note: Different manufacturers will differentiate their CX bikes from their Adventure bikes in different ways so what I said may not be true for all brands)

Don't think that cyclocross bikes are just by default higher end and lighter. Yes cyclocross bikes are light because they need to be, but you can buy high end adventure bikes that are every bit as light. In reality, there is a lot of overlap between the two, but you should choose according your style of riding.

So what are you using it for? Are you riding on technical dirt paths going all out for short periods of time? Or are you just riding casually (sometimes all day) and need a bike that feels more stable and has features suited for a mix of duties?
Honey, I can't go to bed yet. Somebody is wrong on the Internet!
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Mar 11, 2004
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Mississauga
If someone told I HAVE to get rid of either my road bike with Di2 or my cross bike. I would not be all that sad to get rid of my road bike. Cross bike can do EVERYTHING that a road bike can do, and MOST of what a mountain bike can do.
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Oct 5, 2008
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Toronto
CapKap wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 7:01 pm
This is interesting. Although I'll look into them more (I never knew they existed!), I'm still struggling to see the benefit of getting an adventure bike over a cyclocross bike. I get that the cx is more racing-orientated, but isn't that an advantage over the adventure bike? Ie. Lighter frame, more durability, quicker etc.

Either way, thanks for pointing this out to me...I have a few more youtube videos to watch now!

Is there any particular reason to choose the adventure bike over the cyclocross? Also - if we're talking new - do the adventure bikes tend to be cheaper than the equivalently specced CX?
more comfortable, more versatile, fit huge tires, likely have thru axles front and rear, some have rack mounts etc.

They are a newer phenomenon so they would be more expensive than Cx bikes with everything else equal.
Last edited by Swerny on Oct 3rd, 2017 11:37 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Jan 27, 2011
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cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 11:24 am
Cross bike can do EVERYTHING that a road bike can do, and MOST of what a mountain bike can do.
But a Mountain Bike can do EVERYTHING a Road Bike, Cross and or Adventure Bike can do.

Cross/Adventure bikes was a way for bike companies to diversify their sales as both road and mountain bikes have hit a plateau. It's amazing what a little marketing can do to get most of us to spend our $$$ on something we already have!
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some1not wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 11:57 am
But a Mountain Bike can do EVERYTHING a Road Bike, Cross and or Adventure Bike can do.

Cross/Adventure bikes was a way for bike companies to diversify their sales as both road and mountain bikes have hit a plateau. It's amazing what a little marketing can do to get most of us to spend our $$$ on something we already have!
Nope. Not at all. And if you dont believe me lets go for a ride :)
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some1not wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 11:57 am
Cross/Adventure bikes was a way for bike companies to diversify their sales as both road and mountain bikes have hit a plateau. It's amazing what a little marketing can do to get most of us to spend our $$$ on something we already have!
Endurance road bikes are a relatively new category and one of the biggest selling categories in road bikes these days. The adventure bike is just a continuation of that concept, mixing touring and endurance attributes into a go-anywhere bike. The adventure bike is basically an endurance oriented cyclocross bike.

It's a perfectly valid concept and I'm actually surprised it took the manufacturers so long to come up with it.
Honey, I can't go to bed yet. Somebody is wrong on the Internet!
Deal Addict
Jan 27, 2011
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cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 1:04 pm
Nope. Not at all. And if you dont believe me lets go for a ride :)
If you're talking about speed and efficacy on pavement, yes the road and cross will be faster, as their gears, tires are build for that. But for general riding on pavement, gravel or dirt a mountain bike will do for 90% of the people.

Sure I'll go for a ride with you!
Up votes, down votes, they're all votes for me! I thank you!
Newbie
Sep 8, 2017
38 posts
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warpdrive wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 8:46 pm
Basically, the adventure bike category rose out of the need for a less racing oriented all purpose drop bar bike. Cyclocross is a sport that has short loops over very technical courses, and requires an aggressive frame design which favors bikes that steer quickly and has little provision for comfortable long distance riding. Adventure bikes are basically comfortable road bikes that are designed for everyday use, and are more suited for general riding over long periods of time. The aggressive racing position of a CX bike may get tiresome if you are riding for hours and the quicker steering requires more effort to keep straight if there is a crosswind. They may provide extra features that you don't need on a pure CX bike, extra attachment points and room for even wider tires, racks and mudguards/fenders. There may be other differences too, cyclocross bikes may have a more racing oriented gearing suited for those courses where they need some low gearing but not much high gearing. Adventure bikes may have more road oriented gearing (higher top end and wider range).

(note: Different manufacturers will differentiate their CX bikes from their Adventure bikes in different ways so what I said may not be true for all brands)

Don't think that cyclocross bikes are just by default higher end and lighter. Yes cyclocross bikes are light because they need to be, but you can buy high end adventure bikes that are every bit as light. In reality, there is a lot of overlap between the two, but you should choose according your style of riding.

So what are you using it for? Are you riding on technical dirt paths going all out for short periods of time? Or are you just riding casually (sometimes all day) and need a bike that feels more stable and has features suited for a mix of duties?
Thanks for the detailed explanation, that makes a lot of sense now. You've also sold me - I'm a casual, longer-distance rider looking for a versatile/multi-purposed bike.

Gonna start my hunt for a deal on an adventure bike!
Ever since I discovered RFD, I've spent so much money in the interest of saving money...
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Jan 30, 2006
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Vancouver
I have a mountain bike that I've had for 10 years and I've been commuting with this bike for 4 months. Approximately 1 hr ride time a day. I was having issues with the gears slipping etc a few days ago. Quite annoying. I took it the bike shop this morning. The derailer was adjusted and lined up correctly. I think the cables were adjusted as well. He took it for two test rides. Before he left he suggested I replace the "cassette" I took the bike and things seem so much better, smoother to ride etc. I was amazed.

Does the "cassette" make that much difference, even though things seem to be quite good shiuld I have it replaced as he suggested? Or just wait until it starts happening again. I'm thinking maybe as preventative measure have it replaced. The part would be $37 and $8-10 for the install.

Thoughts? I know very little about bikes but learning.

Thanks
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Sep 29, 2004
3526 posts
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trellaine201 wrote:
Oct 4th, 2017 11:22 pm
Does the "cassette" make that much difference, even though things seem to be quite good shiuld I have it replaced as he suggested? Or just wait until it starts happening again. I'm thinking maybe as preventative measure have it replaced. The part would be $37 and $8-10 for the install.

Thoughts? I know very little about bikes but learning.

Thanks
If you aren't experiencing any skipping, then you don't have to replace the cassette right away. Just make sure the chain is cleaned and lubed on a regular basis.
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
178 posts
5 upvotes
Vancouver
CapKap wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 7:40 pm
Thanks for the detailed explanation, that makes a lot of sense now. You've also sold me - I'm a casual, longer-distance rider looking for a versatile/multi-purposed bike.

Gonna start my hunt for a deal on an adventure bike!
I was in a similar situation as you. My advice - spend time with multiple different types of bikes and see what really suits you. I went in thinking that i wanted an adventure bike and settled on the crossrip 3. Now that i have it, i've learnt that I only enjoy pure road biking (dont like trails, never want to commute, etc) and makes me wish i bought a completely different bike.
Newbie
Sep 8, 2017
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spider78 wrote:
Oct 5th, 2017 3:37 pm
I was in a similar situation as you. My advice - spend time with multiple different types of bikes and see what really suits you. I went in thinking that i wanted an adventure bike and settled on the crossrip 3. Now that i have it, i've learnt that I only enjoy pure road biking (dont like trails, never want to commute, etc) and makes me wish i bought a completely different bike.
How do you recommend I accomplish this? Just go into my LBS and try out different bikes? Rent them?
Ever since I discovered RFD, I've spent so much money in the interest of saving money...

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