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Roxul sound proofing opinion

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  • Nov 10th, 2017 3:51 pm
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Member
Feb 17, 2012
456 posts
65 upvotes
Toronto
hagbard wrote:
Sep 8th, 2017 4:10 pm
Welcome to nine years ago.
Well in case someone was interested....

I noticed some members claim Soundproofing using roxul doesn't work but i can bet they installed it incorrectly. It is supposed to be installed without any compression. its supposed to stay in its original form. Ways you can reduce noise aswell is by adding a 2nd layer of drywall (also improves fire rating) and by adding a "Resilient channel" beforehand on the wall studs or joists overhead. Hope that helps.
Member
Sep 9, 2008
442 posts
61 upvotes
Mississauga
Chazzman wrote:
Sep 8th, 2017 3:42 pm
There are measures you can take to reduce sound transmission through ductwork.

Sections of flexible duct can be utilized.
Duct mufflers can be fitted.
Dynamat can be inserted into register entrances.
Antivibration coating can be applied to outside of ductwork.
Insulation socks can be pulled over steel ducts.

I am in the middle of renovating basement and installed a duct muffler on the duct that runs up to the master bedroom.... and pulled duct insulating socks over many of the longer runs..... also removed sections and replaced with small sections of flexible duct in areas where flow was not an issue. I also coated the supply and return headers with antivibe.

I can now work on the basement at night, with my wife saying she can hardly hear anything. Before, if I had the radio on low, or tried doing anything down there..... she would get woken up.
Post some pictures of your work, I'd like to see the insulation socks and duct muffler. Thanks
Deal Addict
Jul 6, 2005
3095 posts
597 upvotes
Toronto
Szharkov wrote:
Sep 11th, 2017 9:56 am
Post some pictures of your work, I'd like to see the insulation socks and duct muffler. Thanks
+1 and where you bought them from. (links?)
Newbie
Oct 19, 2010
92 posts
13 upvotes
Hi guys, I'm looking for ways to dampen sound between floors. I've read all the great suggestions on RFD but wanted to see what everyone thinks of my proposed method. Currently, our basement is finished but not occupied and there is no insulation between the floors. I'm trying to keep it cost-effective and I'm not totally looking to eliminate noise; just dampen the noise as much as possible. Firstly, I'm looking to blow in some cellulose insulation between the floor joists by drilling holes in the current layer of drywall. Next, I'm looking to add a second, thicker layer of drywall with green glue on the boards. I will likely do all the work myself but just have someone come in for the finishing portion of the drywall.

I just wanted to get some thoughts, comments and opinions on the above-noted method. Again, I'm looking to keep it cost-effective as I know by taking down the current finished drywall and redoing with insulation, resilient channels etc would be the best method, but also the most expensive. The end goal is to be able to use the basement as an additional space for kids to play in and have guests spend the night, etc. Lastly, does anyone have any idea on how much materials would cost in this above-noted method? The total basement ceiling is roughly 900 sq ft.

Thanks!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
1774 posts
720 upvotes
KINGSTON,ON
sniper89 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 6:09 pm
Hi guys, I'm looking for ways to dampen sound between floors. I've read all the great suggestions on RFD but wanted to see what everyone thinks of my proposed method. Currently, our basement is finished but not occupied and there is no insulation between the floors. I'm trying to keep it cost-effective and I'm not totally looking to eliminate noise; just dampen the noise as much as possible. Firstly, I'm looking to blow in some cellulose insulation between the floor joists by drilling holes in the current layer of drywall. Next, I'm looking to add a second, thicker layer of drywall with green glue on the boards. I will likely do all the work myself but just have someone come in for the finishing portion of the drywall.

I just wanted to get some thoughts, comments and opinions on the above-noted method. Again, I'm looking to keep it cost-effective as I know by taking down the current finished drywall and redoing with insulation, resilient channels etc would be the best method, but also the most expensive. The end goal is to be able to use the basement as an additional space for kids to play in and have guests spend the night, etc. Lastly, does anyone have any idea on how much materials would cost in this above-noted method? The total basement ceiling is roughly 900 sq ft.

Thanks!
I haven't delved into the dampening effect of cellulose, but one consideration is the potential for inconsistency in depths. Of course, it depends on how many holes (and patches) you want to have; the more holes, the less chance you'll have thin sections. At some point it just makes more sense to pull the ceiling down and use batts. I know this sounds like a lot of work, but in the end it really isn't. On top of that, every hole you cut will be a sound leak point if you don't patch it properly.
I'll assume that you read the information provided at the Greeen Glue site, since you are considering using this product. Pay particular attention to the triple leaf effect.

Frankly, unless you are planning a basement apartment or a home theatre set up, I doubt whether children or occasional guests warrant the trouble and expense.
Newbie
Oct 19, 2010
92 posts
13 upvotes
MrFrugal1 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 8:27 pm
I haven't delved into the dampening effect of cellulose, but one consideration is the potential for inconsistency in depths. Of course, it depends on how many holes (and patches) you want to have; the more holes, the less chance you'll have thin sections. At some point it just makes more sense to pull the ceiling down and use batts. I know this sounds like a lot of work, but in the end it really isn't. On top of that, every hole you cut will be a sound leak point if you don't patch it properly.
I'll assume that you read the information provided at the Greeen Glue site, since you are considering using this product. Pay particular attention to the triple leaf effect.

Frankly, unless you are planning a basement apartment or a home theatre set up, I doubt whether children or occasional guests warrant the trouble and expense.
Thanks for the reply. The more I read into it, the more I think pulling down the ceiling would be the best bet. I think using bat insulation combined with resilient channels, and using 2 layers of 1/2 inch drywall would serve my purpose well. For the time being we don't have the intention of turning it into a basement apartment but that is something we may explore in a few years so I'd want to do a good enough job to be suitable for that purpose. I think with this revised approach, I could do without the green glue.
Jr. Member
Dec 9, 2013
189 posts
41 upvotes
Toronto
sniper89 wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 1:55 am
Thanks for the reply. The more I read into it, the more I think pulling down the ceiling would be the best bet. I think using bat insulation combined with resilient channels, and using 2 layers of 1/2 inch drywall would serve my purpose well. For the time being we don't have the intention of turning it into a basement apartment but that is something we may explore in a few years so I'd want to do a good enough job to be suitable for that purpose. I think with this revised approach, I could do without the green glue.
The best and most cost efficient approach, IMO is put pink batt insulation between the ceiling joists (there are studies showing Roxul is only slightly better for sound insulation vs pink Batts), decouple the drywall using resilient channeling (to stop vibration/bass sounds) and then put 5/8" drywall attached to the resilient channeling.

Or if you have an unlimited budget, go spray foam between ceiling joists, resilient channeling/genie clips and then 2 sheets of drywall with green glue.

Good luck!
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 30, 2014
28 posts
Toronto, ON
Chazzman wrote:
Sep 8th, 2017 3:42 pm
There are measures you can take to reduce sound transmission through ductwork.

Sections of flexible duct can be utilized.
Duct mufflers can be fitted.
Dynamat can be inserted into register entrances.
Antivibration coating can be applied to outside of ductwork.
Insulation socks can be pulled over steel ducts.

I am in the middle of renovating basement and installed a duct muffler on the duct that runs up to the master bedroom.... and pulled duct insulating socks over many of the longer runs..... also removed sections and replaced with small sections of flexible duct in areas where flow was not an issue. I also coated the supply and return headers with antivibe.

I can now work on the basement at night, with my wife saying she can hardly hear anything. Before, if I had the radio on low, or tried doing anything down there..... she would get woken up.
Do you mind sharing which products you used and how you went obtaining these ? Thank you.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2015
2583 posts
457 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
Just mktg... regular roxul or fibreglass just as good/bad for sound insulation... although roxul might be easier to handle/place and regular roxul has better fireproofing I believe [not sure].

The type of noise you are trying to minimize will dictate what to use and not always insulation.

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/com ... ilar-sound
http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/sou ... om-basics/

If you're gonna use roxul, just get whatever is cheaper, regular roxul insulation or sound. The additional properties of roxul are what I would highlight and not necessarily the sound properties.

My point was that for most folks the extra cost of roxul sound not worth it.

Several things go into sound isolation, big ones are decoupling and mass which is not insulation related. Then you have dampening and absorption; latter which is where insulation helps.

Suggest read the audio visual forums... some of these folks making rooms that cost more then houses!!

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