Pets

Studies suggest feeding raw diet to pets is BAD - not recommended by various veterinary association and FDA

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 7th, 2019 9:09 pm
Member
Apr 19, 2018
321 posts
239 upvotes
The only anecdotal evidence I have heard about raw food diets come from an acquaintance who claims his 9 year old rottweiler thrives on it. Can't say I agree since the dog is somewhat overweight and has arthritis pain. My own 9 year old border collie staffie mix has always been on Orijen commercial food supplemented with a weekly egg, a fish oil dose in the food ever second day (for skin and coat) and a daily dose of glucosamine used for joint health as recommended by our vet. Our dog is very healthy, has good energy, is at an ideal weight but did need to have her teeth cleaned last year. I quickly learned about brushing the dog's teeth and have had no dental or gum problem since. The question of a raw food diet is probably more a matter of personal preference when compared to a high quality commercial dog food with appropriate supplements depending on the particular dog's needs.

One has to remember that unlike felines, dogs are scavengers for the most part and actually have a diet more varied than just meat (carrots and apples come to mind) although grains aren't generally part of that.
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
932 posts
237 upvotes
Toronto
I switched to raw about a year ago for my small maltese. The quantity of poop is reduced to about 25% of before on kibble. Also, it's more of a whitish/grey dry chalk consistency instead of the brown stuff.

This basically means I don't need to pickup anymore when at home or if nobody is watching when outside. It basically dissolves in about a day or 2.

The wild rabbits that poop in my backyard produces more stuff than my dog per sitting.

This probably don't apply for a medium to large size dogs, but it sure works well for me.
Newbie
Feb 14, 2015
70 posts
18 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Please don't do this, be a responsible pet owner and pick up after your pets whether they are fed raw or not.
NubNub wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 12:23 pm
I switched to raw about a year ago for my small maltese. The quantity of poop is reduced to about 25% of before on kibble. Also, it's more of a whitish/grey dry chalk consistency instead of the brown stuff.

This basically means I don't need to pickup anymore when at home or if nobody is watching when outside. It basically dissolves in about a day or 2.

The wild rabbits that poop in my backyard produces more stuff than my dog per sitting.

This probably don't apply for a medium to large size dogs, but it sure works well for me.
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
505 posts
309 upvotes
Markham, ON
so i get why commercial food is bad because of corn, fillers and all the chemicals...

but why raw? What if you feed your pets cooked real food? (i.e. boiled chicken breast, vegetable,etc. Same raw food, just cooked)

Does cooking the meat make the food worst for dogs & cats?
Deal Addict
Nov 1, 2001
1718 posts
77 upvotes
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 12:07 pm
so i get why commercial food is bad because of corn, fillers and all the chemicals...

but why raw? What if you feed your pets cooked real food? (i.e. boiled chicken breast, vegetable,etc. Same raw food, just cooked)

Does cooking the meat make the food worst for dogs & cats?
Cooking the food destroys a lot of the nutrients.
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
505 posts
309 upvotes
Markham, ON
Kaz wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 12:37 pm
Cooking the food destroys a lot of the nutrients.
So what if there is a bit less nutrients...?
i mean...it is good enough for us?
to me.... having slightly less nutrients outweighs the potential hazard of raw food.
The food choice probably matters a lot more when it comes with nutrients too (i.e. I am sure cooked spinach and chicken breast is still more nutritious than raw lettuce and raw ground beef)
Deal Addict
Nov 1, 2001
1718 posts
77 upvotes
I've had mine on a raw diet for 2 years. 50 lbs and 10 lbs.
I feed a mixture of bone in chicken, beef,pork and duck with beef liver and kidneys.
I follow the 80-10-5-5 guideline of protein-bone-liver and other secreting organ.
I grind everything and mix it together just because it's easier for me to feed that way.
One gets 16oz per day and the other 7oz.
I usually make 60-80 lbs at a time and portion it out and freeze it. good for 6 weeks +.
I buy the meat on sale when possible and aim for a cost of under $2.50 lb.
I take everything out the day before and unthaw it overnight.
They also get eggs a few times a week and veggies and sardines or fish oil..
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 20, 2016
846 posts
374 upvotes
Toronto
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 3:51 pm
So what if there is a bit less nutrients...?
i mean...it is good enough for us?
to me.... having slightly less nutrients outweighs the potential hazard of raw food.
The food choice probably matters a lot more when it comes with nutrients too (i.e. I am sure cooked spinach and chicken breast is still more nutritious than raw lettuce and raw ground beef)
It's a long battle between raw and cooked, pros and cons yeah. If you're going with cooked just make sure to NOT feed cooked bones, as they will get brittle and may splinter. Raw bones they can chew on.

But diving a bit on outweigh potential hazards of raw food, it's a bit "complicated". This is a good read: https://feline-nutrition.org/nutrition/ ... a-raw-food
huuuu! (¬'-')¬ C-('-'Q) straight!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 29, 2012
5116 posts
2786 upvotes
While I have no doubt that raw is more nutritious for the pet, I absolutely do not trust the food sources of pet food suppliers. They will get away with anything they can, because they know that a cat that becomes ill due to consuming tainted product cannot sue them. Sorry but I go with cooked.

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