• Last Updated:
  • Dec 28th, 2017 1:18 am
Tags:
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 17, 2017
1 posts

Sprained Ankle

I have sprained my ankle very badly, this happened October 13th. I was on crutches for a week, then a walking boot for 4 weeks, then limping for 2 weeks. About 2 weeks ago I started running and swimming and doing sports again (I'm very active), but on Friday I had fitness class where we did rock wall climbing, and then swim practice which doesn't really affect my ankle because I'm kicking from my hips. It is again very swollen and discolored. I have had x-rays before and the doctor said it was a very bad sprain. But should the pain be back? I wasn't doing anything different just my normal routine.
4 replies
Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2008
902 posts
307 upvotes
After a "very bad sprain", you need to rehab your ankle, not just return to normal activities.

Seeing a physio therapist would be the best course of action. At the very least, read up on how to rehab from a sprained ankle,
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport ... bilitation

Once you have given it enough rest, and done some basic strengthening exercises, a wobble board is a very good tool to strength,. as well as to improve "proprioception",
Deal Addict
Nov 3, 2003
1921 posts
250 upvotes
Toronto
multimut wrote:
Dec 18th, 2017 4:17 pm
After a "very bad sprain", you need to rehab your ankle, not just return to normal activities.
Totally agree. I sprained my ankle in May and all the doctors I saw felt no need for physio. I could walk and drive with no problems, but I knew I wasn't properly healed. I couldn't sit cross legged, stand on my tippy toes or stand on one foot. With my physio, I worked on strength, balance and proprioception, and now can do almost everything I could do before.

OP, keep in mind that if you don't properly rehab your ankle, you are at high risk of re-spraining it and also causing strain on your other soft tissues because they will be constantly compensating for your weak ankle.
Penalty Box
User avatar
Aug 20, 2012
10289 posts
947 upvotes
Pacific Ocean
brookewalker813 wrote:
Dec 18th, 2017 2:00 pm
I have sprained my ankle very badly, this happened October 13th. I was on crutches for a week, then a walking boot for 4 weeks, then limping for 2 weeks. About 2 weeks ago I started running and swimming and doing sports again (I'm very active), but on Friday I had fitness class where we did rock wall climbing, and then swim practice which doesn't really affect my ankle because I'm kicking from my hips. It is again very swollen and discolored. I have had x-rays before and the doctor said it was a very bad sprain. But should the pain be back? I wasn't doing anything different just my normal routine.

You may have a more serious injury called a talar dome lesion. https://www.foothealthfacts.org/conditi ... ome-lesion

Talar Dome Lesion
What Is a Talar Dome Lesion?


The ankle joint is composed of the bottom of the tibia (shin) bone and the top of the talus (ankle) bone. The top of the talus is dome-shaped and is completely covered with cartilage—a tough, rubbery tissue that enables the ankle to move smoothly. A talar dome lesion is an injury to the cartilage and underlying bone of the talus within the ankle joint. It is also called an osteochondral defect (OCD) or osteochondral lesion of the talus (OLT). “Osteo” means bone and “chondral” refers to cartilage.

Talar dome lesions are usually caused by an injury, such as an ankle sprain. If the cartilage does not heal properly following the injury, it softens and begins to break off. Sometimes a broken piece of the damaged cartilage and bone will float in the ankle.

Signs & Symptoms
Unless the injury is extensive, it may take months, a year or even longer for symptoms to develop. The signs and symptoms of a talar dome lesion may include:

Chronic pain deep in the ankle—typically worse when bearing weight on the foot (especially during sports) and less when resting
An occasional clicking or catching feeling in the ankle when walking
A sensation of the ankle locking or giving out
Episodes of swelling of the ankle—occurring when bearing weight and subsiding when at rest

Diagnosis
A talar dome lesion can be difficult to diagnose because the precise site of the pain can be hard to pinpoint. To diagnose this injury, the foot and ankle surgeon will question the patient about recent or previous injury and will examine the foot and ankle, moving the ankle joint to help determine if there is pain, clicking or limited motion within that joint.

Sometimes the surgeon will inject the joint with an anesthetic (pain-relieving medication) to see if the pain goes away for a while, indicating that the pain is coming from inside the joint. X-rays are taken, and often an MRI or other advanced imaging tests are ordered to further evaluate the lesion and extent of the injury.

Nonsurgical Treatment Approaches
Treatment depends on the severity of the talar dome lesion. If the lesion is stable (without loose pieces of cartilage or bone), one or more of the following nonsurgical treatment options may be considered:

Immobilization. Depending on the type of injury, the leg may be placed in a cast or cast boot to protect the talus. During this period of immobilization, nonweightbearing range-of-motion exercises may be recommended.
Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation.
Physical therapy. Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and swelling.
Ankle brace. Wearing an ankle brace may help protect the patient from reinjury if the ankle is unstable.

When Is Surgery Needed?
If nonsurgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of talar dome lesions, surgery may be necessary. Surgery may involve removal of the loose bone and cartilage fragments within the joint and establishing an environment for healing. A variety of surgical techniques is available to accomplish this. The surgeon will select the best procedure based on the specific case.

Complications of Talar Dome Lesions
Depending on the amount of damage to the cartilage in the ankle joint, arthritis may develop in the joint, resulting in chronic pain, swelling and limited joint motion. Treatment for these complications is best directed by a foot and ankle surgeon and may include one or more of the following:

Nonsteroidal or steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
Physical therapy
Bracing
Surgical intervention
Last edited by aznnorth on Dec 24th, 2017 10:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
If the glove don't fit you must acquit! #WINNING
Newbie
Oct 13, 2017
19 posts
5 upvotes
brookewalker813 wrote:
Dec 18th, 2017 2:00 pm
I have sprained my ankle very badly, this happened October 13th. I was on crutches for a week, then a walking boot for 4 weeks, then limping for 2 weeks. About 2 weeks ago I started running and swimming and doing sports again
Did you check with your doctor do all these? I think you need go see the doctor again and get some physio time. I would be quite concern if I was still limping for 2 weeks after a 5-week of crutches and walking boot. I would probably put the walking boot back on if I was limping more than a few days. I have had cast and walking boot before, it took a day or two to get used to be walking again, but not for 2 weeks. I remembered I walked with some discomfort for about a week, and maybe another 1-2 weeks to be 80%.

Top