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Soliciting Opinions on Buying a Damaged Musical Instrument

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  • Nov 3rd, 2015 11:35 pm
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Oct 13, 2007
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Edmonton

Soliciting Opinions on Buying a Damaged Musical Instrument

So here is the scenario. There is a family member interested in buying a musical instrument, it is a brass instrument. Let's say that the discount is about $500 on a $2,000 instrument. The damage is cosmetic but visibly dented, primarily on the underside so not in clear view when playing it.

Would you buy the instrument to save $500?
7 replies
Member
Oct 17, 2015
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Mississauga
I'm a trombone player and my trombone is visually ugly. But it plays like a charm. Instruments are for the sound not how they look. Bbuy it
Sr. Member
Apr 14, 2015
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Tsuu T'Ina, AB
Depends where the dent is and how big it is. It could affect the sound. Usually they can be repaired though, maybe see if you can take it into a shop before you buy.

What is the instrument?
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Jan 3, 2014
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starchoice wrote: So here is the scenario. There is a family member interested in buying a musical instrument, it is a brass instrument. Let's say that the discount is about $500 on a $2,000 instrument. The damage is cosmetic but visibly dented, primarily on the underside so not in clear view when playing it.

Would you buy the instrument to save $500?
If the damage is cosmetic however and has no impact at all on the output or playability of the instrument, then I don't see why you wouldn't take advantage of such a savings.
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Dec 4, 2010
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SartajA735 wrote: I'm a trombone player and my trombone is visually ugly. But it plays like a charm. Instruments are for the sound not how they look. Bbuy it
DOesn't augmentation in the body alter the sound it produces? I know some older generation sax players like David Sunburn has some really old equipment but I'm sure he gets it important bits and pieces refurbished every so often.
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Aug 15, 2003
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It depends on the details, I reckon. If said family member is just learning to play, I'd say go for it, and then if the instrument is still being played a few years from now, maybe trade up to a nicer one. (The instruments we had back in high school sure endured plenty of punishment.)

If the family member has been playing for years and this is going to be regularly used in glamorous shows for a paying audience, then splurging might be a better idea.
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Aug 18, 2005
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An older brass instrument can often be greatly superior to a brand new model.

I still remember how my high school music teacher quietly sold off one of the school's ancient, abused, beat up Boosey & Hawkes trombones to a professional musician for cash. That musician would have paid thousands to get the instrument re-brassed / re-finished. It was a good deal on both ends. Of course, the teacher recycled that cash and was able to get a brand new instrument for the classroom.
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Feb 27, 2014
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Yes, for $500 "cosmetic but visibly dented, primarily on the underside so not in clear view" should be ok

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