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  • Sep 11th, 2019 8:06 am
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Sr. Member
Nov 25, 2008
622 posts
16 upvotes
edmonton

setting up a will

Is Will kit at staples the most cost-effective way to do a will ?

I got two children, i want to ensure in case of accidents, all my assets belong to my wife, and if in case accident to both parents, assets belong 100% to my children.
I assume i will need at least 1 will exectioner while my children are not over 18 years old.

Thanks
TC
41 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1602 posts
856 upvotes
I am not a huge fan of Will Kits. I remember my professor who was a lawyer gave many reasons why there aren’t the best idea. They are better than nothing, but I feel if you have kids, you should get one done properly. Since you don’t know what you don’t

Some considerations:
  • If both parents pass, who has guardianship of the kids? Make sure you name one person, not a couple (what if they get divorced)
  • You need an executor under all circumstances. You need to name them. Are they joint executors, or does one proceed each other. Will you provide an executor fee?
  • Are there any constraints to the distributions if you both die. They just get 100% at 18. This may be fine for a small estate? Do you want an 18 who hasn’t guidance from their dead parents to have full control? Maybe, or maybe not?
  • What about a Personal Directive? What happens if you are still alive but incapacitated (wills are not the same as a PD). Who makes those decisions? What about a Power of Attorney? Does the will kit cover this?
  • What happens if your whole family gets wiped out? Who does the estate go to.
There other things that the lawyer can help you go through.

In my case, I am so happy that my parents had a lawyer properly draft up their will. Some weird things happened to my parents and I had to inact the Power of Attorney and personal directive. As the POA, it was stressful under circumstances. Our lawyers walked me through each step and made it so much easier. Well worth the initial cost of the wills way back.

My family really gets along, but if you have family or people that will try and contest the will, you may want to make sure it's done properly.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2011
961 posts
634 upvotes
HAMILTON
It is not that expensive to use a lawyer to draw up a will.

They will ask all the pertinent questions that you need to cover and it will be correct with all the bases covered.

Don't cheap out especially if you have children.

We had some challenges when the MIL passed away with a will that was difficult and challenging to deal with.

So much so that the wife and I went to a lawyer and had our done correctly and completely which will save our kids a lot of grief on our passing
Sr. Member
User avatar
Mar 27, 2011
685 posts
359 upvotes
Toronto
I was thinking of setting up my will through Om Will. From what understand the wills (even those provided by lawyers), are typically templated?
Sr. Member
Sep 24, 2006
732 posts
66 upvotes
If you don't mind me asking, how much did it cost to get your will done?
luckystrike1 wrote:
May 3rd, 2019 4:29 pm
It is not that expensive to use a lawyer to draw up a will.

They will ask all the pertinent questions that you need to cover and it will be correct with all the bases covered.

Don't cheap out especially if you have children.

We had some challenges when the MIL passed away with a will that was difficult and challenging to deal with.

So much so that the wife and I went to a lawyer and had our done correctly and completely which will save our kids a lot of grief on our passing
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2011
961 posts
634 upvotes
HAMILTON
for the 2 of us was a couple hundred. We had multiple property issues to deal with, 2 adult children and 2 grandkids to work out all the details.
Jr. Member
Nov 24, 2014
121 posts
68 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I had mine done though a lawyer, but it did seem that they do it so often that there is a "template" of sorts .
That said it (and lawyer) addressed a bunch of stuff that I didn't think of such as:
- Wife and I had to do full power of attorney for each other so in event of something one of us could at least " get stuff done"
-also had to address "living will" issues (ie desire to have plug pulled in event of certain medical circumstances etc)
- options for multiple guardians in order or preference (ie first second, third, choices)
- Conditions that the inheritance would go to the kids and not their spouses, (in event of divorces) but that their kids would be eligible.
- things like that

It was only a couple of hundred bucks, but i feel it was worth it getting it done correctly.
plus they got it registered and stuff too
Newbie
Jun 5, 2018
19 posts
6 upvotes
I am working on this right now, and I'd just advise that you get quotes from a few different lawyers, because prices can be drastically different place to place.
Deal Addict
May 23, 2017
1546 posts
670 upvotes
redcase wrote:
May 9th, 2019 2:42 pm
I am working on this right now, and I'd just advise that you get quotes from a few different lawyers, because prices can be drastically different place to place.
if you find a good place can you please let me know. I am in the process of looking as well
Got that Zoomer account!
Deal Addict
May 23, 2017
1546 posts
670 upvotes
dieseldub wrote:
May 9th, 2019 2:04 pm
I had mine done though a lawyer, but it did seem that they do it so often that there is a "template" of sorts .
That said it (and lawyer) addressed a bunch of stuff that I didn't think of such as:
- Wife and I had to do full power of attorney for each other so in event of something one of us could at least " get stuff done"
-also had to address "living will" issues (ie desire to have plug pulled in event of certain medical circumstances etc)
- options for multiple guardians in order or preference (ie first second, third, choices)
- Conditions that the inheritance would go to the kids and not their spouses, (in event of divorces) but that their kids would be eligible.
- things like that

It was only a couple of hundred bucks, but i feel it was worth it getting it done correctly.
plus they got it registered and stuff too
Can you please PM me with the lawyers info?
Got that Zoomer account!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1513 posts
192 upvotes
Markham, ON
I have no clue how old everyone is on this forum.
A will to care for a minor could be very simple. Get a few friends you can count on and those could be the potential guardians. They are to freeze up your asset if you are dead. How much does it cost to care for your child? No one knows the full potential of your child. But you do want someone to be a good model, someone able to provide guidance, someone to provide shelter. List your choices and rank them and make sure everybody knows and understand. Chances are nothing is going to happen to you until your kids are adults.

Preparing a will for when you are much older and your children are no longer children may be more confusing. Who knows how much you will really have left when it's time to really kick the bucket. While preparing your will, always go in with the best intention and best case scenario. Where do you want to be when it's really time to go, how do you imagine you will leave. I would go about it that way.

That document may be read and hear many times over.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1602 posts
856 upvotes
Poppwl wrote:
May 11th, 2019 10:59 am
I have no clue how old everyone is on this forum.
A will to care for a minor could be very simple. Get a few friends you can count on and those could be the potential guardians. They are to freeze up your asset if you are dead. How much does it cost to care for your child? No one knows the full potential of your child. But you do want someone to be a good model, someone able to provide guidance, someone to provide shelter. List your choices and rank them and make sure everybody knows and understand. Chances are nothing is going to happen to you until your kids are adults.

Preparing a will for when you are much older and your children are no longer children may be more confusing. Who knows how much you will really have left when it's time to really kick the bucket. While preparing your will, always go in with the best intention and best case scenario. Where do you want to be when it's really time to go, how do you imagine you will leave. I would go about it that way.

That document may be read and hear many times over.
I normally am not as harsh I am going to be, so I apologize in advice. This is the WORST AND MOST IRRESPONSIBLE ADVICE EVER!!!!! I know you don't have kids, but I hope NO ONE SHOULD LISTEN TO YOUR ADVICE if they care about their children.

A will is a MUST if you have minor children. In fact is it more important to have a will to care for your kids than if they are adults. You can't just have a verbal agreement amount a 'few friends' to take care of your children when you are dead. The kids need stability especially when their parents have died. You don't have a group of friends or relatives no matter how caring bounce them around. They are not pets that you put somewhere else when you are on vacation or something. If you want your friends to take care of them, then you talk to them, and you have a back up or two listed in order in case something happens to you first set of friends. All of this must be put into a will. If not, the state will put your kids to next of kin and that may or may not be whom you want even if you asked someone else. I can't believe one think that a will is more important when they are adults, these are your kids that you are sending somewhere, who gives a crap about the money relatively speaking.

Secondly, without a will, the estate gets frozen automatically into probate. Again, the money may not be around for your kids until it gets all worked out. In a will, you can smartly set up an estate or have your executor ensure there is enough for the kids. A will can separate the executor from the guardians to have special checks and balances to make sure your kids are taken care of.

Most importantly, you may be right that most kids will become adults before their parents pass, but if they don't, and you don't have a will, you have essentially screwed your child. This is pretty raw, as this last week, my child's good friend's mother passed away. The kid is a young teen, with no dad. The mother wasn't sick, it wasn't an accident, it was really sudden. This is the 5th parent I personally know well that has passed away leaving young kids without a parent. These were all people in their 30's and 40's, so not very old at all.


As an adult child dealing with a terminal parent right now, I can assure you that them having their legal documents in order has been a god send in such stressful times. It would be irresponsible to follow such flippant advice above.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1513 posts
192 upvotes
Markham, ON
Macx2mommy wrote:
May 11th, 2019 12:26 pm
I normally am not as harsh I am going to be, so I apologize in advice. This is the WORST AND MOST IRRESPONSIBLE ADVICE EVER!!!!! I know you don't have kids, but I hope NO ONE SHOULD LISTEN TO YOUR ADVICE if they care about their children.

A will is a MUST if you have minor children. In fact is it more important to have a will to care for your kids than if they are adults. You can't just have a verbal agreement amount a 'few friends' to take care of your children when you are dead. The kids need stability especially when their parents have died. You don't have a group of friends or relatives no matter how caring bounce them around. They are not pets that you put somewhere else when you are on vacation or something. If you want your friends to take care of them, then you talk to them, and you have a back up or two listed in order in case something happens to you first set of friends. All of this must be put into a will. If not, the state will put your kids to next of kin and that may or may not be whom you want even if you asked someone else. I can't believe one think that a will is more important when they are adults, these are your kids that you are sending somewhere, who gives a crap about the money relatively speaking.

Secondly, without a will, the estate gets frozen automatically into probate. Again, the money may not be around for your kids until it gets all worked out. In a will, you can smartly set up an estate or have your executor ensure there is enough for the kids. A will can separate the executor from the guardians to have special checks and balances to make sure your kids are taken care of.

Most importantly, you may be right that most kids will become adults before their parents pass, but if they don't, and you don't have a will, you have essentially screwed your child. This is pretty raw, as this last week, my child's good friend's mother passed away. The kid is a young teen, with no dad. The mother wasn't sick, it wasn't an accident, it was really sudden. This is the 5th parent I personally know well that has passed away leaving young kids without a parent. These were all people in their 30's and 40's, so not very old at all.


As an adult child dealing with a terminal parent right now, I can assure you that them having their legal documents in order has been a god send in such stressful times. It would be irresponsible to follow such flippant advice above.
I quoted you because I didn't even read what you wrote. I would recommend rereading what I wrote before writing long passage about what I wrote.

You need to find people willing to carry out your will that's why it's better to know who among your friend is willing to do as you say.

There is no point of having a document when you don't know if you can rely on the person to carry out your will.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1513 posts
192 upvotes
Markham, ON
Poppwl wrote:
May 11th, 2019 10:59 am
I have no clue how old everyone is on this forum.
A will to care for a minor could be very simple. Get a few friends you can count on and those could be the potential guardians. They are to freeze up your asset if you are dead. How much does it cost to care for your child? No one knows the full potential of your child. But you do want someone to be a good model, someone able to provide guidance, someone to provide shelter. List your choices and rank them and make sure everybody knows and understand. Chances are nothing is going to happen to you until your kids are adults.

Preparing a will for when you are much older and your children are no longer children may be more confusing. Who knows how much you will really have left when it's time to really kick the bucket. While preparing your will, always go in with the best intention and best case scenario. Where do you want to be when it's really time to go, how do you imagine you will leave. I would go about it that way.

That document may be read and hear many times over.
I quoted you again. I said chances are you won't die before your kid becomes an adult because you are a safe person. You put yourself out of danger. The paper is just an extra document that you don't need.

Calm down. Relax. Why are adults angry all the time.
Deal Addict
May 12, 2014
2010 posts
1434 upvotes
Montreal
love0715 wrote:
May 2nd, 2019 12:53 pm
Is Will kit at staples the most cost-effective way to do a will ?
No. Hiring a lawyer and paying upfront is the most cost effective way.

It only looks cheaper to use a will kit and "do it yourself" because someone else will pay a higher price later.

Exception: you have no kids and you are leaving everything to your wife. Fine. Do a will kit.

You have minor children? You are planning on having more than one heir? You have complex assets (eg your own business)? Use a lawyer.

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