Shopping Discussion

Stores Can't Force you to Show ID With Your Credit Card

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  • Jun 1st, 2008 9:13 am
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Deal Fanatic
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Jun 22, 2004
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Ron wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 1:24 am
On the MasterCard USA site is says very clearly that "The merchant/retailer required identification" is a violation!

I'm one of those who are bothered when asked for ID when it is not required by law and is not for my benefit. I have a right to privacy and I will exercise that right because if I don’t, the right will disappear by the time I really need it.

Are you comfortable with the cashier having your address, your age, and date of birth? It’s none of their business!
Do you want to buy $5000 in home electronics just to have your house "randomly" broken into the next week?

I have refused thousands of dollars in transactions to merchants who asked for photo ID.
There must be some loop hole because when in Vegas, I spent hundreds at different stores (mostly smaller amount purchases) and every single cashier insisted on seeing my DL. Another thing in Vegas, and I started seeing this recently in Washington State too, is their gas stations require your zip code to fill up at the pump. If you don't have a zip code (Canadians don't) you have to go inside and they preauthorize $50 or $70 on your card. They also asked for your ID because of the high incidence of fraud in the Vegas.

I dont understand the gas station's management's rationale since if somebody stole my CC and it's used, it's my understanding that the merchant gets his money but the CC company is out and the maximum I am out is $50. Supposedly, they're doing this to protect me?

Also, this is off topic but it's my understanding that a merchant here isn't suppose to charge me an additional fee or percentage for paying by credit card vs cash and a customer isn't suppose to be charged by the merchant a fee to use Interac or a debit card instead of cash. Most computer stores do this. Only a bank can charge me, where applicable.

It seems merchants are doing a lot of things that they supposedly arent permitted but the banks aren't stopping them or punishing them for doing so.
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Apr 6, 2003
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 3:16 am
I dont understand the gas station's management's rationale since if somebody stole my CC and it's used, it's my understanding that the merchant gets his money but the CC company is out and the maximum I am out is $50. Supposedly, they're doing this to protect me?
Sorry Pavel, wrong again. Where do you get this incorrect information?

If the signatures don't match, the merchant loses the money. If the signatures do match and the merchant can prove you authorized the transaction, you pay. The CC company always wins.

As I explained in my other post, the merchants are only protecting themselves.
Sr. Member
Apr 6, 2003
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Toronto
Pavel wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 3:16 am
Also, this is off topic but it's my understanding that a merchant here isn't suppose to charge me an additional fee or percentage for paying by credit card vs cash and a customer isn't suppose to be charged by the merchant a fee to use Interac or a debit card instead of cash. Most computer stores do this.
Read the policy again. A merchant is not allowed to charge extra for using CC but the merchant is allowed to give a discount for paying in cash :)
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Sep 11, 2006
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KELOWNA
I haven't read this whole thread but this was an issue that I called CC companies about. I was told they have no problem with stores requesting ID and that if I refused it was between the store and I. Not impressed let me tell you and I let them know that I'd be using my AmX (it has a picture) until such time as they made their own cards more secure. No way I am handing a cashier or anyone else my ID.
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Jun 30, 2007
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urban1 wrote:
Dec 11th, 2007 2:54 pm
Why do stores ask for ID anyways? If its not in the agreement they have with the card issuer, what do they care? If its stolen or cloned, wouldnt the issuer eat the loss and not the store?

simply put, the issuer indeed does not cover the loss. they blame the merchant and make them prove six ways to sunday that they did everything right to finalize the sale. heaven forbid the signature on the sales slip is not an immaculate photocopy of what is on file at the issuer.

it's especially hard on smaller businesses that can't eat the loss.
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 3:16 am
Another thing in Vegas, and I started seeing this recently in Washington State too, is their gas stations require your zip code to fill up at the pump. If you don't have a zip code (Canadians don't) you have to go inside and they preauthorize $50 or $70 on your card. They also asked for your ID because of the high incidence of fraud in the Vegas.

that's a nice feature. i didn't know they were using address verification at gas station pumps. damn teknologies =p pretty cool.
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Jun 22, 2004
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Ron wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 4:59 am
Sorry Pavel, wrong again. Where do you get this incorrect information?
Which part? The $50 liability is from the Mastercard agreement. The other part I got from a collegue many years ago who's wife worked in a bank.
Ron wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 4:59 am
If the signatures don't match, the merchant loses the money. If the signatures do match and the merchant can prove you authorized the transaction, you pay. The CC company always wins.

As I explained in my other post, the merchants are only protecting themselves.
Well that makes sense and it doesn't. I can go to a self-serve cashier and make an X as a signature on the electronic pad. I can rack up several hundred $ worth of goods, say, groceries. I can then call my credit card company and say my card is lost/stolen. The signature won't match. It's the credit card company, that I was told that has to eat the charge. That's why their interest rates are so high because of the fraud and the losses they have from fraudulent activity. Again, this is what I was told.
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Jun 22, 2004
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Ron wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 5:00 am
Read the policy again. A merchant is not allowed to charge extra for using CC but the merchant is allowed to give a discount for paying in cash :)
Sneaky. However, some merchants charge their customers an extra fee for using interac or their debit card. I was told that they're not suppose to do this but clearly, there's no enforcement. It's possible I was given misinformation. :?:
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 24th, 2007 2:41 am
Well that makes sense and it doesn't. I can go to a self-serve cashier and make an X as a signature on the electronic pad. I can rack up several hundred $ worth of goods, say, groceries. I can then call my credit card company and say my card is lost/stolen. The signature won't match. It's the credit card company, that I was told that has to eat the charge. That's why their interest rates are so high because of the fraud and the losses they have from fraudulent activity. Again, this is what I was told.

nope. it is the store's responsibility to match your card to your receipt. there is an attendant on duty at that station that is supposed to do just that. they get lazy :)
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Apr 6, 2003
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 24th, 2007 2:41 am
Well that makes sense and it doesn't. I can go to a self-serve cashier and make an X as a signature on the electronic pad. I can rack up several hundred $ worth of goods, say, groceries. I can then call my credit card company and say my card is lost/stolen. The signature won't match.
The merchant will then get a chargeback and be forced to return the money. The merchant will then take the footage from their security cameras and send it over to the police, who will then come and have a talk with you, and perhaps you'll be charged with fraud, theft, or some other relevant criminal offense.
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Apr 6, 2003
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 24th, 2007 2:45 am
Sneaky. However, some merchants charge their customers an extra fee for using interac or their debit card. I was told that they're not suppose to do this but clearly, there's no enforcement. It's possible I was given misinformation. :?:
It, like many other things, gets enforced when it gets reported.
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Jun 21, 2004
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Pavel wrote:
Dec 24th, 2007 2:41 am
Which part? The $50 liability is from the Mastercard agreement. The other part I got from a collegue many years ago who's wife worked in a bank.



Well that makes sense and it doesn't. I can go to a self-serve cashier and make an X as a signature on the electronic pad. I can rack up several hundred $ worth of goods, say, groceries. I can then call my credit card company and say my card is lost/stolen. The signature won't match. It's the credit card company, that I was told that has to eat the charge. That's why their interest rates are so high because of the fraud and the losses they have from fraudulent activity. Again, this is what I was told.
yes you can do thing like that
even if you going to a store buying stuff. You can sign it differently and then call the CC and get the charged back.

alot of store they will never really match the signature on the CC and the bill

But just remember they will have record of that on your file.

If you have alot of charged back and similar thing like that. Mostly they will not raise your Credit or they will put your file on the attention list.
And every time you are using something big you have to call in to confirm that it were you.

It will cause alot of trouble for you in the future
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Jun 21, 2004
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i worked at a phone store before and we got plenty of the Credit Card information and full Driver licensed copied.

if you really care about your privacy then never go and apply for anything cuz you will have to provide them all the information


I worked at a phone store before and i know they would lose a lot of money for this matter so we later have to check ID for all the purchase more than $200

it's just take 5 sec to take out your ID (since you need to take out your CC ) and for employee to match both then return it to you. They are not recording it or anything. They just want to make sure they got the work done right.
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Dec 23, 2005
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Dustbunny wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2007 5:25 am
I haven't read this whole thread but this was an issue that I called CC companies about. I was told they have no problem with stores requesting ID and that if I refused it was between the store and I. Not impressed let me tell you and I let them know that I'd be using my AmX (it has a picture) until such time as they made their own cards more secure. No way I am handing a cashier or anyone else my ID.

They do have a problem with it. They are not allowed to ask and its in the thier merchant aggreement.

This is the response I got from BMO Mastercard.

Dear Cardholder,


We acknowledge receipt of your E-mail and regret learning of the
circumstances prompting you to write.


To clarify, when a MasterCard logo is displayed by a business to show the
card is welcome, a merchant cannot require additional identification as a
standard business practice when you use MasterCard for payment (except for
cash advances).



When you experience a problem with a merchant/retailer accepting your
MasterCard card, you may file a complaint against said merchant by
e-mailing MasterCard International at CustomerServiceCenter@mastercard.com,
or contacting their customer services at 1 800 300-3069 (available within
US and Canada).


Please include the following information so their customer service staff
can better serve you:


? Your name
? Merchant name
? Merchant address
? The nature of the problem you wish to report.


We thank you for allowing us this opportunity to address your concerns.


Sincerely,
GM/Card & Retail Payment Services - BMO Bank of Montreal
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