Expired Hot Deals

[Rogers] Rogers Extreme Internet $45 for 8 years

Newbie
Dec 8, 2012
65 posts
13 upvotes
CONCORD
May wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 12:25 pm
Why it shouldn't be listed in rogers.com website, is it a secret

Too bad I was looking to use this deal to negotiate with Bell
Your second sentence is the answer for your question in first line...
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 17, 2005
1373 posts
81 upvotes
Funjabi wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 12:56 pm
Your second sentence is the answer for your question in first line...
It seems like you working with Rogers.
Member
Aug 24, 2009
374 posts
60 upvotes
Super_Chicken wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 12:36 pm
I'd rather pay teksavvy the $50 a month for the slower speed, unlimited bandwidth and mostly because bell and rogers isn't getting paid.
Sure they are - it's just whatever wholesale rate TekSavvy must pay to either Bell or Rogers.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 1, 2010
4786 posts
993 upvotes
Kanata
Tried to call, said it's not available. Are you guys getting this from normal agents or retentions department?
Uh, yeah, I'd like to speak to a Mr. Tabooger, first name Ollie.
Member
Nov 14, 2007
334 posts
30 upvotes
Toronto
I just got the deal.
At first, they offered me a 25% off.
I called this number. 1-866-210-4059 (Set up a new service).
Deal Guru
Oct 6, 2005
14653 posts
1457 upvotes
Super_Chicken wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 12:36 pm
I'd rather pay teksavvy the $50 a month for the slower speed, unlimited bandwidth and mostly because bell and rogers isn't getting paid.
I get the same speeds as Rogers... but unfortunately Teksavvy does pay Rogers about 15.00 - 20.00 a month to rent access.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 22, 2004
1706 posts
376 upvotes
Ottawa
coolspot wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 1:38 pm
I get the same speeds as Rogers... but unfortunately Teksavvy does pay Rogers about 15.00 - 20.00 a month to rent access.
You're getting 35 Mpbs/3 Mpbs with Teksavvy? :-0

My TSI Extreme is 28 Mpbs/1Mpbs for $46.95 + $6.10 HST. How did you get the same deal as the OP?
A bargain is something you don't need at a price you can't resist.
Member
User avatar
Nov 9, 2010
392 posts
238 upvotes
Scarborough, ON
bkim3 wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 1:26 pm
I just got the deal.
At first, they offered me a 25% off.
I called this number. 1-866-210-4059 (Set up a new service).
I just tried calling that number, explained the Express with 200GB/mo for $45 deal, and the guy said it was a student deal that they offered up until December. Said he couldn't find and had never heard of an 8-year price guarantee on anything , but that the student deal was for 8 months. Offered me the %25 off deal. He was sure that the student deal ended in December and that there were no similar offers at this time.

How did you manage to get it? Mind control?

YMMV, I guess...
Member
Nov 14, 2007
334 posts
30 upvotes
Toronto
Strange. I just mentioned that a friend of mine got the deal. After he took a minute or two, he confirmed it.
Region specific, maybe.
Member
User avatar
Jan 5, 2009
291 posts
31 upvotes
I called retentions.
Tabooger wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 1:19 pm
Tried to call, said it's not available. Are you guys getting this from normal agents or retentions department?
Member
Sep 22, 2012
223 posts
51 upvotes
Toronto
djwalsh3000 wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 2:19 pm
I just tried calling that number, explained the Express with 200GB/mo for $45 deal, and the guy said it was a student deal that they offered up until December. Said he couldn't find and had never heard of an 8-year price guarantee on anything , but that the student deal was for 8 months. Offered me the %25 off deal. He was sure that the student deal ended in December and that there were no similar offers at this time.

How did you manage to get it? Mind control?

YMMV, I guess...
Not express.. Extreme. I asked if they have the same deal with the other plans and the agent I spoke with said only for Extreme.
Deal Addict
May 15, 2004
1976 posts
39 upvotes
how on earth do you get 200GB per month for extreme
Member
Sep 22, 2012
223 posts
51 upvotes
Toronto
DuDe1411 wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 3:12 pm
how on earth do you get 200GB per month for extreme
Did you not read the original post?

No contract
$45.00 Rogers Extreme Internet (35 Mpbs/3 Mpbs)
Free extreme modem
200 GB a month
$14.95 activation charge
$49.95 installation fee
+Taxes
This rate is guaranteed for eight years with any increase to be credited back to you on monthly basis
Deal Addict
May 15, 2004
1976 posts
39 upvotes
Cuddlebudy wrote:
Jan 23rd, 2013 4:16 pm
Did you not read the original post?

No contract
$45.00 Rogers Extreme Internet (35 Mpbs/3 Mpbs)
Free extreme modem
200 GB a month
$14.95 activation charge
$49.95 installation fee
+Taxes
This rate is guaranteed for eight years with any increase to be credited back to you on monthly basis
I did read thank you very much. but the bundle for extreme that they offer on the site or any existing is 120GB if i'm not mistaken.
Newbie
Apr 22, 2006
36 posts
3 upvotes
simsimi1004 wrote:
Jan 21st, 2013 7:01 pm
because even with other providers arising, rogers/telus/shaw are still an ogliopoly.
There is a myth that the CRTC is responsible for the evil of low bandwidth caps that plauges Canadian Internet users. The CRTC's role in this matter, however, is more positive for consumers, but not unambiguously so. All the CRTC has done with respect to this issue is to prohibit phone and cable companies -- in their capacity as wholesalers to reselling ISPs -- from billing them on a per-GB basis (which would screw consumers and competitors). The problem isn't that the CRTC is too powerful, it's that it has fallen victim to regulatory capture and does not do enough to protect consumers, especially with respect to their dealings with ISPs and cellular phone providers. That's why anti-competitive, anti-consumer practices are able to fester in these domains.

The CRTC and the government are incapable of making the simple distinctions that Adam Smith made nearly 2 centuries ago between consumer goods and infrastructure or between business domains where perfect competition is viable and ones that are meant to be natural monopolies. Fancy suits and high-end portable audio players, for instance, would be example of things that are consumer goods rather than infrastructure and of things that exist within a market that approaches perfect competition. Simply put, consumers have ready access to comparable alternatives or to more affordable inferior goods (a term that I use in the context of economics rather than in the context of quality) that can be used for much the same purposes. One can easily buy a suit not made by Armani or easily wear clothing other suits. Likewise, one can easily buy a portable audio player not made by Apple or find other means of listening to music. Thus, the success of a company like Apple or Armani in the marketplace is a function of their ability to find an optimal combination of product quality, brand promotion, and customer service (optimal in this case meaning that which maximizes profits, not that which is a subjective or an objective measure of excellence, the latter measure being the domain of consumers and reviewers). With Internet access, however, consumer choice is limited to either the companies that own the cable and copper infrastructure (with satellite, cellular, and wireless technologies being inferior goods in regions where this infrastructure is not readily available) or to the smaller companies that they wholesale to, with availability being further restricted in some regions. True, in some regions there may be limits on the physical availability of consumer goods that in theory can impose artificially high prices (and this remains an especially salient concern with respect to food prices in Northern Canada), but this can generally be mitigated through the use of Internet shopping, which can exert downward pressure on the price of consumer goods in sparsely populated regions where there would otherwise not be viable competition.

The CRTC should actually go further and force the cable and telephone companies to act only as wholesaler (and for its part, the government should form a PPP with IT companies not currently competing in the Canadian marketplace to build a national fibre optic network, though this is perhaps less vital than the concerns pertaining to the regulation of existing services). They benefited from a time when nobody was allowed to compete against them in building this infrastructure (which was a logical thing to do given the financial, logistical, and aesthetic consequences of their being too many build-outs) and should not be allowed to leverage advantages they acquired in the era of regulated monopolies in a different economic arrangement because it screws clients and potential competitors.
× < >

Top