Parenting & Family

Speech Therapy Experiences & Cost?

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[OP]
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Jan 16, 2008
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casey5 wrote:
May 25th, 2010 10:34 pm
I paid $150.00 for a 1 hour session - no report writing.

Found the above who told me she wouldn't do a report but rather videotape the whole session as she found that it helped parents more than just a written report.

The videotape did help as she went through the practice tips during the session and I could play it back as often as I wanted to.

Right after that session, we got a call from Erinoak to schedule my son's first appointment (about 2 months after the scheduling). He had about 4-5 sessions at Erinoak and was discharged at the pre-school level.
video tape is definitely easier since you can play it back whenever you want. but without a report, wonder how Erinoak would have "read" the report for reassessment if you had more sessions with her before getting into Erinoak
Deal Addict
Aug 12, 2005
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Mississauga
Does your speech pathologist have the session with your son/daughter on a one on one basis alone?

Mine is suggesting that I should drop off and pick up my 3 year old at her home office. But I'm not quite comfortable with the idea.
[OP]
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Jan 16, 2008
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ayeung wrote:
May 26th, 2010 12:09 am
Does your speech pathologist have the session with your son/daughter on a one on one basis alone?

Mine is suggesting that I should drop off and pick up my 3 year old at her home office. But I'm not quite comfortable with the idea.
haven't started it yet, but would not be leaving my 3 yo by themselves....stick with your gut and say that you'll be staying. they may suggest that your son/daughter won't be able to concentrate...at which point i would just find another practioner...and most likely one with an actual office, etc rather than home. not saying you don't run the same risk, but still...
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Sep 10, 2009
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GT&A
Can a second language spoken at home confuse the child to the point of having problems learning and repeating sounds, etc?
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Jan 2, 2007
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Toronto
longitude wrote:
May 26th, 2010 7:32 am
Can a second language spoken at home confuse the child to the point of having problems learning and repeating sounds, etc?
My son had speech delay due to repeated ear infections. the first thing we were asked to do was to switch to English only with him and between us in front of him. It was to make sure that there's minimal confusion while learning the intricacies of a language.
But I guess it would vary with the exact need of the child.
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Jan 2, 2007
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Toronto
sienna owner wrote:
May 26th, 2010 6:48 am
haven't started it yet, but would not be leaving my 3 yo by themselves....stick with your gut and say that you'll be staying. they may suggest that your son/daughter won't be able to concentrate...at which point i would just find another practioner...and most likely one with an actual office, etc rather than home. not saying you don't run the same risk, but still...
Our therapist insists that one of the parents be present at all times during the session. The primary reason is that therapy is like school for you too - you have to work with the kid afterward (there's homework!). By knowing how the therapist approaches a particular topic, you can use the same technique and not confuse the child.

It helped us identify our son's weaknesses and focus on them in a more consistent manner. She keeps giving hints and suggestions as we go that we utilize later.
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Aug 22, 2003
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Niagara Falls
Just a heads up...

I would be insisting on a written report and paying for it if need be. If the child continues to have issues and requires interventions once in school the written report can speed things along. For example, if the child is still needing therapy when enrolled in JK that report can be used at enrollment (in Feb) to put things in place for Sept. That includes an IPRC and IEP, saving valuable time in the big picture resulting in proper placement if needed.
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Sep 14, 2006
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My girlfriend is a SLP and I think she mentioned that the minimum that they charge is about 120 an hour. It's set by their governing body. If you want an exact amount and the details for speech therapy, I can find out more. Just send me a pm and I'll ask her.
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Member
Jan 20, 2009
491 posts
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Ontario
sienna owner wrote:
May 25th, 2010 11:26 pm
video tape is definitely easier since you can play it back whenever you want. but without a report, wonder how Erinoak would have "read" the report for reassessment if you had more sessions with her before getting into Erinoak
Thanks for the critique.
Member
Dec 27, 2009
277 posts
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The idea of a video tape sounds very appealing. As a parent who watched her son get the speech therapy a video tape of the session would certainly be helpful for inhome practicing.
However, in the end a written report about all the sessions would be beneficial
when your child is starting school a written report of the types of therapies used for your child would certainly benefit them in the long run, so the new SLP taking over your childs case knows what has been done and doesn't have to start from scratch.
Where my son is currently receiving speech, they have a room like in police stations... the kids are in a fun filled room with the SLP and OT and the parents are on the other side looking through a tinted window. It's nice as I find my son gets distracted when one of us is in there with him and this way we are able to see what is learning.
Newbie
Apr 18, 2009
78 posts
6 upvotes
Fenwick
My advice is to pay for an assessment and in the meantime get your child on the list at KidsAbility (it's free). My KidsAbility speech therapist told me thier waiting list is now 6 months for an assessment and then another 7 months to have them seen. So it's worth the assessment $.
[OP]
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Jan 16, 2008
7696 posts
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Medve wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2010 10:02 pm
My advice is to pay for an assessment and in the meantime get your child on the list at KidsAbility (it's free). My KidsAbility speech therapist told me thier waiting list is now 6 months for an assessment and then another 7 months to have them seen. So it's worth the assessment $.
yes...in york it's 9-10months to book an assesment...they didn't mention about therapy...but have set up assessment with private SLP anyways
Newbie
May 27, 2010
6 posts
Markham
The Speech and Stuttering institute may be another worthwhile resource. Our SLP for our son was $160 - 1hr assessment and $130 per 1hr session. First round is between 12 and 14 sessions. York region waiting list is 10 months for pre-school and we were advised most kids. "Age" out before an assessment and definitely before group treatment. Kicker is no less than six people we spoke with regarding the wait-list and telling us how they wish it wasn't that bad. Great to see our taxes funding the bureaucracy and not preventative care for children.
Newbie
Jan 8, 2008
2 posts
I'm looking for a speech therapist for my 3 yr old son. Does anyone know of a good speech therapist in the mississauga/oakville area?
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4005 posts
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Ottawa
sienna owner wrote:
May 21st, 2010 8:51 am
...
we know it's not autism or hearing, cause he gives a devilish grin when we say no to certain things, crosses his arms and stomps off...and we know he's trying to say things, which are getting better.
...
Are you sure it isn't autism, when our son was around 18-24 months, we were very concerned about speech delay but ruled out autism mostly cause he didn't exhibit a lot of the 'classic' signs of it (at least to us, we thought autistic implied he wouldn't want contact, would flap his arms and rock when sitting, would often be very angry / aggressive, etc which are only some of the behavior of autism but not present in all) and we had been told by a pediatrician and a child psychologist that he wasn't autistic. Well, it turns out that after waiting for the 'First Words' program and seeing various specialist, he was diagnosed with autism. Had we known more about it, we probably would have recognized it even when he was 1 year old or less. If you have any concerns at all, speak to doctor (and make sure they are familiar with it - as mentioned we had 2 'experts' say that he wasn't)). In our case, our son displayed several signs, we just didn't know what they were of: repetitive play (he loved to spin objects and watch the spin and could do that for hours - we thought he was just real easy going), lack of pretend/imaginative play (we had noticed this but didn't think it was anything important), lack of social play (even as he got older, he would very rarely play 'with' friends and would only play 'along' them, didn't seem to care at all what others were doing - again we thought he was just content and didn't pay much attention to it), speech delay - that's really the one thing we were concerned about and what made us seek help. We actually started with speech therapy and spent a lot of money on it with very little improvement (we're actually kind of bummed about the speech therapy, not so much because we spent the money on it but because the therapist kind of said latter on, when we finally got an actual diagnosis, that she had long suspected that he was on the autism spectrum but because she is a speech therapist and not a doctor, she's not allowed to make a diagnosis or to even tell us what she suspects).

In a perfect world, whether or not you get the actual 'autism' diagnosis would really be irrelevant and long as he's improving however unfortunately, in many areas, there are huge waiting lists for services paid by the province. We waited 9 months until we got the diagnosis (from the time that we brought them to the 'First Words' sessions and told them that we felt he wasn't progressing as well as he should) and then once we had the diagnosis, waited 2 years until he entered a provincially funded autism program - during that time we probably spent about $40k on private therapy because, although they have huge lists, they all say that the earlier you can start therapy the better the results and obviously we want to give our son all the opportunities we can.

If you have any doubts at all, speak to your doctor or at least try to get a lot more information on autism (as mentioned, if we had known more, we probably would have identified it before he was one, instead he was diagnosed at 2 1/2). There are tons of resources on the net - one that I believe is very good is www.autismspeaks.org (I think). If I have the correct one, they have a series of videos that compare the behavior of typical child with an autistic child. When I saw those, I was kicking myself because it would have been so obvious had we known more about it; watching the autistic videos, I was thinking 'my son could have made this movies; this is exactly like him ...'

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