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Second Career!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Oct 11th, 2012 3:38 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto

Second Career!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hello Everyone !!!!!!

I am new to this forum. I have been on EI since April, 2012. I am considering doing a 2 year diploma through a community college in Network Admin.

I am a single person earning in a household. My EI is for a limited period ( untill april next year) of time and i am wondering what happens when EI is finished. Do second career support your income.?

Please advise me that should i consider second career if i am single person earning in a household.

Thanks in advance.
26 replies
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Feb 23, 2008
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Moved to careers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Nothing is true, everything is permitted - Ezio Auditore.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto
What do you mean?

mrperfect wrote:
Oct 9th, 2012 6:13 pm
Moved to careers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Deal Fanatic
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Jun 11, 2001
7697 posts
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Tech support field is pretty saturated (ie, tough to get support jobs and low pay), but if you got passion for that stuff go for it. Been doing it for 11yrs now.
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[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto
I don't have experience in tech support. i use computer at work so i have just basic computer knowledge. Do you think that is enough to do any tech support course?

Which tech support course would you recommend if a person has no tech background?
sleepyguy wrote:
Oct 9th, 2012 11:48 pm
Tech support field is pretty saturated (ie, tough to get support jobs and low pay), but if you got passion for that stuff go for it. Been doing it for 11yrs now.
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Aug 22, 2009
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gagan4580 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 10:54 am
I don't have experience in tech support. i use computer at work so i have just basic computer knowledge. Do you think that is enough to do any tech support course?

Which tech support course would you recommend if a person has no tech background?
sleepyguy said that tech support is pretty saturated, and it doesn't sound like you really have a "passion" for it if you only have basic computer knowledge. Based off his post, it only sounds like you would be successful if you are like one of those "techie" guys who loves reading up on the latest and greatest tech improvements and the guys at Canada Computers know you by name :P

Your first career is in bookkeeping -- are you only considering a career change because you can't find another bookkeeping position, or because you hated that job and want to do something new? Bookkeeping is pretty general, and there are tonnes of companies that require bookkeepers, so I would think that there should be plenty of jobs in that field?
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2117 posts
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Second Career is primarily designed for workers affected from certain industries....book keeping isn't one of them.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto
yeah you are right!!! there are plenty of jobs in this field but do you know that a normal office administrator can also do book-keeping and you'll find most of the females in Admin position. I have been looking for a job since 5 months. that what the second career means if you are not able to find a job in your own field, look for a different career.

And another thing about the word "passion". If the people have no tech background, it doesn't mean that they don't have passion for it. Don't make assumptions. If a person has not tech background, then only they think of getting a diploma in computers.



VifferFun wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 10:59 am
sleepyguy said that tech support is pretty saturated, and it doesn't sound like you really have a "passion" for it if you only have basic computer knowledge. Based off his post, it only sounds like you would be successful if you are like one of those "techie" guys who loves reading up on the latest and greatest tech improvements and the guys at Canada Computers know you by name :P

Your first career is in bookkeeping -- are you only considering a career change because you can't find another bookkeeping position, or because you hated that job and want to do something new? Bookkeeping is pretty general, and there are tonnes of companies that require bookkeepers, so I would think that there should be plenty of jobs in that field?
VifferFun wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 10:59 am
sleepyguy said that tech support is pretty saturated, and it doesn't sound like you really have a "passion" for it if you only have basic computer knowledge. Based off his post, it only sounds like you would be successful if you are like one of those "techie" guys who loves reading up on the latest and greatest tech improvements and the guys at Canada Computers know you by name :P

Your first career is in bookkeeping -- are you only considering a career change because you can't find another bookkeeping position, or because you hated that job and want to do something new? Bookkeeping is pretty general, and there are tonnes of companies that require bookkeepers, so I would think that there should be plenty of jobs in that field?
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto
Sorry, where do you find that list which says that?
bhrm wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 11:24 am
Second Career is primarily designed for workers affected from certain industries....book keeping isn't one of them.
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Aug 22, 2009
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gagan4580 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 11:26 am
And another thing about the word "passion". If the people have no tech background, it doesn't mean that they don't have passion for it. Don't make assumptions. If a person has not tech background, then only they think of getting a diploma in computers.
I didn't mean that in a negative way. Would you say that someone has a passion for soccer if they don't even know how the game is played? If you have a "passion" for something, you LOVE it and take every opportunity to learn about it and do things related to it on your free time. You don't develop a passion by taking a course. Since you have no tech background, I can assume that you don't LOVE it, or you would already have a pretty vast knowledge from the research that you do on your free time.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 7, 2012
23 posts
Toronto
It doesn't make sense to me. Sorry, this debate is not going anywhere. Sorry if it sounds rude but here is the thing. I started with a different question. Please read my first part.

If we are talking on career, here is what i have to say.


There are numerous forums about career change. When you pass your grade 12, a person has no background. A person has to choose a high demand career and slowly and gradually, they learn that. However, there are some exceptions to this (if they are unable to understand). That can happen to anyone. It's just like if you are positive about it and have it in the mind that you can do it.

So, it sounds like if a person has no tech background but has basic computer knowledge, they shouldn't be doing it. Then, what does a Second Career mean? According to me, second career means that if you are not able to find a job in your first career, moove on to a different career. Afcourse you don't have to love your second career and had a passion for in the past, then only you can make wonders. I am not saying that I was a doctor and now I want to pursue any engineering related course. You never know that you would be succesfull in your first career.

VifferFun wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 11:37 am
I didn't mean that in a negative way. Would you say that someone has a passion for soccer if they don't even know how the game is played? If you have a "passion" for something, you LOVE it and take every opportunity to learn about it and do things related to it on your free time. You don't develop a passion by taking a course. Since you have no tech background, I can assume that you don't LOVE it, or you would already have a pretty vast knowledge from the research that you do on your free time.
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User avatar
Aug 22, 2009
374 posts
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gagan4580 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2012 12:34 pm
It doesn't make sense to me. Sorry, this debate is not going anywhere. Sorry if it sounds rude but here is the thing. I started with a different question. Please read my first part.

If we are talking on career, here is what i have to say.


There are numerous forums about career change. When you pass your grade 12, a person has no background. A person has to choose a high demand career and slowly and gradually, they learn that. However, there are some exceptions to this (if they are unable to understand). That can happen to anyone. It's just like if you are positive about it and have it in the mind that you can do it.

So, it sounds like if a person has no tech background but has basic computer knowledge, they shouldn't be doing it. Then, what does a Second Career mean? According to me, second career means that if you are not able to find a job in your first career, moove on to a different career. Afcourse you don't have to love your second career and had a passion for in the past, then only you can make wonders. I am not saying that I was a doctor and now I want to pursue any engineering related course. You never know that you would be succesfull in your first career.
Of course, you can do whatever you want to do; however, sleepyguy works in the field and said that you won't be successful unless you're passionate about it. I get the impression that tech doesn't really interest you all that much; if it did, then you would have more than a "basic understanding" of computers. If there are tonnes of qualified candidates out there who live and breath tech yet have trouble finding a job, how do you expect to compete with these people for jobs? It would suck to study a field that doesn't really interest you, not get a job, and then have to move on to your third career choice.

This really goes for anyone -- unless you pursue a career in what you love and enjoy, your chance of success is limited. I'm not trying to be negative here.
Deal Addict
Dec 31, 2007
3584 posts
439 upvotes
Richmond Hill
What you should be asking yourself is this: do I have skills and assets that are appealing to a company?

The above question is the basis for any person looking to join the workforce. If you have, then you'll have work. If you don't, then you won't have work.

Subsequent questions can then be used to drive the discussion and direction that you need to go based on your answer.

Ex:
If you answered yes, here are some questions you should ask:
- I have the skills, but no one's hiring me, why?
- Why aren't I getting interviews?
etc.

If you answered no, here are some questions you should ask:
- What skills do I need to get hired?
- What do companies want?
- What skills am I best suited for? (ie don't try to pursue a career as a NBA player if you're not physically capable).
- How do I acquire these skills? Do I take a course? Invest in post-secondary?

The number of careers you have/pursue is not relevant. The number of earners in your household is also irrelevant - if you need money, you need money, and that means you need a job - regardless of how many people are working in your household.
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