Automotive

Selling a Used Car "AS IS" without safety/e-test, what's the procedure...

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  • Mar 22nd, 2009 10:51 am
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Newbie
Oct 12, 2006
50 posts
Ottawa

Selling a Used Car "AS IS" without safety/e-test, what's the procedure...

Hello,

I looked at the MTO website but couldn't find the answers to my specific questions/concerns...

I have an old car that still runs/drives fine (1994) at 180k but need to get rid of it now as I recently purchased a new one.

There are a few things that I know need to get fixed/repaired before it can be safetied (brakes, rusted fuel line leak, horn broken etc...) that I do not intend to do as the seller.

My questions are:
1. What is the proper procedure in selling a car "as is"? Is it just buying the UVIP package and signing the vehicle transfer?

2. When I sell the car "as is", should I remove the plates and cancel insurance.

3. When I do the above, can the buyer drive the car to his/her place/mechanic or he/she will need to tow it there?

4. To transfer the ownership, does the buyer need to safety/e-test car before being able to obtain ownership at the driver/licensing office? or they can still transfer ownership w/o safety certificate and register car unplated?

5. Does the buyer need insurance to register/transfer ownership?

Thanks in advance.
9 replies
Deal Expert
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Nov 19, 2005
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1. Selling as is, is as is, they give you money and you give them ownership.

2. If you aren't using the car anymore, you can remove the plates and cancel the insurance, otherwise, you remove plates and cancel insurance upon the sale of your car.

3. You can drive the car to his or her place or mechanic if your car is still insured and plated. Else, it will have to be towed.

4. They can transfer ownership to themselves as unplated unfit.

5. The buyer needs insurance if he/she wants to plate the car.

your welcome.
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Deal Addict
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Mar 10, 2009
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I got a few questions if you don't mind answering if you haven't got a buyer yet:

How much are you looking to sell it? and where are you located? will it be able to pass safety and e-test?

Just wondering because I want to get winter beater car or a car to drive downtown.
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May 10, 2005
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Ottawa
Still go get the sellers package from MTO. Also make out 2 loosley worded contract that states that you are selling the car, as is, where is, with no guarantees on the the car. Also write in that the buyer is responsible for the car form this point forward and that he agrees to transfer the ownership at the MTO a soon as possible. Get the person to print his name and address, verify by photo ID. Both of you sign and date the the documents, you keep one and he keeps one. Immediatley call your insurance company.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 12, 2006
50 posts
Ottawa
win-star wrote:
Mar 21st, 2009 11:37 am
I got a few questions if you don't mind answering if you haven't got a buyer yet:

How much are you looking to sell it? and where are you located? will it be able to pass safety and e-test?

Just wondering because I want to get winter beater car or a car to drive downtown.

Thanks again for the very helpful input AzN_RiverdaleCI and Pete_Coach. The contract draft is a good suggestion for "as is" sales as there is not much mention of this or where to even write it on the Bill of Sale portion of the UVIP.


win-star,

I am located in Ottawa. The vehicle is a 1994 civic 4dr (178k). It drives fine and e-test should be fine, but the safety is the problem.

Some things that need to be fixed:
-small fuel line leak from rusted lines
-brakes need to be serviced
-horn does not work

Those are the main things I can think of for it to pass safety. Other than that, I had this car since 2001 and it has been fine, use it for mainly going to school and back.

Compared to others in the market, I think maybe 700-1000 is reasonable... Probably best if you know a mechanic willing to do the repairs for cheap.

If I don't find a potential buyer, I'll probably end up using the Retire Your Ride program and get 300 cash.
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May 7, 2008
1061 posts
You need a sellers package to sell a vehicle even if its an older vehicle, any buyer will expect a sellers package.

It seem that the vehicle needs more repairs than what its worth, do you expect to get paid or are you paying to have it taken away.

Signing over an ownership without actually transferring the vehicle would at least require some form of "sales agreement" between the seller and buyer.

Any vehicle that becomes "unfit" can become a challenge to turn into a "fit" vehicle...keeping in mind that the "seller" is the one that turns a vehicle "unfit" not the buyer.

Its not in the sellers best interest to have a "fit" vehicle become "unfit" while its transferred.

You don't even want to think about the remote possibility of having the "fit" vehicle that you sold turn into an "unfit" vehicle and suddenly its gets involved in some sort of accident, everyone runs for cover looking for someone to blame as to why a vehicle that is "unfit" is on the road.
Member
Jan 12, 2007
296 posts
22 upvotes
Orleans
Any time you sell a car privately, be sure to

1) Get and keep copies of the bill of sale and used vehicle sellers package.
2) Report the car to the MTO as 'sold'.

If you're wondering why, here is a true story.

A friend sold a car to a stranger 'as-is' and just signed the ownership and delivered the car to the guys house. He thought that was the end of it.

Nearly six months later, he gets a bill from an impound lot for almost a thousand dollars for storage and towing of 'his' car. The seller never transfered the car at the MTO, got a few tickets and eventually the car got impounded by the city. Since the ownership never got transfered, the old owner was stuck with all the charges. Of course, the stranger was nowhere to be found.

There is a note the MTO can put in the computer system that essentially removes your name from the vehicle as of a certain date. After that, if something bad happens to the car, it's no longer your problem.

Just think of all the problems that could happen if some stranger drives around without valid plates or insurance in a car that the MTO still has registered to your name. All that for an old junker you sold for a few hundred bucks.

God forbid they commit a crime, you could be in for some serious legal troubles.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 12, 2006
50 posts
Ottawa
AGR-1 wrote:
Mar 21st, 2009 2:43 pm
You need a sellers package to sell a vehicle even if its an older vehicle, any buyer will expect a sellers package.

It seem that the vehicle needs more repairs than what its worth, do you expect to get paid or are you paying to have it taken away.

Signing over an ownership without actually transferring the vehicle would at least require some form of "sales agreement" between the seller and buyer.

Any vehicle that becomes "unfit" can become a challenge to turn into a "fit" vehicle...keeping in mind that the "seller" is the one that turns a vehicle "unfit" not the buyer.

Its not in the sellers best interest to have a "fit" vehicle become "unfit" while its transferred.

You don't even want to think about the remote possibility of having the "fit" vehicle that you sold turn into an "unfit" vehicle and suddenly its gets involved in some sort of accident, everyone runs for cover looking for someone to blame as to why a vehicle that is "unfit" is on the road.

Well, if there is interest in this vehicle, I wouldn't mind selling it privately for whatever it is worth. But if it takes too much time, I would probably use a recycler/wrecker and get it over with.

So I guess the best thing for me to do as a "seller" even before listing the car is to first cancel the insurance, and then change the vehicle status to "unfit"?

That way I guess if someone is interested and buys it, they can only tow it away to their destination.

97gst wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2009 4:42 am
Any time you sell a car privately, be sure to

1) Get and keep copies of the bill of sale and used vehicle sellers package.
2) Report the car to the MTO as 'sold'.

If you're wondering why, here is a true story.

A friend sold a car to a stranger 'as-is' and just signed the ownership and delivered the car to the guys house. He thought that was the end of it.

Nearly six months later, he gets a bill from an impound lot for almost a thousand dollars for storage and towing of 'his' car. The seller never transfered the car at the MTO, got a few tickets and eventually the car got impounded by the city. Since the ownership never got transfered, the old owner was stuck with all the charges. Of course, the stranger was nowhere to be found.

There is a note the MTO can put in the computer system that essentially removes your name from the vehicle as of a certain date. After that, if something bad happens to the car, it's no longer your problem.

Just think of all the problems that could happen if some stranger drives around without valid plates or insurance in a car that the MTO still has registered to your name. All that for an old junker you sold for a few hundred bucks.

God forbid they commit a crime, you could be in for some serious legal troubles.

Hmm... that is a good point, I can imagine these things can happen. I guess I will have to contact MTO at the earliest and get them to note this on their computer. Will save those headaches in the future.
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Nov 19, 2005
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zymcpcp wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2009 9:40 am
So I guess the best thing for me to do as a "seller" even before listing the car is to first cancel the insurance, and then change the vehicle status to "unfit"?
When you sell the vehicle or transfer as is to a buyer, and they register it under their name /w out the safety cert, it's auto unfit.
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Nov 12, 2006
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AzN_RiverdaleCI wrote:
Mar 21st, 2009 10:26 am

2. If you aren't using the car anymore, you can remove the plates and cancel the insurance, otherwise, you remove plates and cancel insurance upon the sale of your car.

3. You can drive the car to his or her place or mechanic if your car is still insured and plated. Else, it will have to be towed.

.
:arrowu: Some bad advice

2) Do not remove the insurance on the car. Leave it on for tests drives or change it to "fire and theft" call your insurance guy to find out the best/cheapest way.

3) Once ownership is transferred the buyer can get a temp trip permit that will allow them to drive it for repairs/safety for 10 days.

SM
PS the poster did not know what the "T" plate sticker was so they may not be that experienced.
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