Parenting & Family

Should I limit my daughter on her social media usage?

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  • Nov 17th, 2017 6:03 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 14, 2015
32 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto, ON

Should I limit my daughter on her social media usage?

Should I limit my child's usage of social media because she has depression? I read something about social media being a toxic place, so I don't want her to read something and then get triggered. Though, if I do that, I might trigger her by preventing her to connect with her friends in the net. I'm terribly confused on what to do.
25 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 8, 2008
3617 posts
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Toronto
Has she seen a professional for her depression?
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2015
974 posts
364 upvotes
Age?

Yes limit her, doesn’t mean ban her but you can put some some boundaries

More importantly bring her in to see someone.

Our introverted gifted daughter preferred to connect via electronically. So her phone and email seemed like a good Channel for her personality. She was also having girl drama at school. The more drama she had, the more she would retreat o her phone. In working with a consellor, the6 said it reall6 common for kids to use phones as a soothing mechanism, and the6 don’t learn to handle tough situation on their own. It can become a vicious cycle, so the kids get more anxious over time. Our child wasn’t on very, essential just on the bus ride there and back and it was enough to tune out. We notice that she is more moody the more technology she has, and we monitor it very carefully.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
15786 posts
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Ottawa
I also suggest her to see a professional, if she's not willing to open to you guys to discuss her depression.
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 31, 2008
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There's been a significant rise in anxiety, depression, etc. since smart phones took off about 8 years ago. This was said by a top School Administrator I heard on the radio. I asked my friend who's husband teaches at a top Ontario highschool and she said "YES! he said the same thing".
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
620 posts
102 upvotes
Toronto
I cut off my teen cold turkey from the house Wifi. She was constantly on Instagram, snapchat, etc. hiding out up in her room.
Her cell phone has no data plan, just voice and texting and the computer in the family room.
Deal Addict
Feb 9, 2009
4486 posts
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Generally yes cause most people only put their best on social media (how many times do you read about someone's bad day... it happens but not too often).

So yeah you see someone on a vacation and you get jealous or a new car or a new kitchen or they have a hot new girlfriend, etc etc...
Newbie
Dec 22, 2016
19 posts
2 upvotes
It's probably not the easiest thing to cut off a young girl from her social media access. It also depends on how receptive she is. Rather than cutting her off, perhaps it might be better to help them find distractions and other outlets by introducing them to different hobbies or activities that would preoccupy them.
Newbie
Nov 20, 2016
26 posts
5 upvotes
Keep an eye on this thread. My wife has a lot of problems with our kids when they come home from school. Instead of cutting out their access altogether, you may want to consider restricting it to certain hours of the day. Especially at night, after they go to bed. We don't allow their phones in their bedrooms as well. If they have a data plan, that is a whole different problem. Likely best to take away their phones when they get home from school. Its really tough these days, with so much access to the internet. Its hard to deny your kids a phone when all the other kids have them.

best-option-restrict-kids-wifi-access-2140627/
Deal Guru
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Apr 16, 2002
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Family I know never imposed restrictions. Kids had every game system they wanted and played until 3AM on school nights .

Now one of them says he can't sleep and stopped attending school altogether. Age 17 means parents are really limited now in what they can do.

Nip that stuff in the bud early!
"Had one yesterday and there was a full slice of onion no thinner than a polio shoe.

I cried out in despair." RFD user Dingus
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
620 posts
102 upvotes
Toronto
Daisy91 wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 11:59 pm
It's probably not the easiest thing to cut off a young girl from her social media access. It also depends on how receptive she is. Rather than cutting her off, perhaps it might be better to help them find distractions and other outlets by introducing them to different hobbies or activities that would preoccupy them.
Problem is there is nothing you can do that will be more attractive than using Snapchat.
She really was/is still addicted to snapchat and instagram.
I initially had Wifi that was timed. She would mope around doing nothing useful or watch TV until the Wifi was back up.
Then it was like the flood gates are open and she back to doing her stuff on the internet, I would never see/hear from her until the Wifi was down again.
The anticipation of the next fix/session was just too much.

Only by cutting her off near completely could I hope to get her to do other things.
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2015
974 posts
364 upvotes
NubNub wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 1:20 pm
Problem is there is nothing you can do that will be more attractive than using Snapchat.
She really was/is still addicted to snapchat and instagram.
I initially had Wifi that was timed. She would mope around doing nothing useful or watch TV until the Wifi was back up.
Then it was like the flood gates are open and she back to doing her stuff on the internet, I would never see/hear from her until the Wifi was down again.
The anticipation of the next fix/session was just too much.

Only by cutting her off near completely could I hope to get her to do other things.
We have had to do this on a occasion. My kids aren’t on tech that much, but I do find there are times when they are on more than usually and their behaviour starts to change. It’s subtle, but I have been on the watch for it. At that point, everything gets cut off, from phones, computers, and tv. My oldest like it at the time, but after 2 or 3 days, she is fresh and back to normal in a good way. I know it’s a enough time, when they stop asking when they can have tech again.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 31, 2008
9555 posts
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Toronto
My parents in their 70s and many others I know who lived all their lives without access to the internet can't live today without it! What chance does a teen have?
Jr. Member
Oct 27, 2016
184 posts
33 upvotes
If you do it like you are limiting it, you are giving her restriction then she would not like it and most likely disobey it. So, please do limit her social media usage but do not sound like you are restricting her. Try to make her realize on her own if that's possible. Let her choose the right decision on her own. But don't risk her future by letting everytime go.

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