Automotive

The RFD elite : the 300,000km+ car club.

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  • Feb 14th, 2018 1:34 pm
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Member
Jul 27, 2015
266 posts
86 upvotes
British Columbia
Asker123 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 6:36 pm
Only advise I would give to this elite club is that members must have made min 100K kms of those 300k themselves.
There shouldn't be any pride in buying a car with 280K kms and at 300K , this club certfies them as elites...Grinning Face
Well said. I got my RSX @ 80k kms. Now has 315xxx
Venza has 120k kms and counting.

I wonder what's faster in straight line. V6 Venza 4000 lbs or RSX-S 6speed manual 3000lbs. Only one way to find out. Haha
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2004
2783 posts
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chilli604 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 6:51 pm
Well said. I got my RSX @ 80k kms. Now has 315xxx
Venza has 120k kms and counting.

I wonder what's faster in straight line. V6 Venza 4000 lbs or RSX-S 6speed manual 3000lbs. Only one way to find out. Haha
Lol at "elite" :) Elite is using TTC :))
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
37306 posts
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Toronto
chilli604 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 6:51 pm
Well said. I got my RSX @ 80k kms. Now has 315xxx
Venza has 120k kms and counting.

I wonder what's faster in straight line. V6 Venza 4000 lbs or RSX-S 6speed manual 3000lbs. Only one way to find out. Haha
An old V6 rav4 has some mags like motortrend rating it 6.3 seconds in a 0-60
The venza uses the same 3.5L 270hp V6
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
Walch1102 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 3:14 am
What's the point of driving a vehicle for so long? To save a few bucks?
I'm with you. I prefer a newer car. The new car will have new technology and better fuel efficiency.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 6, 2007
5516 posts
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Kootenays
Gee wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 11:48 pm
I'm with you. I prefer a newer car. The new car will have new technology and better fuel efficiency.
You have to get pretty amazing fuel efficiency to make up for$5,000- $7,000 per year in car payments.
Member
Feb 19, 2017
262 posts
107 upvotes
smacd wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:17 am
You have to get pretty amazing fuel efficiency to make up for$5,000- $7,000 per year in car payments.
Value of not having to drive a sh*t bucket?
Priceless.

I'm all for being financially saavy and buying a used car...but going past 200K is really pushing it.
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Oct 6, 2007
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Kootenays
Walch1102 wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:24 am
Value of not having to drive a sh*t bucket?
Priceless.

I'm all for being financially saavy and buying a used car...but going past 200K is really pushing it.
I'm thinking you don't know much about cars. 200,000 km is nothing for a decent modern car. None of my cars has ever been a sh*t bucket. I've never once been broken down and stranded. I always am aware of the state of my vehicles and maintain them properly, so I won't break down. If maintenance gets out of hand, I get rid of them. It helps to do your homework and buy a reliable vehicle to begin with.

I just turned over 140,000 miles (225,000 km) on my '09 Venza which I bought new in '10. I've done 5 trips of 2,000 km in the past year back and forth to the coast. We're doing another in March and we're not the least concerned. We'll drive it for another few years and probably give it to one of our kids. It's got 10 air bags, ABS, traction control, blutooth, etc. Nothing else tech wise I need right now.
Member
Feb 19, 2017
262 posts
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smacd wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:38 am
I'm thinking you don't know much about cars. 200,000 km is nothing for a decent modern car. None of my cars has ever been a sh*t bucket. I've never once been broken down and stranded. I always am aware of the state of my vehicles and maintain them properly, so I won't break down. If maintenance gets out of hand, I get rid of them. It helps to do your homework and buy a reliable vehicle to begin with.
Maybe you're right. I just don't know enough about cars. I've driven quite a few cars above 150K though and none of them ran really smooth. Reliable? Sure (until it break downs). Smooth and comfy compared to a newer 50K car? Never.

Plus, newer cars will always have some feature I find enticing (HUD, driver assist tech, bigger/faster nav screen, more torque/hp, etc.).
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Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
smacd wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:17 am
You have to get pretty amazing fuel efficiency to make up for$5,000- $7,000 per year in car payments.
The problem with old cars, you have lump sum payments (constant repairs) instead of monthly payments
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Jul 30, 2010
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Gee wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 4:05 am
The problem with old cars, you have lump sum payments (constant repairs) instead of monthly payments
Repairs are cheap though. You might have one repair per year in the couple hundred dollar range, if that. I haven't. As long as you stay away from cars with engine or transmission issues (the benefit of buying used, there is a lot of history and reviews so known issues are easy to find), you can't go wrong. Couple hundred here and there for a water pump, suspension parts, etc, cheaper if you go to wreckers (rockauto has eliminated that need for me, as their economy tier parts are usually the same or cheaper than wrecker parts).

That's still only 1 car payment out of 12 for a new car. You just have to be picky about your used car. Don't buy a used Porsche or Land Rover and expect cheap repairs.

This is definitely apart from the whole thing that new cars are full of new tech. Obviously, from a driver standpoint, driving a new vehicle is usually better (except when downgrading, say an old 4Runner vs. a new Micra or something cheap). And we are now getting into "aged" inventory that now has most of the good tech like traction control, ABS, etc. You can find used cars with heated seats and climate control too.

Are the new gadgets worth it though? Maybe; I thought the built-in backup cam of the new 4Runner was cool, but when I took the rental back I found that I don't need it and haven't thought about it since.
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Oct 6, 2007
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Kootenays
Gee wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 4:05 am
The problem with old cars, you have lump sum payments (constant repairs) instead of monthly payments
Maybe I've been lucky (or just have chosen wisely), but I've never had anything other than basic maintenance of oil changes, filters, brakes, tires and shocks. These are things you can see coming, so you budget for them if you have to. I did have the transmission start to slip periodically on a '97 F150 with 275,000km, so I sold it to a friend (who still drives it 4 years later with the same periodic slip) and bought a 2002 F150 with 140,000km for $3950 that I still drive. If you have a vehicle that needs constant repairs, you've either chosen poorly or are abusing it. Don't confuse periodic maintenance with constant repairs.
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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Toronto
Walch1102 wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:24 am
Value of not having to drive a sh*t bucket?
Priceless.

I'm all for being financially saavy and buying a used car...but going past 200K is really pushing it.
smacd wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 10:58 am
Maybe I've been lucky (or just have chosen wisely), but I've never had anything other than basic maintenance of oil changes, filters, brakes, tires and shocks. These are things you can see coming, so you budget for them if you have to. I did have the transmission start to slip periodically on a '97 F150 with 275,000km, so I sold it to a friend (who still drives it 4 years later with the same periodic slip) and bought a 2002 F150 with 140,000km for $3950 that I still drive. If you have a vehicle that needs constant repairs, you've either chosen poorly or are abusing it. Don't confuse periodic maintenance with constant repairs.
Thats the thing with new car people.
They think anytype of maintenance is an extensive repair. Some don't even get oil changes.
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Aug 2, 2004
26970 posts
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East Gwillimbury
I do regular maintenance. That’s not what I consider a repair.

I think the best way to own a car in Canada is to constantly buy used. Find a car that came off a lease or something that’s around 100,000 kms. Drive it for 2 years and sell it for what you paid. Even if you get a little less, you’re still ahead. Repeat this cycle every two years.

This way you get a newer car to drive, you have no major repairs and it costs you almost nothing to own the car.

Cars drop in price significantly in the first 5 years and then tend to level out from years 6 to 8
Member
Sep 29, 2014
481 posts
218 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Gee wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 11:48 pm
I'm with you. I prefer a newer car. The new car will have new technology and better fuel efficiency.
Me too. Better performance, the latest tech and also increased safety. The latest tech to avoid accidents along with better crash ratings is a big deal for me and my family. Safety has come a long way and I don't want a steering wheel in my face and a dash in my lap just to save a few bucks.
Newbie
Nov 19, 2006
64 posts
18 upvotes
Niagara
Fiddilixx wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 1:02 pm
Me too. Better performance, the latest tech and also increased safety. The latest tech to avoid accidents along with better crash ratings is a big deal for me and my family. Safety has come a long way and I don't want a steering wheel in my face and a dash in my lap just to save a few bucks.
That's where everyone is different. Personally I don't need 15 cameras and 100 sensors to get in and out of a parking spot so driving an "older" car without gadgets suits me just fine especially if that means not having a car payment and putting that extra cash towards paying off a mortgage or investing towards early retirement.

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