Pets

Studies suggest feeding raw diet to pets is BAD - not recommended by various veterinary association and FDA

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 24th, 2019 10:26 am
Member
Apr 19, 2018
347 posts
259 upvotes
Kitchener/Waterloo, …
The only anecdotal evidence I have heard about raw food diets come from an acquaintance who claims his 9 year old rottweiler thrives on it. Can't say I agree since the dog is somewhat overweight and has arthritis pain. My own 9 year old border collie staffie mix has always been on Orijen commercial food supplemented with a weekly egg, a fish oil dose in the food ever second day (for skin and coat) and a daily dose of glucosamine used for joint health as recommended by our vet. Our dog is very healthy, has good energy, is at an ideal weight but did need to have her teeth cleaned last year. I quickly learned about brushing the dog's teeth and have had no dental or gum problem since. The question of a raw food diet is probably more a matter of personal preference when compared to a high quality commercial dog food with appropriate supplements depending on the particular dog's needs.

One has to remember that unlike felines, dogs are scavengers for the most part and actually have a diet more varied than just meat (carrots and apples come to mind) although grains aren't generally part of that.
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
964 posts
248 upvotes
Toronto
I switched to raw about a year ago for my small maltese. The quantity of poop is reduced to about 25% of before on kibble. Also, it's more of a whitish/grey dry chalk consistency instead of the brown stuff.

This basically means I don't need to pickup anymore when at home or if nobody is watching when outside. It basically dissolves in about a day or 2.

The wild rabbits that poop in my backyard produces more stuff than my dog per sitting.

This probably don't apply for a medium to large size dogs, but it sure works well for me.
Newbie
Feb 14, 2015
80 posts
22 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Please don't do this, be a responsible pet owner and pick up after your pets whether they are fed raw or not.
NubNub wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 12:23 pm
I switched to raw about a year ago for my small maltese. The quantity of poop is reduced to about 25% of before on kibble. Also, it's more of a whitish/grey dry chalk consistency instead of the brown stuff.

This basically means I don't need to pickup anymore when at home or if nobody is watching when outside. It basically dissolves in about a day or 2.

The wild rabbits that poop in my backyard produces more stuff than my dog per sitting.

This probably don't apply for a medium to large size dogs, but it sure works well for me.
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
602 posts
374 upvotes
Markham, ON
so i get why commercial food is bad because of corn, fillers and all the chemicals...

but why raw? What if you feed your pets cooked real food? (i.e. boiled chicken breast, vegetable,etc. Same raw food, just cooked)

Does cooking the meat make the food worst for dogs & cats?
Deal Addict
Nov 1, 2001
1756 posts
81 upvotes
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 12:07 pm
so i get why commercial food is bad because of corn, fillers and all the chemicals...

but why raw? What if you feed your pets cooked real food? (i.e. boiled chicken breast, vegetable,etc. Same raw food, just cooked)

Does cooking the meat make the food worst for dogs & cats?
Cooking the food destroys a lot of the nutrients.
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
602 posts
374 upvotes
Markham, ON
Kaz wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 12:37 pm
Cooking the food destroys a lot of the nutrients.
So what if there is a bit less nutrients...?
i mean...it is good enough for us?
to me.... having slightly less nutrients outweighs the potential hazard of raw food.
The food choice probably matters a lot more when it comes with nutrients too (i.e. I am sure cooked spinach and chicken breast is still more nutritious than raw lettuce and raw ground beef)
Deal Addict
Nov 1, 2001
1756 posts
81 upvotes
I've had mine on a raw diet for 2 years. 50 lbs and 10 lbs.
I feed a mixture of bone in chicken, beef,pork and duck with beef liver and kidneys.
I follow the 80-10-5-5 guideline of protein-bone-liver and other secreting organ.
I grind everything and mix it together just because it's easier for me to feed that way.
One gets 16oz per day and the other 7oz.
I usually make 60-80 lbs at a time and portion it out and freeze it. good for 6 weeks +.
I buy the meat on sale when possible and aim for a cost of under $2.50 lb.
I take everything out the day before and unthaw it overnight.
They also get eggs a few times a week and veggies and sardines or fish oil..
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 20, 2016
1130 posts
713 upvotes
Toronto
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 18th, 2018 3:51 pm
So what if there is a bit less nutrients...?
i mean...it is good enough for us?
to me.... having slightly less nutrients outweighs the potential hazard of raw food.
The food choice probably matters a lot more when it comes with nutrients too (i.e. I am sure cooked spinach and chicken breast is still more nutritious than raw lettuce and raw ground beef)
It's a long battle between raw and cooked, pros and cons yeah. If you're going with cooked just make sure to NOT feed cooked bones, as they will get brittle and may splinter. Raw bones they can chew on.

But diving a bit on outweigh potential hazards of raw food, it's a bit "complicated". This is a good read: https://feline-nutrition.org/nutrition/ ... a-raw-food
huuuu! (¬'-')¬ C-('-'Q) straight!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 29, 2012
5706 posts
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While I have no doubt that raw is more nutritious for the pet, I absolutely do not trust the food sources of pet food suppliers. They will get away with anything they can, because they know that a cat that becomes ill due to consuming tainted product cannot sue them. Sorry but I go with cooked.
Jr. Member
Sep 20, 2010
144 posts
34 upvotes
Hamilton
Just wanted to bump this as I am a new dog owner. Currently feeding our 8 lb 6 month old havanese fromms gold puppy kibble. So much info about raw vs non raw. I keep hearing good things about big country raw.

Anyone have experience with this? Our vet has told us to feed kibble and stay away from anything that says grain free.
Sr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
517 posts
342 upvotes
Toronto
kobe360 wrote:
Mar 11th, 2019 12:04 pm
Just wanted to bump this as I am a new dog owner. Currently feeding our 8 lb 6 month old havanese fromms gold puppy kibble. So much info about raw vs non raw. I keep hearing good things about big country raw.

Anyone have experience with this? Our vet has told us to feed kibble and stay away from anything that says grain free.
I feed my French bulldog commercial frozen raw shipped to my house from either Big Country Raw or more recently Back2Raw. My dog had a lot of allergies- constantly chewing on her feet, and has stopped doing that since switching to raw. Duck seems to be the best protein for her, but I rotate amongst duck,beef,pork, rabbit, and turkey. I'd recommend either company, although theoretically Back2Raw should be better since it has 10% bone vs Big Country Raw having 15% bone content. It's more of a commitment in terms of having to store the food frozen then thaw it out in refrigerator about 24 hr before serving. Also family and friends are less likely to watch your dog if they have to feed it raw.

Since your dog doesn't have allergies I'd probably try switching to a dehydrated raw like Canisource GrandCru grain free, which didn't solve my dog's allergies, but is healthier than an extruded dog food. Or maybe try the best extruded dog kibble on the market , Carna4 grain free duck, since it's the only one with sprouted seeds in it.
Sr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
517 posts
342 upvotes
Toronto
Enlgma wrote:
Dec 2nd, 2018 11:24 pm
The only anecdotal evidence I have heard about raw food diets come from an acquaintance who claims his 9 year old rottweiler thrives on it. Can't say I agree since the dog is somewhat overweight and has arthritis pain. My own 9 year old border collie staffie mix has always been on Orijen commercial food supplemented with a weekly egg, a fish oil dose in the food ever second day (for skin and coat) and a daily dose of glucosamine used for joint health as recommended by our vet. Our dog is very healthy, has good energy, is at an ideal weight but did need to have her teeth cleaned last year. I quickly learned about brushing the dog's teeth and have had no dental or gum problem since. The question of a raw food diet is probably more a matter of personal preference when compared to a high quality commercial dog food with appropriate supplements depending on the particular dog's needs.

One has to remember that unlike felines, dogs are scavengers for the most part and actually have a diet more varied than just meat (carrots and apples come to mind) although grains aren't generally part of that.
Your comparison isn't really fair since mixed breeds are usually healthier than pure bred dogs. I used to have a mixed breed who was extremely healthy, and at the time I didn't know better and was feeding her poor quality dog food like Beneful. She still lived to 14 years of age.
Member
Apr 19, 2018
347 posts
259 upvotes
Kitchener/Waterloo, …
Bull Dog wrote:
Mar 12th, 2019 7:26 am
Your comparison isn't really fair since mixed breeds are usually healthier than pure bred dogs. I used to have a mixed breed who was extremely healthy, and at the time I didn't know better and was feeding her poor quality dog food like Beneful. She still lived to 14 years of age.
Anecdotal evidence is neither fair nor scientific. Your observations are just as valid as mine. I know nothing of Purina's Beneful brand, but a quick look on the internet debunks that story:.

I do know that cheap or no name brands do have ingredients that can harm any pet over the long term which is why we did research and questioned the vet before picking the brand we now use.

Purebred dogs do have breed specific health problems , but weight gain is mostly a matter of caloric intake and arthritis is more than likely induced or aggravated by excess weight regardless of whether a dog is pure bred or a mutt.

My thoughts on the matter is that t is better to go with what a trusted and qualified vet says than unverified junk science and unsubstantiated claims I can find on the internet.
Sr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
517 posts
342 upvotes
Toronto
Enlgma wrote:
Mar 12th, 2019 10:56 am
Anecdotal evidence is neither fair nor scientific. Your observations are just as valid as mine. I know nothing of Purina's Beneful brand, but a quick look on the internet debunks that story:.

I do know that cheap or no name brands do have ingredients that can harm any pet over the long term which is why we did research and questioned the vet before picking the brand we now use.

Purebred dogs do have breed specific health problems , but weight gain is mostly a matter of caloric intake and arthritis is more than likely induced or aggravated by excess weight regardless of whether a dog is pure bred or a mutt.

My thoughts on the matter is that t is better to go with what a trusted and qualified vet says than unverified junk science and unsubstantiated claims I can find on the internet.
Orijen is a great dog food, but my French bulldog continued to chew her paws while on it, so I know that for her frozen raw has worked miracles. If I did what most vets would recommend, she'd be on commercial kibble and some immunosupressant such as Apoquel.
Member
Apr 19, 2018
347 posts
259 upvotes
Kitchener/Waterloo, …
Bull Dog wrote:
Mar 12th, 2019 6:39 pm
Orijen is a great dog food, but my French bulldog continued to chew her paws while on it, so I know that for her frozen raw has worked miracles. If I did what most vets would recommend, she'd be on commercial kibble and some immunosupressant such as Apoquel.
The operative word. I used was "trusted". Not all vets are equal and some are not all that good. Like the decision process to select the food we use, it took a while to find a trustworthy vet. We picked our brand based on our research and the results achieved. It obviously won't work for all dogs. Our son's Frenchie also has problems with itching. He uses Royal Canin dog food, does frequent washing and uses something to deal with anxiety as prescribed by the vet. He fed raw food to his previous BullPei among the diet changes he tried to resolve constant itching but that did not resolve much of that dog's heath problems. It died at 9 years.

The brand that works for us may not work as well for others. I certainly wouldn't go around making a pitch about the brand we currently use to other owners, but if they ask us about it, I will let them know what our experience has been. I'm just not sold on the raw diet as the be all and end all to good health for dogs and neither is our vet. Dogs aren't wolves and have evolved sufficiently that their dietary needs are different from that of wolves. They have evolved to depend on us to look after them and I find it a shame that some owners treat their dogs as an experiment in quack medicine.

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