Automotive

Should you avoid "turbo" engines?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 16th, 2017 6:28 pm
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Deal Addict
Dec 5, 2015
1269 posts
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Thornhill, ON
Most definitely yes, but it's hard to to avoid with automakers needing better fuel economy while providing power

I've owned lots of turbos from the 2.0T in GTI to the S55 in the F80M4 and it's all not satisfying and a compromise

There is turbo lag, non linear power and it does drop off at top end and it's just not satisfying like driving a NA, but can't argue with the power and better fuel economy, but I buy them holding my nose.

Much prefer NA engines

Turbo engines also have more to go wrong and less tolerance for something to go wrong but I lease and dump so not a big issue for me

But reality is there's very few automakers who aren't on the turbo easy way out to fuel economy requirements.
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Nov 4, 2008
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GTA
mr_raider wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 1:36 pm
The T8 has an electric motor. Best of three worlds.
That's for sure :DThumbs Up Sign
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
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Edmonton
MP3_SKY wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 10:56 am
As per uber_shnitz mentioned, don't ever say V4.
When someone say V4, means that person has very limited knowledge about cars....

Inline 4 is what we call. there is V6, V8, but not V4. There are inline6 for 6 cylinders N/A cars, not only V6.

A lot of manufactures are still making and selling non Turbo cars. Corolla are 4 cyclinders. a lot of compact cars are still running with 4 cyc engines.
I have a feeling you have very limited knowledge about cars....
There is V6, there is V8, and there is definitely V4 aswell:
First off - motorcycles, lots of em have it.

Saab and triumph had V4 in the 60's and 70's

Ford made a bunch of them aswell:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Taunus_V4_engine

And also Porshe 919 Hybrid apparently... but not sure about that one
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
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Jul 12, 2003
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tmkf_patryk wrote:
Aug 13th, 2017 2:13 pm
I have a feeling you have very limited knowledge about cars....
There is V6, there is V8, and there is definitely V4 aswell:
First off - motorcycles, lots of em have it.

Saab and triumph had V4 in the 60's and 70's

Ford made a bunch of them aswell:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Taunus_V4_engine

And also Porshe 919 Hybrid apparently... but not sure about that one
Good job on your research (after my post 2 days ago). Google n wiki is always your best teacher.

Now you have your reference, keep saying V4 then. Lol
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Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
1939 posts
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MP3_SKY wrote:
Aug 13th, 2017 3:44 pm
Good job on your research (after my post 2 days ago). Google n wiki is always your best teacher.

Now you have your reference, keep saying V4 then. Lol
Its funny, I replied to your post after working on one yesterday evening :) Good ol triumph
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Fanatic
Dec 27, 2013
5824 posts
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Toronto
BMW makes inline 6s, thats their thing.
Sr. Member
Jan 27, 2015
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Edmonton, AB
Pete_Coach wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:37 pm
The statement was "toyota's new NA engines= more powerful and better fuel economy compared to competition turbos"
No logic required. If you are going to compare, do it apples to apples.
Ahh... therein lies the rub.

Competing turbos would be the new Accord's turbo (base). Whereas your argument was somehow comparing Toyota's base engine to a higher-end engine just to prove a point. Perhaps you're being biased but you don't see it.

Either way, I don't think that Turbos are all that bad. They provide great fuel economy IF you're not in the boost all the time. They can last a long time meaning they're not less reliable.

But the main point is that the reason why we're seeing the death of V6s and more Turbo engines is due to higher fuel economy standards.
Newbie
May 22, 2013
75 posts
20 upvotes
Vancouver
the short answer is yes, these engines won't last as long
Newbie
May 22, 2013
75 posts
20 upvotes
Vancouver
the short answer is yes, these engines won't last as long
Deal Fanatic
Dec 27, 2013
5824 posts
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Toronto
lies bro. Turbos last forever. its like any engine. it's moving parts, bearings, oil, etc. sometimes it lasts. sometimes u unlucky and it breaks.

it's like saying people dont last long. some last too long. some die to younge. shit happens.
Deal Guru
Jun 11, 2005
12273 posts
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Toronto
daivey wrote:
Aug 13th, 2017 11:41 pm
lies bro. Turbos last forever. its like any engine. it's moving parts, bearings, oil, etc. sometimes it lasts. sometimes u unlucky and it breaks.

it's like saying people dont last long. some last too long. some die to younge. shit happens.
True
Newbie
Jun 10, 2017
5 posts
3 upvotes
Most of the time, turbo lag people think they feel, is the fact they aren't in the right gear. Stamping on the accelerator when in 6ft gear (in auto cars) would mean your transmission would have to drop down a few gears to find a gear that matches how hard you are stepping on it.

Turbo cars these days require almost no additional maintenance than NA cars. If you are afraid to own a modern day turbo car because of the maintenance then you probably shouldn't own a car at all (be it turbo, supercharged or NA).

Most turbo cars these days have stronger internals. This is because they are little engines pushing very high amount of boost.
Sr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
650 posts
296 upvotes
Pete_Coach wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:37 pm
The statement was "toyota's new NA engines= more powerful and better fuel economy compared to competition turbos"
No logic required. If you are going to compare, do it apples to apples.
I think your missing what the turbo 4's on a lot of those cars are meant to compete with. Honda is replacing a V6 with a turbo 4, it's doing that to avoid using a V6. So yes comparing Honda's Turbo 4 in the Accord to Toyota's V6 in the Camry makes sense as they are in the same segment. The displacement is smaller (hence lower weight and thus fuel efficiency) but they are meant to pump out similar torque as a V6. After all a 40K (using 2017 est) Accord Touring Turbo engine is not meant to compete with a 24k I4 Camry.
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BonnieDrasco wrote:
Aug 14th, 2017 9:45 am
Most of the time, turbo lag people think they feel, is the fact they aren't in the right gear. Stamping on the accelerator when in 6ft gear (in auto cars) would mean your transmission would have to drop down a few gears to find a gear that matches how hard you are stepping on it.

Turbo cars these days require almost no additional maintenance than NA cars. If you are afraid to own a modern day turbo car because of the maintenance then you probably shouldn't own a car at all (be it turbo, supercharged or NA).

Most turbo cars these days have stronger internals. This is because they are little engines pushing very high amount of boost.
Very much this. Automatics are the blame for most of the throttle response lag that people feel. Your auto trans is gently moving along in 7th-9th gear, you push the throttle to accelerate, not much happens, so you push harder, auto trans starts to kick down gears as you keep pushing harder until finally it gets down to 3rd gear, engine now has enough RPM to make boost, car launches ahead way more than you intended.
That's my experience with driving my wife's Q5, and other automatics. I can mitigate this issue by manually shifting down to 3rd/4th, but it's hard to tell what gear you're in without a manual shifter or staring down at the gauge cluster, plus the manual shift feature on the gear lever is backwards from how it should be. It should be push forward to shift down but forward is stupidly to shift up.

Agreed on turbo maintenance. They're so under-stressed and well cooled these days. I'd be more afraid of direct injection due to carbon build up and common failure with high pressure fuel pumps.
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Jan 7, 2007
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engineered wrote:
Aug 14th, 2017 11:52 am
Very much this. Automatics are the blame for most of the throttle response lag that people feel. Your auto trans is gently moving along in 7th-9th gear, you push the throttle to accelerate, not much happens, so you push harder, auto trans starts to kick down gears as you keep pushing harder until finally it gets down to 3rd gear, engine now has enough RPM to make boost, car launches ahead way more than you intended.
That's my experience with driving my wife's Q5, and other automatics. I can mitigate this issue by manually shifting down to 3rd/4th, but it's hard to tell what gear you're in without a manual shifter or staring down at the gauge cluster, plus the manual shift feature on the gear lever is backwards from how it should be. It should be push forward to shift down but forward is stupidly to shift up.

Agreed on turbo maintenance. They're so under-stressed and well cooled these days. I'd be more afraid of direct injection due to carbon build up and common failure with high pressure fuel pumps.
You do know that today turbos are direct injection. Now you got two things to worry about.
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