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Salary negotiation: made mistake, how to fix?

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  • Jul 18th, 2017 10:44 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2007
723 posts
39 upvotes

Salary negotiation: made mistake, how to fix?

I have not previously negotiated a salary. Have been in touch with recruiters at a company and a contact there is telling me they really want to hire me. Even going as far as custom crafting this positions requirements to suit me. I applied and they got back to me the next day to set up an interview.

They did a preliminary interview and asked what salary I'd be looking for. And that's where I think I screwed up. I gave a number only slightly higher than what I make now. This job involves a longer commute and looks like potentially more hours. I would want and at least before I gave that low number I think I could get a lot more.

How do I deal with this? Do I just ignore what I said or ? Any tips appreciated.
4 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2008
3991 posts
1273 upvotes
you can't go back in time. when you get an offer, say it's too little after considering additional commute time and responsibilities.
Jr. Member
Jan 10, 2017
188 posts
85 upvotes
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 11:45 am
you can't go back in time. when you get an offer, say it's too little after considering additional commute time and responsibilities.
Don't mention anything until you get an offer.

Honestly, when you provide a salary range, try to ensure your words are as vague as a range: "minimum acceptable range is x - x"; always ensure "minimum" is in your speech. This gives ethical opportunity to push back when an offer is in hand.

These discussions are really based to see how expensive you are. Most roles have some cushion and the purpose of this question is to ensure if you are short-listed, they wont blow their budget with any surprises:

- Said you're range was 80-90
- offer you 85
- you ask 95
- settle on 90; consider additional factors for a higher number, etc.
- 80-90 is a means to start a discussion
- if they could only afford 70-80, they would know ahead of time that you're going to be too expensive.
- this will either mean rejection, or interview and understand 'why'

You just need to understand that it's very rare for companies to rescind an offer if you request too high of a salary. If you're liked, they will try their best to meet IF you're worth it. A lot of people cave and they shouldn't. Job search is all about maximizing your ROI. Even though wages are declining, companies are pretty elastic with their wages if you can push hard enough.

Good luck
Deal Fanatic
Jan 27, 2006
6191 posts
1539 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Depending on the company, they already have a range in mind and if the company is large enough that range is pretty fixed regardless of what you initially said. If a hiring manager wants to offer higher or lower than the established range, then typically in those companies, the offer will need to be reviewed by a committee and the manager will need to justify the higher or lower offer. If that can't be done, the hiring manager would need to redo the job description so that the compensation matches the job.

Where your 'verbal' amount comes into play is to see if everyone is close to the same page and to see if it's worth while for the hiring manager to proceed. Let's say if the amount is too low... it doesn't mean that they will offer you that amount but what it does mean to some companies is if the person is actually qualified to do the work as he is asking for such a low amount compared to what they think is market.

Generally, larger companies get their compensation ranges from salary surveys of other companies in similar industries and job descriptions with an 80% fit (ie. 80% of the job description matches). They will then update those ranges depending on geographical/local issues (ie tight job market) if required.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
9313 posts
1132 upvotes
Toronto
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 11:45 am
you can't go back in time. when you get an offer, say it's too little after considering additional commute time and responsibilities.
This. What the recruiter hears and what the hiring managers is different. If they really like you, they'll do what they can to adjust it higher to the HR. If it's still beyond their control, it means you weren't really meant for the job since you admit it's a downgrade for you.

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