Cell Phones

SpeakOut mobile browsing NOT unlimited, not even close -'Fair usage' = 2Gb MAX

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 26th, 2014 12:54 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 16, 2011
138 posts
20 upvotes
ceraf wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 3:57 pm
1) You're right, I wasn't the one who said 2 GB is way more than enough.

2) I used to use about 2 GB per month. I do share some of your sentiments that I wasn't forewarned that there was a 2 GB limit, but it doesn't affect me as much anymore now that I'm consistently using 1 GB.

3) If you read my post in context, I was replying to kitty's post regarding monitoring usage. I was only aware of tracking availability on iOS and Android. I'm sorry if you (or any other user) took it the wrong way; I was merely trying to help users track their usage who currently use the service since the 2 GB "limit" has seemingly been imposed on us.

For me personally, I tracked my own usage in preparation that this $10 UMB service would no longer be offered in the near future, so that I would be able to gauge how big of a data plan I would actually need if/when I switch over to one of the Big 3 (or one of its subsidiaries).
All good points, ceraf. However, I don't share your view that customers should simply come to expect, and accept, being lied to or gouged. I'll repeat what I wrote in a previous post:

Only corporate trolls wanting to maintain or reduce already low caps to increase profit margins would spend so much time trying to convince customers that 10Gb usage on a plan that is advertised as 'unlimited' is abuse. Whether it's 2, 10 or 20 Gb, you can rest assured that they're making a healthy profit on it, since it likely costs them a few cents per Gb. (Assuming wireless data even costs 10X the cost of wired, you're looking at $0.30/Gb)

If a company is not being honest or reducing its product / service offering simply to jack already high profits, then customers should shop for another provider. If they're all colluding to do the same thing, either lowering service level at the same price point or increasing prices on existing services, customers should let their feet do the talking:

Ted Sarandos, the (Netflix) company’s chief content officer, recently said at a conference that Canadians “have almost third-world access to the internet” because of high prices, a relative lack of competition, and bandwidth caps.

Canadian customers shouldn't be paying premium prices for 'third-world' services. The mobile operators get away with it by fomenting smartphone hysteria, telling kids and yound adults that they NEED to always be connected. To do what, constantly update twitter/facebook and play flinging birds with friends? As the economy continues to tank, hopefully more and more people will catch on that they're being gouged for a non-essential service. It's already happening with cable/satellite services, with more and more Canadians switching to FTA, OTA and the internet to watch shows and movies. Funny thing is that those same cable/satellite providers also control the major mobile networks; they'll increasingly look to gouge mobile customers to make up for falling revenues for their TV services. Count on data caps continuing to fall and prices continuing to rise if customers don't start criticising thier business practices and walking away in increasing numbers.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 16, 2011
138 posts
20 upvotes
l69norm wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 4:28 pm
OP, why are you whining at us?
None of us have the power to change this, even if we wanted to.
Complain here instead:
http://news.sympatico.cbc.ca/home/consu ... s/86e2a1f6
Thanks for the link. This forum is called 'Cell Phones' and the discussion seems to centre on good deals, bad deals and info. There seems to be a lot of hype re SpeakOut's 'Unlimited internet for only $10!', so figured a little balance wouldn't hurt. Several people have since posted telling of their similar experiences (getting disconnected AFTER first learning they'd exceeded an unadvertised 2Gb cap), so it appears to have served its intended purpose: To give customers a heads up that the data service is neither unlimited nor anything close to it.
Newbie
Mar 8, 2007
60 posts
3 upvotes
Vancouver
Kind of late to the discussion and not knowing all the details, I think it would be fair to say any customers deserve at least one warning prior to termination. Also, is there any way to monitor the data usage online (I presume not since billing detail is not available also)? 2GB a month is about 66MB a day which is not that high really even for general browsing. Without any meaningful way to monitor your own usage, one might go over it unintentionally easily.
Deal Addict
Nov 25, 2007
2482 posts
460 upvotes
Toronto
I am really considering trying out Wind, the battery life is a killer on Speakout phones with proxy apps, and crappy minutes. I really wish they had the unlimited minutes after 7 or so.

Then again, I could pay $40 a month and get 300 minutes + 2GB data, and unl text.

I'm only afraid of Wind reception.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 15, 2004
4121 posts
348 upvotes
Thornhill / North Yo…
htrab1 wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 4:52 pm
All good points, ceraf. However, I don't share your view that customers should simply come to expect, and accept, being lied to or gouged.
To a certain degree, you're right...customers shouldn't just get stepped on when they're given seemingly unfair treatment. But if you take a step back for a moment, there are just some things that aren't going to change significantly anytime soon.


The "All You Can Eat" buffet example comes to mind. Suppose a buffet restaurant advertises an "All You Can Eat" buffet for $5 on their front door. A customer, who deduces from the sign that he can eat as much as he is physically capable of eating for $5, walks into a restaurant. He is greeted by a waiter, is seated, given a menu, and has is order taken. His food arrives, and he eats. The food turns out to amazing, and the customer is happy at this point.

He ends up ordering a lot more than he can finish, so by the end of the meal, the waiter gives him a bill of $25. Surprised by the expensive bill, he asks the waiter why the meal doesn't cost only $5. The waiter pulls out the menu and points to some fine print on the back stating that every unfinished dish costs $5 extra. The customer at this point somewhat shocked that he was not forewarned about the extra charge for unfinished food.

The customer then decides to get some tupperware containers from his car so that he can pack the unfinished food and take it home. The waiter stops him saying that he is not allowed to take it home, since "All You Can Eat" suggests that the food is eaten only in the restaurant. In response, the customer says that the menu doesn't explicitly say that you cannot take unfinished food home, and he is physically capable of eating all the food if he eats it next day. The waiter calls out the restaurant manager, who tells the customer that he must pay the full $25 for his meal.



I'm sure this is just an extreme example, but you get the idea. As much as the business is at fault for "false advertisement" and should at least tell the customer outright about any important fine-print, is it really worth fighting for given that it's relatively good deal already?
Member
User avatar
Aug 13, 2012
451 posts
132 upvotes
Is this thread still going on???
htrab1 wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 4:52 pm
Only corporate trolls wanting to maintain or reduce already low caps to increase profit margins would spend so much time trying to convince customers that 10Gb usage on a plan that is advertised as 'unlimited' is abuse.
You keep on to COMPLETELY missing the point, you are probably too busy patting yourself on the back and repeating yourself ad nauseum. There are no "corporate trolls" in this thread, whatever they even may be. Trust me, the Mr Rogers' of this world are really not going to answer a hokey thread like this anyway, they are too busy counting their loonies.
Anyone who thinks that even ONE person who responded in this thread wants to maintain the current ridiculous data caps, is absolutely insane. Of course nobody wants that.

The only thing that some people (whom you insist on insulting) continue to point out, that anyway who uses well over 10GB out of $10 and expects to get away with it based on one little advertising term, is hardly being reasonable.

In other words, you are STILL fighting windmills, Don Quixote. Why don't you find a better cause to complain about, such as the far more ridiculous cap of 100MB for $10 (which ALL the other carriers rip us off with). You may also find a better place to complain, such as the link l69norm provided. I truly don't think you realize how ridiculous you appear in this here thread... but then again you seem to enjoy it.

Sorry, I said I wouldn't reply any more, but couldn't resist this one ;)
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 16, 2011
138 posts
20 upvotes
wlachan wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 6:06 pm
Kind of late to the discussion and not knowing all the details, I think it would be fair to say any customers deserve at least one warning prior to termination. Also, is there any way to monitor the data usage online (I presume not since billing detail is not available also)? 2GB a month is about 66MB a day which is not that high really even for general browsing. Without any meaningful way to monitor your own usage, one might go over it unintentionally easily.
Yep. 2Gb cap is nowhere near 'unlimited' with a modern phone browser, and it's not advertised. From the feedback on the thread, it looks like customers are learning about the cap for the first time AFTER they've received those two nasty text messages. I'd written earlier that at the very least they should give customers a heads up before disconnecting them by telling them they've reached 75%, 90%, or whatever of their usage cap. Then at least customers who were unaware of the very limited 2Gb cap would have a chance to learn about it. Not advertising it then first notifying customers of it at the time of cancellation is just sleazy.
Newbie
Nov 5, 2012
81 posts
11 upvotes
SCARBOROUGH
I recently signed up with SpeakOut just to get the UNLIMITED mobile browsing again. If I knew ahead of time, that it was a 2GB limit, and then they might be able stop my account and forfeit what I have already invested, I don't think I would have signed up for speakout, or at the bare minimum, I would have gotten a $25 top up instead of the $100 top up that I purchased.

Everyone seems to like to throw out some scenarios of why the OP is wrong and how SpeakOut is in the right. Here's my scenario: Netflix, they advertise that they offer UNLIMITED viewing of their shows and movies. Would it be right for them to say that you are only able to watch 2 hours of programming a day (which is roughly what the "average canadian watches"-but any number will suffice), to a maximum of 60 hours a month. If you go over the 60 hours a month, then we will cancel your services immediately because that is above what they expect you to view, even though it is advertised as unlimited. Is that right?

I think this is crappy for SpeakOut to do, and if anything, they should grandfather those who have the plan now, and not let this "limit" effect them, and for new subscribers to the "UMB" sign up for something called 2GB of Data.
Newbie
Mar 8, 2007
60 posts
3 upvotes
Vancouver
It is not right to advertise whatever limited amount as UNLIMITED, but the big question is WHY ARE THEY ALLOWED TO DO SO LEGALLY? Then again, there are countless shady business practices that the politicians feel perfectly okay (and most people know why).
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 1, 2012
1150 posts
136 upvotes
Gatineau
JAC wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 1:42 pm
It should mean any function supported by the web browser on your phone. Theoretically, you could stream youtube video 24/7 and be well within your rights.
you cannot stream videos from youtube! they blocked it unless you are using proxydroid or droidvpn
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 12, 2010
611 posts
55 upvotes
I find it ironic that a lot of the greedy peasants complaining against speakout also have auto-proxies running, avoiding the blocked ports. There was always an industry distinction between mobile browsing and data.

I guess its ok for you guys to break the rules heh.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
11105 posts
678 upvotes
Toronto
wlachan wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 6:06 pm
Kind of late to the discussion and not knowing all the details, I think it would be fair to say any customers deserve at least one warning prior to termination. Also, is there any way to monitor the data usage online (I presume not since billing detail is not available also)? 2GB a month is about 66MB a day which is not that high really even for general browsing. Without any meaningful way to monitor your own usage, one might go over it unintentionally easily.
You could install a data counter which is what I did to monitor my usage.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 16, 2011
138 posts
20 upvotes
wlachan wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 8:45 pm
It is not right to advertise whatever limited amount as UNLIMITED, but the big question is WHY ARE THEY ALLOWED TO DO SO LEGALLY? Then again, there are countless shady business practices that the politicians feel perfectly okay (and most people know why).
Best question so far, walchan. They're allowed to do so because in Canada we have a government and bureaucracy that genuinely doesn't care about the public good or interest.

If you file a complaint with CCTS, the company will reply either stating that they indicated that certain conditions apply in their ToS or that their terms are "subject to change without notice". CCTS will then simply wash their hands of it and tell you that they don't regulate advertising, that their mandate is restricted to ensuring companies meet their obligations per their ToS. You could then go on to file a complaint with the Competitiion Bureau, but they will likewise interpret their mandate as narrowly as possible, stating that the advertising does not meet their standard for 'false or misleading' without any further explanation, so as to avoid doing their job.

Every ToS nowadays has a "subject to change without notice" clause, as well as numerous other odious terms and restrictions that customers would likely not accept if they knew about them up front. That sort of thing should be illegal, but it isn't. Basically, they get away with whatever they want to do because we have no legitimate oversight in Canada.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 16, 2011
138 posts
20 upvotes
kwanyeung20 wrote:
Dec 7th, 2012 8:49 pm
you cannot stream videos from youtube! they blocked it unless you are using proxydroid or droidvpn
That's just simply false. The stock Android browser played youtube vidoes without any tweaks. The Opera browser only required that the user enter the proxy information found in the APN settings into the browser's proxy settings (Opera does not automatically detect it).

Blatantly lying to deflect attention from SpeakOut's false and misleading advertising. Sad. Next they'll tell you that their interpretation of the ToS does not allow you to use any phone other than one bought from SpeakOut - despite the fact SpeakOut markets the service as BYOD and appears to have gotten out of the business of selling phones all together.
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