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RIP Terrance Dicks - Writer + Showrunner from classic Doctor Who

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  • Sep 4th, 2019 6:00 pm
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RIP Terrance Dicks - Writer + Showrunner from classic Doctor Who

I never really thought about it until I read this, but this guy basically got me reading as a kid in the mid 80's.
Back then, no VCR, and could only catch Doctor Who on TVO (did not have cable for the Buffalo broadcasts).
Would basically go the library specifically for Doctor Who books, always wondering who the hell this Dicks guy was, as majority of novels were written by him.

To this day, I really don't know much about him, but I appreciate the influence and warmth he most certainly created for all sorts of sci fi kids of various eras. Rest in peace, good sir.

https://io9.gizmodo.com/rip-terrence-di ... 1837817353
Terrance Dicks, one of the most influential writers in Doctor Who’s entire history, has died at the age of 84.

Dicks’ contribution to Doctor Who is legendary—after starting in television writing scripts for the haunting supernatural series The Avengers, he first joined the Doctor Who production team as an assistant script editor in 1968 with the Second Doctor serial “The Seeds of Death”, a series of scripts Dicks would ultimately play a major part in re-writing that lead not only to him becoming Script Editor on the show, but the writer behind “The War Games”, the 10-part epic that ended Patrick Troughton’s time as the Doctor.

From there, Dicks helped steer the era of the Third Doctor alongside equally legendary producer Barry Letts, completely re-imagining the series as the titular Time Lord found himself momentarily exiled on Earth. Although Dicks and Letts would join Pertwee in leaving in 1974, he had an important part to play in helping shape Who’s future even further with the casting of Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor. After he had departed as Script Editor, Dicks continued to write for Doctor Who, scripting stories like Baker’s debut, “Robot”, “The Brain of Morbius”, “Horror of Fang Rock”, and “State of Decay”. His final script for the series was actually one of the show’s most ambitious up to that point: “The Five Doctors”, the legendary 20th anniversary special. In all, over 150 episodes of the series were edited or written by Dicks, leaving an indelible mark on the program’s history.

But while Dicks’ commitment to Doctor Who as a TV series is unquestionable, he will remain forever beloved and remembered by a generation of fans—including ones like Chris Chibnall and Steven Moffat, who would go on to produce the series themselves—as the writer of many of Target’s classic Doctor Who novelizations. In an era where TV repeats were rare and home releases non-existent, the Target Doctor Who novelizations were many fans only way of either re-experiencing an story or encountering it for the first time, and they would do so most prominently through Dicks’ lens: he wrote more than 60 of the 156 classic Target books.
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R.I.P.

The Doctor Who episodes from the 1960s and 1970s are my favourites, I would like to see the Tom Baker “Morbius” episodes again. Years ago one of the TV networks (maybe PBS) played all the old Doctor Who episodes, very enjoyable.
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I used to read the books also some of them he wrote when I was a kid. The old shows were so much better than the new ones. They should just remake the old ones with updated CGI.

Tom Baker best doctor.
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webshark wrote:
Sep 3rd, 2019 7:29 pm
Tom Baker best doctor.
He's the guy I started with (in 1980), at around age six.
I had an older brother who watched, so I did too.
Remember not knowing what was going on, and being absolutely scared shitless by the stones of blood (Key to Time season). In fact, this is almost for sure one of the big reasons I've had an aversion to blood my entire life, lol.

As a kid, I really got into the books, mostly because there was no other way to be familiar with the backstory.
I had a friend who had cable a few houses down, and I would specifically there to catch some PBS Doctor Who. Channel 17, I think. Man - the marathons - the pledge drives - and the cool Doctor Who themed donation rewards. I had no money, and my folks were just squeezing by then, so pure wantful window shopping.

But yeah - I went through many of those books (from the library).
It would only be years later, when YTV hit the scene (or was it Space), that they broadcasted all available episodes from Bill to Sylvester. Recorded them all with the VCR.

My one really distinct memory of childhood Doctor Who fandom was no other kids from school knowing what I was talking about. My cousins constantly mocked my brother and I for our fandom. It certainly was not trendy to be a fan.

In the early 90's, there was a Doctor Who convention I attended in Toronto - Chronic Hysteresis
Ended up winning a raffle where I got to hang out with Jamie and Nyssa.
It was weird and funny.
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shikotee wrote:
Sep 3rd, 2019 8:30 pm
He's the guy I started with (in 1980), at around age six.
I had an older brother who watched, so I did too.
Remember not knowing what was going on, and being absolutely scared shitless by the stones of blood (Key to Time season). In fact, this is almost for sure one of the big reasons I've had an aversion to blood my entire life, lol.

As a kid, I really got into the books, mostly because there was no other way to be familiar with the backstory.
I had a friend who had cable a few houses down, and I would specifically there to catch some PBS Doctor Who. Channel 17, I think. Man - the marathons - the pledge drives - and the cool Doctor Who themed donation rewards. I had no money, and my folks were just squeezing by then, so pure wantful window shopping.

But yeah - I went through many of those books (from the library).
It would only be years later, when YTV hit the scene (or was it Space), that they broadcasted all available episodes from Bill to Sylvester. Recorded them all with the VCR.

My one really distinct memory of childhood Doctor Who fandom was no other kids from school knowing what I was talking about. My cousins constantly mocked my brother and I for our fandom. It certainly was not trendy to be a fan.

In the early 90's, there was a Doctor Who convention I attended in Toronto - Chronic Hysteresis
Ended up winning a raffle where I got to hang out with Jamie and Nyssa.
It was weird and funny.
Lol

same episode scared me too. Still kinda freaks me out thinking about it now.

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