Students

Science programs

Member
Mar 6, 2015
304 posts
16 upvotes
Frankly, let us start from step one. How can a student, mature or fresh almost ready from high school know what subject in post-secondary to study for? Science is interesting, I do agree but what career is ahead? It seems many people are going for medical related ones including nursing, paramedicine or operating medical diagnostic machines such as ultrasound, CT scanning, X-ray etc.. So many posts next door on the topics of Michener, St. Clair, Cambrian colleges already tell the competitive stories to get a toe in the door.
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Member
Sep 2, 2016
220 posts
14 upvotes
crazi wrote:
Feb 17th, 2013 10:28 pm
If you want a job with a science degree, without needing to do a masters, you could go into Geology, Comp Sci, Biological Sciences, Med Lab.

I say this because geology->oilsands, Comp Sci->software development, BioSci->lab tech, MedLab->lab tech.
meteorology too.

Environment and Climate Change Canada's criteria for weather forecaster is a BSc in meteorology.
Member
Mar 6, 2015
304 posts
16 upvotes
frank2243 wrote:
Jun 15th, 2018 8:43 am
meteorology too. Environment and Climate Change Canada's criteria for weather forecaster is a BSc in meteorology.
Is it true that a weather forecaster needs a very high university cGPA during his or her BSc years?
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Member
Sep 2, 2016
220 posts
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frank2243 wrote:
Jun 15th, 2018 8:43 am
meteorology too.

Environment and Climate Change Canada's criteria for weather forecaster is a BSc in meteorology.
cybercavalier wrote:
Jun 15th, 2018 10:39 am
Is it true that a weather forecaster needs a very high university cGPA during his or her BSc years?
Not really. Here is the info for this year training program :
https://emploisfp-psjobs.cfp-psc.gc.ca/ ... er=1110498

Yes. They look at the transcript, but from my experience and what I have heard from friends/colleagues, they hire mostly based on the interview and your performance at the training program. Sometimes someone with a BSc in meteorology with a very high cGPA might not be able to visualize the structure of the atmosphere and all the processes. In this field, there are people better at the forecast and other better at the research.
Newbie
Feb 15, 2018
6 posts
1 upvote
Any recommendations for universities with strong Chemistry programs where you also have a fair chance of getting the gpa necessary for admission to grad school? At the moment Western, Queen's, McMaster, and Waterloo are being considered.
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May 19, 2015
429 posts
132 upvotes
gwnorth68 wrote:
Jul 1st, 2018 12:48 pm
Any recommendations for universities with strong Chemistry programs where you also have a fair chance of getting the gpa necessary for admission to grad school? At the moment Western, Queen's, McMaster, and Waterloo are being considered.
Grad school as in MSc with thesis or professional grad schools like med? If the former, finding a PI willing to pay for your stipend is more important than the B grade needed... a prof can always put pressure for you to be accepted as a special case. At least for UofT St George SGS.

If you’re talking about med school then go to th easiest school you can think of, use your spare time for ECs.
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Feb 15, 2018
6 posts
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Thanks, by grad school I meant M.Sc., not professional programs.
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May 19, 2015
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gwnorth68 wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 9:59 am
Thanks, by grad school I meant M.Sc., not professional programs.
In which case I’d look for the school you’d have the greatest chance of getting a PI. Because even if you get accepted at the grad school level (ie uofts SGS) if you don’t have a PI you won’t be starting grad school. Happened to a friend. They got a PI the year after they applied so they applied to grad school twice and was successful the second time because they were admitted by the school and had a PI. You ultimately need both.
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Feb 15, 2018
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How would you go about assessing the likelihood of getting a PI? When touring UWO I was told by a prof that most students these days do their masters at the same school they did their undergrad, in large part because of having already made connections with a potential thesis advisor. Do you think it's difficult to get accepted into a grad program at a different school from which you did your undergrad?
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May 19, 2015
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gwnorth68 wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 11:58 am
How would you go about assessing the likelihood of getting a PI? When touring UWO I was told by a prof that most students these days do their masters at the same school they did their undergrad, in large part because of having already made connections with a potential thesis advisor. Do you think it's difficult to get accepted into a grad program at a different school from which you did your undergrad?
It depends on the dept. unfortunately I'm not knowledgable about the chemistry field but usually going to a research intensive school like UofT will mean more money and opportunities to go into research vs say Ryerson/York where there seems to be more focus on getting a job after undergrad vs graduate research. Depends on your career goals, if end objective is MSc or PhD and working for a pharm company then maybe a more career focused school might be better (But also consider research prestige and how better ranked research schools might be more competitive in terms of connections etc)... if the goal is to stay in academia then UofT and the like are better.

IN GENERAL, it is easier to say in your undergrad school because you know people. It's a lot harder to convince busy profs to meet with random student from x school not afflicted with them. Only difference is if your research in undergrad (which you have no way of knowing with who and on what topics atm) is relevant to another school and their prof. Ex friend worked on a study in UofG which was affiliated with a new project my prof was working on and because the two profs knew each other she interviewed for and got a spot with my prof for her MSc.

HOWEVER, research is also more competitive in schools like UofT. I dont know anything about you so that's for you to decide but be prepared to gun for it. Grades matter, relationships/networks arguably matter more. Unfortunately research can be very biased (male preference over female in certain fields, archaic prof's and their ways of thinking, personal relationships such as child of a friend and preferential treatment etc). Just do your best.

EDIT: regarding how to get a PI specifically, I don't know you so it's impossible to tell unfortunately... in terms of general school comparisons ask them about undergrad research opportunities. Go to Open Houses and ask the chem dept profs about being interested in research and doing MSc eventually. See their responses. Overall, look at funding their dept gets, more funding means more research and students getting paid (ie MSc and PhD students)
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Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
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The talk of needing to find a PI in the field of Chemistry is not generally applicable. All of the schools gwnorth68 mentioned have good Chemistry programs with strong researchers. You will generally find that, at all of the schools mentioned you'll be doing a 4th year thesis which means you'll already have been in the lab for one year before you even need to pick your MSc area. During this year you'll also get a good view of what the other prof's are researching. Usually during your 4th year is when you'll decide who you want to work for. The good news about doing your MSc is that you will always get paid, the bad news is that the career opportunities in the Science's in Canada are quite limited (especially if you go to the PhD program).
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Nov 24, 2004
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Clacker wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 9:19 pm
The talk of needing to find a PI in the field of Chemistry is not generally applicable. All of the schools gwnorth68 mentioned have good Chemistry programs with strong researchers. You will generally find that, at all of the schools mentioned you'll be doing a 4th year thesis which means you'll already have been in the lab for one year before you even need to pick your MSc area. During this year you'll also get a good view of what the other prof's are researching. Usually during your 4th year is when you'll decide who you want to work for. The good news about doing your MSc is that you will always get paid, the bad news is that the career opportunities in the Science's in Canada are quite limited (especially if you go to the PhD program).
As someone who works in the field, I agree with this comment. The four schools mentioned all have good programs (I might put Queens and Mac above the other two, but it'd be a tough call). You'll get a good undergraduate experience, and as long as your marks aren't abysmal, there will be ample undergrad research opportunities in your final year (this is pretty much essential to grad school admission).

I agree with Clacker that talking about finding a professor to work with when choosing a school for undergrad is putting the cart way before the horse.

My strong recommendation would be to attend a different institution for graduate school -- don't stay at the same school where you did your BSc. I would also recommend doing a co-op program during your BSc if at all possible (which functionally means that you should lean strongly toward Waterloo). Co-ops give you a huge advantage in the job market, even when later followed by a graduate degree.
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
977 posts
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JHW wrote:
Jul 9th, 2018 4:06 pm
My strong recommendation would be to attend a different institution for graduate school -- don't stay at the same school where you did your BSc. I would also recommend doing a co-op program during your BSc if at all possible (which functionally means that you should lean strongly toward Waterloo). Co-ops give you a huge advantage in the job market, even when later followed by a graduate degree.
Totally agree with this, but it seems that most S. Ont schools don't encourage their students to expand their horizons by doing grad school at a different institute. Also, completely agree with trying to get Co-op experience, it makes you MUCH more employable, and will also give you a good idea of areas of science you may prefer vs those you don't.

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