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Should U of C criminally convicted student be expelled?

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  • Jan 12th, 2018 8:45 pm
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Should U of C criminally convicted student be expelled?

21 year old man pleaded guilty to one count of sexual interference and was sentenced last week to 89 days in jail, for stuff he did with underage girl. If I understood the articles correctly, the offence(s) happened when the victim was 13 and he was 18.

Now, the convict is also a U of C student, second year in sciences. He's 21. The judge who convicted him delayed the start of his sentence so that he can finish his second year of school. Some "outraged" students have formed a petition to expel him out of university, with some thousands signing it.

He did the crime, and will soon do his time. Why stigmatize him, further? This is a perfect example of the perils of public/social justice trials. Not satisfied with the legal system, some want to take the law into their own hands. This is terrible, as they are undermining our judicial system.
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Aug 15, 2015
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It might be safer for him to finish school in prison. That is what distance learning is for. It sounds like he is not welcomed by his peers at school from your post. That way, he is not expelled and can finish his education.
Penalty Box
Aug 26, 2017
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People's lives were ruined for less than this. Remember the * her in the * guy? or the let me throw a beer can during a game? For SJW laws are not enough. SJW will enforce their own set of rules whether you like it or now.
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Jan 22, 2003
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Its a slippery slope, because soon anyone can get a petition that could target anyone. Blacks with criminal records could be targetted more prevalently than whites. Unless there's a rule in the University charter that they can discriminate based off criminal conduct, it'll be tough.
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Oct 6, 2015
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The offense had zero nexus to the University, and there is no stated requirement of being free of a criminal record to be eligible to attend the U of C, so I think the University would be on pretty shaky grounds to take any further action against the individual. His crime is being punished by the criminal judicial system.

The victim has remedies available through the civil courts, and judgements for criminal personal injury often survive bankruptcy.
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Micelli_Illuminatti wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 8:44 pm
21 year old man pleaded guilty to one count of sexual interference and was sentenced last week to 89 days in jail, for stuff he did with underage girl. If I understood the articles correctly, the offence(s) happened when the victim was 13 and he was 18.

Now, the convict is also a U of C student, second year in sciences. He's 21. The judge who convicted him delayed the start of his sentence so that he can finish his second year of school. Some "outraged" students have formed a petition to expel him out of university, with some thousands signing it.

He did the crime, and will soon do his time. Why stigmatize him, further? This is a perfect example of the perils of public/social justice trials. Not satisfied with the legal system, some want to take the law into their own hands. This is terrible, as they are undermining our judicial system.
Do you think the 13 years old girl he sexually interfered with will grow up and forget about it? Don't you think that will interfere her relationship with men in the future? Every day there is an article about someone who was mistreated when they were young and is not able to get past it. When the mother of that child says he did his time for his crime, then let it be.
A life spent making mistakes is not only more memorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.
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Micelli_Illuminatti wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 8:44 pm
He did the crime, and will soon do his time. Why stigmatize him, further? This is a perfect example of the perils of public/social justice trials. Not satisfied with the legal system, some want to take the law into their own hands. This is terrible, as they are undermining our judicial system.
Every university in Canada has a Code Of Conduct policy that students AGREED to abide by when they enrolled. They specifically lay out the definition of what non-academic "wrongdoings" are (including convictions under the Criminal Code) and the range of disciplinary action from reprimands to expulsion. These university rules have be around for DECADES and many students have been kicked out after a criminal conviction. This is nothing new.

Sorry to interrupt your rant about "social justice trials" with actual facts...
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akira1971 wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 10:16 am
Every university in Canada has a Code Of Conduct policy that students AGREED to abide by when they enrolled. They specifically lay out the definition of what non-academic "wrongdoings" are (including convictions under the Criminal Code) and the range of disciplinary action from reprimands to expulsion. These university rules have be around for DECADES and many students have been kicked out after a criminal conviction. This is nothing new.

Sorry to interrupt your rant about "social justice trials" with actual facts...
This
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at 18, i assumed he committed the wrong-doing before he enrolled in Univ?
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sandikosh wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 6:48 am
Do you think the 13 years old girl he sexually interfered with will grow up and forget about it? Don't you think that will interfere her relationship with men in the future? Every day there is an article about someone who was mistreated when they were young and is not able to get past it. When the mother of that child says he did his time for his crime, then let it be.
I had an older boyfriend when I was 13 and honestly, I'm not traumatized at all. I certainly went to school with lots of girls who liked/dated guys that were 18. Every situation is different. I also have an ex-boyfriend who was banging his boss's wife when he was 14 and she was probably 30. He certainly didn't seem troubled by it (he was in his 30s when I dated him).
[OP]
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sandikosh wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 6:48 am
Do you think the 13 years old girl he sexually interfered with will grow up and forget about it? Don't you think that will interfere her relationship with men in the future?

That's not the point. The point was that for what he did, he was punished by our criminal justice system. Although it is heartbreaking what happened to the 13 year old, no amount of punishment on the convict will ever change what happened to her; instead with the right amount of help from her family/community, she may be able to get over it, in time.

akira1971 wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 10:16 am
Every university in Canada has a Code Of Conduct policy that students AGREED to abide by when they enrolled. They specifically lay out the definition of what non-academic "wrongdoings" are (including convictions under the Criminal Code) and the range of disciplinary action from reprimands to expulsion. These university rules have be around for DECADES and many students have been kicked out after a criminal conviction. This is nothing new.

Sorry to interrupt your rant about "social justice trials" with actual facts...

In today's litigious society, a university nixing a student b/c of a criminal record is asking for a human rights fight on its hands. This may explain why U of C is not rushing to a decision to expel him. The goal of our penal system is not only to punish and deter people from committing other crimes, but to also reintegrate and redeem them. I would suggest there would be no issue if the offender was a woman. Indeed, if the convict is a member of visible minority, not only will she be allowed to a prestigious university, but also celebrated (despite a murder rap). Remember, some issues seem to be attracted only to white people, or more specifically, white men.

I'm calling this for what it is: a social justice trial. I'm sure neither you nor me would want our lives and careers destroyed for something stupid we did when we were teenagers.
Corvus oculum corvi non eruit.
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yesstyle wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 11:03 am
at 18, i assumed he committed the wrong-doing before he enrolled in Univ?
Why ?

Lots of kids finish HS in Ontario (Grade 12) at 17... some younger, some older
Think it’s the same in Alberta
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PointsHubby wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 11:42 am
Why ?

Lots of kids finish HS in Ontario (Grade 12) at 17... some younger, some older
Think it’s the same in Alberta
he's 21 and 2nd year...so 19 admitted to Univ? Does the the Univ Code of Conduct apply to him since it was committed before entering Univ?
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"one count of sexual interference"
^ what was it ?
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lubmar wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 11:56 am
"one count of sexual interference"
^ what was it ?
As I understood it, the short version is that victim used to send him inappropriate pics of herself. Then she stopped. He got mad. When they met, he held her in a choke-hold. The mother of the victim's friend, which victim's friend also used to send the convict pics of herself, found out and called police.

I was not involved in the prosecution of the case, but if it were me, charges for assault and child pornography would have also worked. The latter attracts mandatory minimum sentencing (I think at least 1.5 years), which may explain why that prosecutor withdrew the c.p. charge, following the plea bargaining. To say the offender dodged a bullet, in terms of incarceration length, is an understatement.
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