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screwing into a "sheet" of stud?

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  • Dec 12th, 2017 3:59 pm
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CNeufeld wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 6:56 pm
Was there constant resistance for the entire depth of the drill bit? Or did it break through after the drywall?
constant resistance, yes, very slight (typical drywall, i guess?). from my amateur experience/perspective, it didn't feel like there was a change in substance (say, hitting brick or cedar past the dry wall) and certainly nothing stopping me from drilling (metal, etc.)
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AMRadio wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 7:18 pm
constant resistance, yes, very slight (typical drywall, i guess?). from my amateur experience/perspective, it didn't feel like there was a change in substance (say, hitting brick or cedar past the dry wall) and certainly nothing stopping me from drilling (metal, etc.)
Once you poke a hole in the top layer of drywall, see if you can "push" the drill bits in (w/o using a drill or any power tools)
Usually with very small drill bits, you can "push" it into drywall like you can with a needle, but not on plywood or stud.
Not sure about you, but drilling into drywall / plywood / stud feels the same for me when I use a 1/16" bits. There is pretty much no resistant to it due to the small size of the bits and the drill rotation.
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pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 11:09 am
Once you poke a hole in the top layer of drywall, see if you can "push" the drill bits in (w/o using a drill or any power tools)
Usually with very small drill bits, you can "push" it into drywall like you can with a needle, but not on plywood or stud.
Not sure about you, but drilling into drywall / plywood / stud feels the same for me when I use a 1/16" bits. There is pretty much no resistant to it due to the small size of the bits and the drill rotation.
good tip, thx. again, really appreciate: if "home improvement" were a subject, i would have surely failed by now.

i tried two holes: first one let me push the bit in approximately 1 1/4", the second one 1 1/8"

surface layer drywall is 5/8". so maybe there's an additional 5/8" layer of drywall or plaster before "something else."

so basically i've got two options?

1. safer to not drill past this, so use a shorter, coarser drywall screw for our set of individual hooks; nix the shelf on this wall.

2. hope that it's plywood/stud beyond this, drill into it, and go with longer screws
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AMRadio wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 1:23 pm
good tip, thx. again, really appreciate: if "home improvement" were a subject, i would have surely failed by now.

i tried two holes: first one let me push the bit in approximately 1 1/4", the second one 1 1/8"

surface layer drywall is 5/8". so maybe there's an additional 5/8" layer of drywall or plaster before "something else."

so basically i've got two options?

1. safer to not drill past this, so use a shorter, coarser drywall screw for our set of individual hooks; nix the shelf on this wall.

2. hope that it's plywood/stud beyond this, drill into it, and go with longer screws
You can't rely on standard drywall screws to hold any significant amount of weight. You mentioned a shelf in your first post; you need an anchor of some kind.

C
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CNeufeld wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 1:44 pm
You can't rely on standard drywall screws to hold any significant amount of weight. You mentioned a shelf in your first post; you need an anchor of some kind.

C
yeah, i think we're going to forget about the shelf on this wall.

for the lighter duty hooks, i'm still planning on using plastic anchors with shorter screws for inch or so drywall layer(s) -- basically not gonna deal with the stud/plywood/brick/unknown behind it.

this SHOULD work, right?
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AMRadio wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 5:42 pm
yeah, i think we're going to forget about the shelf on this wall.

for the lighter duty hooks, i'm still planning on using plastic anchors with shorter screws for inch or so drywall layer(s) -- basically not gonna deal with the stud/plywood/brick/unknown behind it.

this SHOULD work, right?
I use something like this if it is going to hold anything > 5lbs.
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.14-t ... 540135.htm
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can't use a toggle on this wall, as most of it isn't hollow (according to my studfinder)
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That wall is likey double thickness drywall (2 layers of drywall). Some places do this to meet fire resistance requirements.

What room is on the other side?
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l69norm wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 5:25 pm
That wall is likey double thickness drywall (2 layers of drywall). Some places do this to meet fire resistance requirements.

What room is on the other side?
not sure. it's behind double metal doors, and locked. there's one on each floor, in the same place.

electrical? hydro meters? don't know what. however each suite has its own breaker box, cable box, water shutoff

edit: it's the "Electrical Closet"
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AMRadio wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 6:52 pm
..
edit: it's the "Electrical Closet"
My speculation is it's double layers of drywall for fire resistance that are bridging across an internal partition. At work, we have something similar where double layer drywall separates different fire zones (i.e. office, storage, maintenance, etc..)

It's there either to:
a) keep flames from spreading from your unit into the other room
or
b) keep flames from spreading from the other room into your unit.

You are probably right not to drill anymore holes into that portion of the wall
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l69norm wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 9:10 pm
My speculation is it's double layers of drywall for fire resistance that are bridging across an internal partition. At work, we have something similar where double layer drywall separates different fire zones (i.e. office, storage, maintenance, etc..)

It's there either to:
a) keep flames from spreading from your unit into the other room
or
b) keep flames from spreading from the other room into your unit.

You are probably right not to drill anymore holes into that portion of the wall
it's funny that when i bought this place, one of the first things i wanted to do was knock down this section of wall for a closet/storage.

NOPE.

thanks for all your insight, everyone. for sure, gonna nix the shelf. we will mount five individual hooks in the area (it'll be for coats and what not, less than 10lbs a hook for sure) but only using shorter screws that go in the first layer of drywall only. will use shorter plastic anchors as well.

in other words, i'm not going to drill past (or into, if i can help it) that second layer of drywall.


edit ----------------------

installed the individual hooks using 1" size 6 screws, with 1" plastic anchors. marked the 3/8" drill bit with tape, so that i wouldn't penetrate past that point.

first eight holes/four hooks went in as expected: just dry wall, and only white residue on the bit and on my dust catcher.

i ended up installing one more hook in a section that wasn't reinforced. dry wall there was only 5/8" thick, and along i pulled out a bit of insulation with the drill.

anyhow, hooks are up, and my suite and the hallway are still not on fire, so we're all good.

thanks again for everyone's help!
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engineered wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 9:04 am
Maybe it's a duct, and your magnet isn't strong enough to pick it up?
There should be a heat register or something of a cool air return duct in the vicinity then.
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Now we're all curious. resign yourself to patching a dime sized hole, find a friend who owns a borescope and find out once and for all what's in there.

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