Automotive

Safest cars . according to IIHS - Korean, Japanese and German

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  • Dec 12th, 2017 2:07 am
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Safest cars . according to IIHS - Korean, Japanese and German

Some interesting information..

http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/l ... story.html

It seems Hyundai - Kia and Subaru are producing some safe cars according to IIHS
Hyundai, Kia, Genesis and Subaru clean up in IIHS 2018 safety ratings
https://www.autoblog.com/2017/12/07/hyu ... -ab-tile-7
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But they don't make any pickups... how is that possible? /s
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Nov 15, 2017
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Good for Subaru! I applaud them for keeping the belt line reasonably low (i.e. maintaining good visibility).
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Key changes for 2018 are:
  • Top Safety Pick + now need to have "GOOD" rated headlights, 2017 only required "Acceptable"
  • Top Safety Pick + now need to have "Good/Acceptable" Passenger Side overlap, 2017 had no requirement
  • Top Safety Pick now need to have "Acceptable" headlights, 2017 had no requirement
With these new requirements, only 15 cars get a TSP+ rating.
2017 TSP+ had 50+ cars qualify.
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No surprise there. All luxury car makers do is put leather everywhere, put fancy wood in the car, and slap their logo on the car and it will sell like hotcakes like the crappy 320. Oh and for extra money, let's make a car for every number up to 10. 1 series, 2 series, 3 series, 4 series...u get the point.

Hopefully the Genesis brand takes off and in 10 years gives BMW/Audi a run for their money. Good job Hyundai.
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AstulzerRSX wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 7:09 pm
Key changes for 2018 are:
  • Top Safety Pick + now need to have "GOOD" rated headlights, 2017 only required "Acceptable"
  • Top Safety Pick + now need to have "Good/Acceptable" Passenger Side overlap, 2017 had no requirement
  • Top Safety Pick now need to have "Acceptable" headlights, 2017 had no requirement

    So some manufacturers are thinking ahead and making safer cars that meet more requirements , than just making one side of the car have better impact than the other side.
With these new requirements, only 15 cars get a TSP+ rating.
2017 TSP+ had 50+ cars qualify.
So some manufacturers are thinking ahead and making safer cars that meet more requirements , than just making one side of the car have better impact than the other side.
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I was on the scene of a high speed, head on collision last night. It was a Kia Optima vs a Ford Edge. Both cars obviously suffered extensive front end damage, but if you looked inside the Kia, other than the air bags, there was no signs that the car had been in an accident. The dash board and A pillars didn't move an inch and the doors were able to be opened and closed freely.

The Ford Edge; however, didn't fare as well. The dashboard was driven into the driver and the doors were jammed shut, resulting in the fire department having to extricate the driver. The cabin of the vehicle suffered extensive damage, likely resulting in further injuries to the driver (the paramedics stated his left femur was broken, which is where he was pinned by the dashboard).

I was very surprised how well the Kia held up, surprised and impressed.
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To chime in, I was involved in an accident approx a month and half ago. I was rear ended by a trailer truck, and it was my C300. One and only thought, my bumper was *****d from the impact of this big *** truck. But to my surprise, I only had a few paint scrubs on the back bumper and no dents or any sign of crack. Didn't call the cops, just talked it out with the truck driver. Took it to my mechanic, and he checked the car, and there was no internal damage either.

Long story short, same type of incident happened to my wife's Corolla but a normal car (I think it was Lexus) had hit it in the rear bumper (it was raining and the guy said he couldn't brake in time). Didn't call the cops, because it looked like a fender bender. But her bumper was dented and slightly pushed down. The guy paid for the damage.

From my guessing, German cars are built with better structure then compared to Japanese cars, because comparing the two incidents, I thought the truck would have hulk smashed my C300.
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kabyLake wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 6:42 am
From my guessing, German cars are built with better structure then compared to Japanese cars, because comparing the two incidents, I thought the truck would have hulk smashed my C300.
Yeah that totally makes sense to compare a corolla to C300.

Maybe jetta is as strong as C300 too cause it's german
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mathiewannabe wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 7:03 am
Yeah that totally makes sense to compare a corolla to C300.

Maybe jetta is as strong as C300 too cause it's german
Well we have to compare apple's to orange's, not apple to apple.
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Shaner wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 10:19 pm
I was on the scene of a high speed, head on collision last night. It was a Kia Optima vs a Ford Edge. Both cars obviously suffered extensive front end damage, but if you looked inside the Kia, other than the air bags, there was no signs that the car had been in an accident. The dash board and A pillars didn't move an inch and the doors were able to be opened and closed freely.

The Ford Edge; however, didn't fare as well. The dashboard was driven into the driver and the doors were jammed shut, resulting in the fire department having to extricate the driver. The cabin of the vehicle suffered extensive damage, likely resulting in further injuries to the driver (the paramedics stated his left femur was broken, which is where he was pinned by the dashboard).

I was very surprised how well the Kia held up, surprised and impressed.
Any idea what year each of the cars were? An Edge could be 11 years old now, which is a long time in safety standards. I'm assuming Optima was newer as 10 year old Kia's would have fared as well.
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engineered wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 9:36 am
Any idea what year each of the cars were? An Edge could be 11 years old now, which is a long time in safety standards. I'm assuming Optima was newer as 10 year old Kia's would have fared as well.
Both vehicles looked newer, but I can't say for sure. Either way, my point was more about how well the Kia held up. The front end absorbed the entire blow and there was no damage further back.
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kabyLake wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 6:42 am
To chime in, I was involved in an accident approx a month and half ago. I was rear ended by a trailer truck, and it was my C300. One and only thought, my bumper was *****d from the impact of this big *** truck. But to my surprise, I only had a few paint scrubs on the back bumper and no dents or any sign of crack. Didn't call the cops, just talked it out with the truck driver. Took it to my mechanic, and he checked the car, and there was no internal damage either.

Long story short, same type of incident happened to my wife's Corolla but a normal car (I think it was Lexus) had hit it in the rear bumper (it was raining and the guy said he couldn't brake in time). Didn't call the cops, because it looked like a fender bender. But her bumper was dented and slightly pushed down. The guy paid for the damage.

From my guessing, German cars are built with better structure then compared to Japanese cars, because comparing the two incidents, I thought the truck would have hulk smashed my C300.
Yep - German cars are expensive for a reason. Not because of the fancy electronics and leather - those only contribute a small percentage of the cost. The real engineering goes into what you can't see such as the safety and structure design down to the unique formulation of the metal used in the body construction. Even the weld, joints, angle, thickness etc all play a critical role at how well the car handles a crash and the energy transfer to the occupant. I grew up around Daimler vehicles and their design philosophy is safety first, then cost. Unlike the other manufacturers where cost is the number one priority. My dad also spent a few decade leading a team on the design and R&D of car body structure for the German Big 3 and the other OEMs so I have a good inside look on the internal processes.

If I am not mistaken when IIHS first introduced the small overlap test (very brutal), Mercedes is the only vehicle that passed with acceptable ratings. Every other car had to go back to the drawing board because they are designed ONLY to pass the older IIHS test to make it look good in marketing.
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kabyLake wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 6:42 am
From my guessing, German cars are built with better structure then compared to Japanese cars, because comparing the two incidents, I thought the truck would have hulk smashed my C300.
Triple facepalm. Every time I read a blanket statement like this, I lose faith in humanity. There are German cars that are great, and others not so great. Same with the Japanese. You cannot compare different manufacturers with cars in different segments and reach a conclusion.
traderjay wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 10:43 am
If I am not mistaken when IIHS first introduced the small overlap test (very brutal), Mercedes is the only vehicle that passed with acceptable ratings. Every other car had to go back to the drawing board because they are designed ONLY to pass the older IIHS test to make it look good in marketing.
The old Volvo XC90 also did very well, even though it was designed at least a decade before the small overlap test.
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kabyLake wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 6:42 am
To chime in, I was involved in an accident approx a month and half ago. I was rear ended by a trailer truck, and it was my C300. One and only thought, my bumper was *****d from the impact of this big *** truck. But to my surprise, I only had a few paint scrubs on the back bumper and no dents or any sign of crack. Didn't call the cops, just talked it out with the truck driver. Took it to my mechanic, and he checked the car, and there was no internal damage either.

Long story short, same type of incident happened to my wife's Corolla but a normal car (I think it was Lexus) had hit it in the rear bumper (it was raining and the guy said he couldn't brake in time). Didn't call the cops, because it looked like a fender bender. But her bumper was dented and slightly pushed down. The guy paid for the damage.

From my guessing, German cars are built with better structure then compared to Japanese cars, because comparing the two incidents, I thought the truck would have hulk smashed my C300.
So you're saying you knew exactly the circumstances (including speed, angle of impact and conditions as well as a number if physics variables) of both accidents (one you weren't even present for)to be able essentially conclude "Yep the the love tap on my C300 would have destroyed my wife's Corolla".
If so safety conscience why not give your wife the C300? Hell C300s all around.
traderjay wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 10:43 am
Yep - German cars are expensive for a reason. Not because of the fancy electronics and leather - those only contribute a small percentage of the cost. The real engineering goes into what you can't see such as the safety and structure design down to the unique formulation of the metal used in the body construction. Even the weld, joints, angle, thickness etc all play a critical role at how well the car handles a crash and the energy transfer to the occupant. I grew up around Daimler vehicles and their design philosophy is safety first, then cost. Unlike the other manufacturers where cost is the number one priority. My dad also spent a few decade leading a team on the design and R&D of car body structure for the German Big 3 and the other OEMs so I have a good inside look on the internal processes.

If I am not mistaken when IIHS first introduced the small overlap test (very brutal), Mercedes is the only vehicle that passed with acceptable ratings. Every other car had to go back to the drawing board because they are designed ONLY to pass the older IIHS test to make it look good in marketing.
Horribly mistaken
Actually they failed miserably and gave a BS answer.
http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/48667462

http://www.mercurynews.com/2012/08/14/m ... rash-test/

"We believe that the IIHS ‘small overlap frontal crash test’ replicates an unusually severe and correspondingly uncommon accident scenario, and that there are parts of the testing protocol which may have put the C-Class wrongfully at a disadvantage. We think this is because actual deformation characteristics and real-world kinematics of vehicles involved in this type of crash are very different from the construct of the IIHS test. – Mercedes-Benz"

-http://fourtitude.com/news/Audi_News_1/ ... rash-test/


It was the Japanese companies that essentially bowed in shame and said "Ok we'll try harder next round."
The TL was basically the only "Luxury" car out of all the non-Volvos that even came close, last I checked MB didn't make the TL.

P.S. I still don't consider Acura a "Luxury" brand at this rate I'd give Genesis more cred. So I'm not an Acura/Honda Fanboi.

Rose colored glasses for the German brands....

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