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  • Oct 12th, 2019 3:52 pm
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Deal Fanatic
Feb 7, 2017
9934 posts
7220 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Poppwl wrote:
May 11th, 2019 12:35 pm
I quoted you again. I said chances are you won't die before your kid becomes an adult because you are a safe person. You put yourself out of danger. The paper is just an extra document that you don't need.
Agree with @Macx2mommy this is some of the worst advice ever on planning for what might happen if a Parent should pass on early, while kids are still minors (or even say under 25, completing their education)
Calm down. Relax. Why are adults angry all the time.
Wait what ?

I take it this means you are not even an adult yourself yet

:facepalm:

Definitely puts your posts in a whole new perspective for me
Deal Addict
May 23, 2017
1658 posts
757 upvotes
no8t4 wrote:
Jun 5th, 2019 7:17 pm
How about south Brampton? Or is that too far?
nope not too far. let me know
Got that Zoomer account!
Deal Addict
May 23, 2017
1658 posts
757 upvotes
zhiccup wrote:
Jun 6th, 2019 10:53 pm
Our lawyer is at Square One area if you are interested. We did our will and power of attorney with this lawyer.
please let me know the details
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Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1513 posts
192 upvotes
Markham, ON
Macx2mommy wrote:
May 22nd, 2019 9:49 am
A will is like insurance, you don't need one until you do. Having go to go through a POA and PD personally, and witnessing the effects if a parent no longer able to make decisions or dies on a family and kids, I think it is well worth it for the $500-$1000 to have a will, PD, and POA drafted for a couple with kids. That's with my spouse and I being in a stable relationship for 20+ years, no other marriages, children/step children, etc. If you have any accounts or investments that are only in your name, and they are not set up properly, then a will may help.
Even if it's just your spouse that dies without a will, there are more steps the surviving spouse has to take through the courts.

I would disagree, unless the family is very dysfunctional, a parents wishes is very important in terms of custody. Courts don't arbitrarily decide one family member is better than another. There needs to be reason. If you don't have a will, and both parents die, there is no one named. That's when thinks get really hairy even if your whole family is wonderful, kids can get bounced around.

My response stands as it was that it's stupid to think that if you lead a 'safe life' you will not die unexpectedly. I also think it is really irresponsible to not have a will and just get some friends together ask them to figure how to raise your kids. If you don't have kids, or have a simple estate that everyone agrees to, then save the money. If everything works out, great, if not, then it's fine too, you are dead, who cares how the kids and family have to deal with this.
I hate how a bunch of people misinterpreted what I wrote. I initially wrote that you should ask friends because you want to determine who is willing to execute your will for you if you are dead. Good luck trying to get a friend to execute your will for you when you are dead and they don't actually understand the will you set up yet they are named as guardians, etc. Etc.

Yes, I know they can always decline and them some professional could take over.

My point was. It's better to stay alive and be safe. It's better to not need that paperwork at all.

Everyone just have to sound like an adult on a forum. Please.
Newbie
Aug 3, 2005
81 posts
26 upvotes
Vancouver
Did any of you decide to not include family members as potential guardians in your will or maybe not ranked high on the list? We are debating doing that for personal reasons but I can see it becoming a huge issue if the family members found out.
Jr. Member
Nov 24, 2014
121 posts
69 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Jovo wrote:
Jun 13th, 2019 1:28 pm
Did any of you decide to not include family members as potential guardians in your will or maybe not ranked high on the list? We are debating doing that for personal reasons but I can see it becoming a huge issue if the family members found out.
It shouldn't matter as it's your decision who you think/determine would be the best guardians for your kids.
That said you should talk to the potential guardians to see if they would even be willing/able to be guardians. (even with money it will be a lot of work and responsibility)

In our case we totally left out a brother in law since while close to the family, would be completely crappy as a guardian. We ended up listing my sister and her husband as two separate options (in case they get divorced) but since their kids are cousins to ours, we figured they'd appreciate the family connection. We also didn't include our parents since they are in their 80's and would be unable to raise two kids under 6 in their current state.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 8, 2007
1772 posts
183 upvotes
Mississauga
Jovo wrote:
Jun 13th, 2019 1:28 pm
Did any of you decide to not include family members as potential guardians in your will or maybe not ranked high on the list? We are debating doing that for personal reasons but I can see it becoming a huge issue if the family members found out.
Yep similar to previous poster we excluded a close family member (sibling) who's not in the best personal position and not the best judgement in favor of other siblings who are closer and in a better position. Also excluded the grandparents who are in their 70s.

The conversation was awkward but explained logically didn't cause too many ripples (that I know of anyway). If someone reacts badly, that'll just reinforce why they weren't the best choice.
Deal Addict
Nov 10, 2018
2445 posts
2408 upvotes
For those of you perusing this thread who may be contemplating marriage, retain a lawyer. Many of the legal will kits I have seen do not have any provisions for marriage and without those provisions, your will is on shaky ground, at best, and at worst, not worth the paper it's written on and it's more likely than not the latter!

If you are already married, and you want something versus nothing, then OK, fine - but as others have said, retain a lawyer. It's not expensive for a lawyer to write a will. Shop around. Lawyers are like McDonalds' fries specialists these days. There are plenty around who are looking for work.
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 7, 2017
9934 posts
7220 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
angryaudifanatic wrote:
Jun 22nd, 2019 9:58 am
For those of you perusing this thread who may be contemplating marriage, retain a lawyer. Many of the legal will kits I have seen do not have any provisions for marriage and without those provisions, your will is on shaky ground, at best, and at worst, not worth the paper it's written on and it's more likely than not the latter!

If you are already married, and you want something versus nothing, then OK, fine - but as others have said, retain a lawyer. It's not expensive for a lawyer to write a will. Shop around. Lawyers are like McDonalds' fries specialists these days. There are plenty around who are looking for work.
Good post

Our lawyer told us that a Marriage or Divorce is one of the key components that change the validity of a will
Jr. Member
Feb 6, 2011
138 posts
24 upvotes
Hi,

I have two siblings and i'm single. I'm planning to get a will and seek with family lawyer. Aside from the will, i will also need POA and PD?
Can both of my siblings become executors? I'm new to this. I just want to turn over my investments. Prolly, my will is basic.

Appreciate any inputs.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jan 19, 2007
538 posts
163 upvotes
Toronto
tsinoboy wrote:
Sep 10th, 2019 10:31 pm
Hi,

I have two siblings and i'm single. I'm planning to get a will and seek with family lawyer. Aside from the will, i will also need POA and PD?
Can both of my siblings become executors? I'm new to this. I just want to turn over my investments. Prolly, my will is basic.

Appreciate any inputs.
If you go to a lawyer the POA and PD will be (should be) included in the discussion and package as a whole.
Yes, you can name more than one executor as well as backups if you wish as well.
Jr. Member
Apr 5, 2017
111 posts
14 upvotes
Any recommendations for a good lawyer in Durham region for Will preparation ?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 20, 2006
671 posts
9 upvotes
TORONTO
My elderly parents looking to create a will
Where would they do it in toronto?
Can we get one online and then notarize it?
New to this. Thanks for any advise
Deal Addict
May 23, 2017
1658 posts
757 upvotes
MK1986 wrote:
Sep 25th, 2019 11:47 am
Any recommendations for a good lawyer in Durham region for Will preparation ?
im looking for this as well, did you find anyone?
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