Automotive

Should you avoid "turbo" engines?

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  • Aug 16th, 2017 6:28 pm
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Oct 17, 2010
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Should you avoid "turbo" engines?

IT seems alot of car manufacturers are pushing turbos. downsizing engines to less then 2.0L and adding turbos to compensate for these underpowered 1.8L engines that supposely give u great mileage, but lack power, hence the turbo option.

Ive always been told, turbos in general, are an EXPENSIVE repair if they ever break.

For that reason alone, should they be avoided?

One of my vehicles im considering getting is the honda CRV but it only comes equiped with a 1.9L V4 TURBO.
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Aug 2, 2007
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thatsnazzyiphoneguy wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 12:33 am
….
One of my vehicles im considering getting is the honda CRV but it only comes equiped with a 1.9L V4 TURBO.
1.5L I4 Turbo.
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Dec 7, 2012
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thatsnazzyiphoneguy wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 12:33 am
For that reason alone, should they be avoided?

One of my vehicles im considering getting is the honda CRV but it only comes equiped with a 1.9L V4 TURBO.
fyi, the engine in the CR-V is a 'turbocharged 1.5-litre, DOHC direct-injected inline-4'
from http://www.hondanews.ca/en/news/release ... -Press-Kit

How long are you planning to keep this vehicle?
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Nov 3, 2012
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Any car can give you expensive repairs. Fixing a V6 Engine could be expensive, etc.

You can try to mitigate some of these expensive repairs by doing you're research (type of engine (How long it's been around) , pros/cons, avoiding first gen year cars (most newer ones have their problems ironed out), etc)
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Oct 24, 2005
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One of my cars is a 10 year old 2.0L turbo and i sometimes push it quite hard, no issues with the turbo.

Also used to own a 12 year old TDI which I believe was a 1.9L turbo and again no issues.

As long as you do oil changes and general maintenance it should be fine....if you plan on taking your Honda CRV to the track every day it may be a different story.
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Deal Guru
Aug 22, 2011
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Ottawa
The problem I have, are auto manufacturers switching to DI plus turbo.
There will be carbon build up on the back size of the intake valves, well before issues arises with the turbo.
Newbie
Mar 17, 2010
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Toronto
I have an 07 Saab 2.0T as a winter beater with 380,000 kms, bought it at 55,000kms...and zero turbo/engine related issues.
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May 10, 2005
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Turbo engines have been around a very long time. Be they turbo diesels in trucks and cars or high performance twin turbos in high end brands. Turbos in cars have been in Europe a lot longer than over here. No problems at all and very reliable.
Yes, they get more performance out of a smaller displacement engine plus less weight, all for better fuel economy. Direct injection engines, non turbo or turbo, had problems in the beginning but are no longer problematic.
My last 2 cars had turbos, a 2011 Optima 2.0 turbo, 290 hp using regular oil and now a CR-V, 1.5 turbo and have had no problems with either.
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Jr. Member
Apr 28, 2011
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Better fuel economy than a larger say v6 engine however most turbo cars require premium fuel and some full synthetic oil so there goes your fuel economy savings...
Mechanically I don't think they're any less reliable however it is one more thing to break/fix and can be an expensive one at that.
I had a Mercedes that needed a new turbo ($6000 from Mercedes dealer) and the car was only a couple years old.
Member
Oct 29, 2009
397 posts
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As a rule, no. But I think you want to do your research. There are turbo engines that are built to handle the additional heat/stress that a turbo brings. Those engines can be bulletproof. On the other hand if a company is putting a turbo on an engine that isn't built up enough to handle it then that will be a recipe for trouble obviously. It's hard to tell the good ones from the bad without some research so, as mentioned above, avoid buying a 1st generation turbo-equipped vehicle.
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Jan 20, 2005
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We have 2007 acurA Rdx (Honda) in the family, although it's a pig on gas it's been problem free. Has 180k on the clock now, always synthetic oil change with recommended rating
Deal Fanatic
Jan 15, 2004
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Love turbo engines. Turbo 4 are better than the V6 with low end torque. Well, it's a trend that will continue to happen as the demand for more efficient vehicles will continue to rise. No way to avoid it. Even those high power V8 are being replaced by V6 turbo. Good luck avoiding turbo all together.
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Jan 8, 2007
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Calgary
For most people NA is better, especially if you don't know much about cars or don't care to know about them (nothing wrong with that).

A turbo engine should be treated gently until the oil is warmed up and it should be driven gently a few min before you shut it off. This is where NA is better for most people.
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Jan 8, 2007
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tilfhunter wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 9:04 am
Better fuel economy than a larger say v6 engine however most turbo cars require premium fuel and some full synthetic oil so there goes your fuel economy savings...
Most main stream turbo cars require regular now, but the advertised power is based on either 91 or 93 octane. So it's your choice, the difference in power is usually 5-10%. Mazda is the only one so far to spell out how much power their turbo CX-9 has running either regular or premium.
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Aug 22, 2011
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aleks wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 9:35 am
For most people NA is better, especially if you don't know much about cars or don't care to know about them (nothing wrong with that).

A turbo engine should be treated gently until the oil is warmed up and it should be driven gently a few min before you shut it off. This is where NA is better for most people.
No longer applicable to modern engines; especially when shutting down as the turbo(s) are watercooled.

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