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Star Wars Episode IX J.J. Abrams December 20 2019 (formerly Colin Trevorrow May 24 2019)

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  • Oct 19th, 2017 10:14 pm
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On the other hand look at the DC universe and there struggles for not having a vision and not firing a certain director..... Someone else directs and they make their biggest/best movie yet.

It seems Disney/Marvel kind of knows what the want to do, but is struggling finding directors to execute the vision.
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I think the Disney/Marvel/Lucasfilm strategy is to look for relatively inexperienced directors (with a few exceptions, like J.J. Abrams, Edgar Wright or Joss Whedon) who they want to control (no way these guys are getting final cut). Most of the Marvel movies have been relatively smooth, with the directors doing what they're told. Edgar Wright and Ant-Man is the notable exception. For the Star Wars movies, they've been following a similar process, but these SW directors are trying to follow their own creative impulses, which is not what Lucasfilm necessarily wants. It's got to be a PR nightmare for Lucasfilm, as this is the fourth time a SW director has either been fired (Josh Trank, Lord & Miller, Colin Trevorrow) or had his project taken away from him (Gareth Edwards) in the past few years. They're going to have a hard time hiring young, fresh and creative directors if their rep in Hollywood is to only make movies as they want.
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Trevorrow seemed like the droid Disney was looking for
I've yet to see Jurassic World but I suspect it's very much like Force Awakens -- a familiar story adequately retold
Maybe Rian Johnson knocked it outta the park and now Disney is swinging for the fences (a fan can dream)
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Curious who the replacement will be? I'm hoping for somebody as talented as James Gunn. Thought he did a great job with both "Guardians of the Galaxy" movies.

I'm guessing we are going to get our first SW female director for this one? Who wants to bet me on this one? LOL
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zod wrote:
Sep 5th, 2017 6:56 pm
On the other hand look at the DC universe and there struggles for not having a vision and not firing a certain director..... Someone else directs and they make their biggest/best movie yet.

It seems Disney/Marvel kind of knows what the want to do, but is struggling finding directors to execute the vision.

well disneys vision for star wars is to ***** it out with merchandise sales and rip off previous star wars movies.
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Mr_Fanta wrote:
Sep 5th, 2017 8:18 pm
I'm guessing we are going to get our first SW female director for this one? Who wants to bet me on this one?
I'll take that bet
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jenviea wrote:
Sep 5th, 2017 8:24 pm
I'll take that bet
Bah, I just want a free "Dunkirk" pass to see Christopher Nolan's TIFF Q&A at the Cinesphere for this Sunday. Doubt we'll know the replacement director by then.
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Talamasca wrote:
Sep 5th, 2017 7:36 pm
I think the Disney/Marvel/Lucasfilm strategy is to look for relatively inexperienced directors (with a few exceptions, like J.J. Abrams, Edgar Wright or Joss Whedon) who they want to control (no way these guys are getting final cut). Most of the Marvel movies have been relatively smooth, with the directors doing what they're told. Edgar Wright and Ant-Man is the notable exception. For the Star Wars movies, they've been following a similar process, but these SW directors are trying to follow their own creative impulses, which is not what Lucasfilm necessarily wants. It's got to be a PR nightmare for Lucasfilm, as this is the fourth time a SW director has either been fired (Josh Trank, Lord & Miller, Colin Trevorrow) or had his project taken away from him (Gareth Edwards) in the past few years. They're going to have a hard time hiring young, fresh and creative directors if their rep in Hollywood is to only make movies as they want.
I don't even think Marvel has an issue with directors. Yes, Edgar Wright left but people forget he was working on Ant-Man from well before the Marvel Cinematic Universe had even started. By the time, the MCU took off, he was unwilling to change plans and play ball so they had no choice but to let him go. I think the only one for the MCU with actual director issues was Patty Jenkins for Thor 2 although Jon Favreau obviously had issues with creating Iron Man 2.

People think this is a PR nightmare for Lucasfilm (although owned by Disney, the decisions probably belong to Kathleen Kennedy). I think this is actually a good move. There is nothing from Colin Trevarrow that shows me he can make an excellent Star Wars film. His last movie was universally panned and although Jurassic World did very well, its not an engaging film beyond the dinosaurs. Rian Johnson has at least shown vision with his film Looper and thats the kind of thing they need for Star Wars. Even if you don't like the Force Awakens, JJ is a very safe director that has been shown to revive franchises. He successfully restarted Star Wars and Star Trek.
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thechampion116 wrote:
Sep 6th, 2017 1:17 pm
I don't even think Marvel has an issue with directors. Yes, Edgar Wright left but people forget he was working on Ant-Man from well before the Marvel Cinematic Universe had even started. By the time, the MCU took off, he was unwilling to change plans and play ball so they had no choice but to let him go. I think the only one for the MCU with actual director issues was Patty Jenkins for Thor 2 although Jon Favreau obviously had issues with creating Iron Man 2.
Nope, Alan Taylor has also publicly expressed how tough an experience it was with Thor: The Dark World. Kevin Feige, just like Kathleen Kennedy, runs the MCU with an iron fist (but not Iron Fist; that's on Netflix! :D). It's either his way or the highway. It's just that most of the directors of MCU movies have fallen in line. There were two notable directors, Ava Duvernay and Patty Jenkins, who were in discussions to direct MCU movies, but they backed out when they realized they would have greatly reduced freedom to direct as they wished.

Alan Taylor: "“I’ve learned that you don’t make a $170 million movie with someone else’s money, and not have to collaborate a lot,” he said. “The Marvel experience was particularly wrenching because I was sort of given absolute freedom while we were shooting, and then in post it turned into a different movie. So, that is something I hope never to repeat and don’t wish upon anybody else.”

Directors love having creative freedom. The latest movie from Lucasfilm is basically confirming to all the directors out there that you better play by our rules if you want to make a Star Wars movie.
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Talamasca wrote:
Sep 6th, 2017 1:29 pm
Nope, Alan Taylor has also publicly expressed how tough an experience it was with Thor: The Dark World. Kevin Feige, just like Kathleen Kennedy, runs the MCU with an iron fist (but not Iron Fist; that's on Netflix! :D). It's either his way or the highway. It's just that most of the directors of MCU movies have fallen in line. There were two notable directors, Ava Duvernay and Patty Jenkins, who were in discussions to direct MCU movies, but they backed out when they realized they would have greatly reduced freedom to direct as they wished.

Alan Taylor: "“I’ve learned that you don’t make a $170 million movie with someone else’s money, and not have to collaborate a lot,” he said. “The Marvel experience was particularly wrenching because I was sort of given absolute freedom while we were shooting, and then in post it turned into a different movie. So, that is something I hope never to repeat and don’t wish upon anybody else.”

Directors love having creative freedom. The latest movie from Lucasfilm is basically confirming to all the directors out there that you better play by our rules if you want to make a Star Wars movie.
Yes, its very difficult that you have to collaborate when someone hands you $170 million. As a director given large budgets, you still have to work within the confines of the company you work for. You do have creative liberties but there are probably story beats or end goals that you need to reach. How you get there is where your freedom lies. Ava Duvernay and Patty Jenkins I don't think Duvernay signed to work with Marvel but she passed on Black Panther. Thats another example actually. You look at a guy like Ryan Coogler who brought in all his people to help him create his vision of Black Panther while still working with Kevin Feige. Feige obviously liked the vision and let him do his movie.

Rian Johnson has said multiple times that he has the freedom to make Episode VIII the way he wanted. He said there was no template he had to work from. He is the most logical person to finish the trilogy as well. The first movie was all set-up. The middle movie should be the one that changes everything up and its his vision that should end the trilogy since he is making the big decisions for these characters now.
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man this new trailer is taking foreverrrr
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ez_86 wrote:
Sep 7th, 2017 9:58 am
man this new trailer is taking foreverrrr
But they haven't started fliming episode 9 yet..................
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Any director, coming in thinking they are going to have complete creative control and final cut on someone else's multi billion dollar franchise, is dillusional at best.
Baaaaaaaaa!
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sharpshooter88 wrote:
Sep 7th, 2017 1:30 pm
Any director, coming in thinking they are going to have complete creative control and final cut on someone else's multi billion dollar franchise, is dillusional at best.
I don't think they come in with that expectation. They are usually promised collaboratiion with the producers, studio, etc. It's when the bosses decide things aren't going well that the fighting usually begins. Hollywood is littered with movies with infamous productions. There was a fascinating documentary on Netflix (not sure if it's still there) about the behind the scenes of The Island of Dr. Moreau, Marlon Brando's last film. It was eye opening as to how much of a (*&#$&*#$ filmmaking can be.

There are very few directors who get final cut. Only the biggest names (Spielberg, Cameron, Fincher, etc.) get that.

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