Art and Photography

Sunflower fields (Ontario)

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Pochacco wrote:
Jul 28th, 2018 9:52 pm
Bogle Seeds

SUNFLOWER UPDATE AS OF JULY 28, 2018:

Due to the overwhelming turn out today, the Hamilton Police have been called and they have shut down our sunflower viewing/photography for the season. There will be no more sunflower viewing/photography allowed.
LOLOL
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Hwy6 already a notorious death trap in history, then you have people illegally parking up and down it on either side after flooding the Bogle’s parking lot and side road, without a care crossing over 5 lanes with children, vehicles still trying to turn into Safari causing gridlock beyond the dedicated turn lanes. Normally it's already a busy highway 80-100km/h, only a matter of time before serious injury or death. Police are situated there now 24/7 to deter the entitled or ignorant. It's a shame as Mr. Bogle and his family are genuine hard working nice people (just look at his hands, and yes, that's an old school Casio calculator watch). I'm sure the funds were for his retirement and to maintain the farm legacy, heard him talk 3y ago, a very humble man:

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https://www.facebook.com/mcmeneal/video ... 131366302/
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Aug 31, 2008
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How is Davis Feed on a weekend? This might be the last weekend and I want to go but not if it was as crazy as Bogle's.
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We did Edwards Farm Store in Innisfil this weekend and it was nice. $5/car.
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bvit6667 wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 11:08 am
For anyone who is interested, there is a field of sunflowers on the north side of Myrtle Road West in Whitby. Myrtle Road runs east and west from Highway 12 (Baldwin Street) in Whitby. The field is a km or two west of Hwy 12 - you can't miss it.
Anyone know if this field exists this year ?
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‘We’re closed forever!’: How the search for the perfect selfie led to bedlam at an Ontario sunflower farm

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/ ... ower-farm/


PATRICK WHITE
PUBLISHED JULY 31, 2018

Visitors flooded the farm to see its more than one million sunflowers, forcing the family to close its unlikely attraction ‘for good.’

J.P. MOCZULSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

There’s one thing the Bogle family wants to make clear off the top: no more pictures.

Their sunflower farm is closed to Facebookers, Instagrammers, Snapchatters (Snappers?) and all the other social-media looky-loos who tromped over their crops and plugged local roads for kilometres around over the weekend.

Closed not just for today, this week or this month.

“We’re closed forever!” Marlene Bogle yells politely to yet another minivan full of sunflower seekers stopping at the edge of her Millgrove, Ont., driveway Tuesday.

The Bogles opened up their farm to photographers on July 20, charging $7.50 an adult.

“Forever?” says the startled driver, who drove an hour from Toronto with a vanload of kids.

“Yep, for good,” she says.

Add the majestic sunflowers of Bogle Seeds to the list of good things spoiled by social media. The same fate has befallen some of the world’s most renowned attractions. Tourists taking Instagram-ready selfies have clogged up Santorini, Greece, with its distinctive blue rooftops, the Leaning Tower of Pisa and the Great Wall of China.

Now, they’re taking over the family farm.

“I can only describe it as like a zombie apocalypse,” says Brad Bogle, Marlene’s son.

It started mildly enough. The Bogles opened up their farm to photographers on July 20, charging $7.50 an adult. They had done the same thing three years ago, with a few hundred visitors providing a modest boost to their main business of farming sunflower, corn, millet, oats and barley, as well as selling various kinds of birdseed from their big red barn, which remains open for business.

This year, they hired eight staff at $22 an hour and rented some porta-potties to accommodate the crowds. Their parking lot holds 300 cars. For the first week, it was never more than one-third full. They met families from as far away as Dubai, New York and Australia and learned that many cultures consider the sunflower good luck.

“Everyone was laughing and having fun,” says Barry Bogle, Brad’s father, of that first week. “Then all of Toronto showed up.”

The apocalypse arrived on Saturday, the 28th. A few pictures of people posing among the roughly 1.4 million sunflowers had gone viral on Instagram. Cars began rolling up the driveway at 5:45 a.m. “We knew then something was up,” says Barry, who called Hamilton police for help.

By noon, the hordes were coming from all directions. People were parking as much as a kilometre away. The crowds started ignoring the overwhelmed farm staff, strolling into the fields without paying. Police told the Bogles that parents were crossing four lanes of traffic with strollers, people were getting in fender benders – one driver had his door ripped off by a passing car. One officer told the family they would be fined.

The Bogles tried their best to ward off the trespassers. “We asked one guy to leave, and he said, ‘Make me’ and wanted to fight,” Brad says.

Others were nicer. One man came out of the field holding an armload of garbage he’d picked up.

At one point, police told the Bogles that parents were crossing four lanes of traffic with strollers and people were getting in fender benders.

Hamilton police and the Ontario Provincial Police showed up to help with traffic. Around 2 p.m., they asked the family to shut down the operation and later closed Safari Road, which abuts the field. One officer told a neighbour police had estimated the crowd at 7,000 cars.

That night, the family barely slept as they fretted about the horrors that might await on Sunday.

Brad spent the next day going up and down the road asking people to leave. Some visitors didn’t take it well, telling him he’d ruined their vacation. A few neighbours gave him the finger for the traffic woes.

As of Tuesday, the traffic had died down, but the Bogles were still standing by the driveway like sentries. Many cars simply drove around the corner, where passengers got out on a side road and walked into the fields with selfie sticks, oblivious to the “No Trespassing” signs everywhere.

The Bogles won’t know the extent of the damage until they harvest the plants in late September or early October.

“It reminds me of the Yayoi Kusama exhibit in Toronto,” says Chelsea Caruso as she emerges cheerily from the field on Tuesday. “It’s Instagram that brought people here. It was a top post. There’s such good vibes here.”

The sunflower is a notoriously fragile crop. If the lower leaves are damaged, the plant becomes far less resistant to drought and disease. The Bogles won’t know the extent of the damage until they harvest the plants in late September or early October.

The same weekend the Bogles were overrun, a Winnipeg-area farmer said around two thousand people showed up at one of his fields knocking over flowers in search of the ideal shot.

“I used to love these flowers,” says Marlene, waving a Tesla away from the driveway. “Now I can’t stand 'em.”
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https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/th ... tario-farm

Thousands of sunflower selfie seekers bring chaos during 'Crazy Day' at Ontario farm

Within an hour, Bogle's 300-car parking lot was full. He looked out from the top of the laneway and there was a line of cars in both directions

The allure of a field of blooming sunflowers should not be underestimated.John Woods/The Canadian Press
Jake Edmiston
July 31, 2018
8:48 PM EDT

The phone at the Bogle birdseed farm in Hamilton, Ont., rang through to voicemail on Tuesday. It had been about 72 hours since the Crazy Day, as Brad Bogle was now calling it.

“Please be advised,” the voice on the answering machine said, “we are closed and will never open again for sunflower pictures.”

Brad Bogle, who runs the birdseed farm with his mom and dad, spent much of Tuesday guarding the entrance to their laneway, shooing people away, stopping them from pulling into his farm or parking on the side of the busy road that runs past their sunflower patch. Some did not take it so well.

“I’m getting the finger quite often,” Bogle, 36, said. “I’m getting people yelling at me. I’m getting people telling me, ‘I drove two hours, three hours, I deserve to get my picture taken.’”

Bogle’s neighbours laid out tires on their front lawns, or old stacks of wood, anything to deter the unwelcome visitors from parking on their properties. The problem, for this stretch of Safari Road, is Bogle’s sunflowers are in bloom and people are coming from all over for a photo with them.

“They want to be among the sunflowers,” he said. But there’s little room to park on the shoulder of Safari Road, leading to congestion, and near-misses with would-be photographers and speeding dump trucks. Three years ago — the last time crop rotation had the Bogle farm growing sunflowers — the Bogles thought they’d spare their neighbours all the trouble and just open up roughly a hectare on their farm for people to park and take their selfies and pictures. It was enough room for 300 cars, though only 100 cars or so came a day.

This year, with the sunflowers back again, the Bogles opened the parking lot again, charging $7.50 a person (kids under 12 were free) to tour the 1.3 kilometre walking path through the sunflower patch. They started on July 20 when the sunflowers started blooming and for a week it went well.

“Everything was great and then unfortunately, Saturday came,” Bogle said.

Saturday, July 28, the Crazy Day. Around 6:45 a.m., he was out with the dog for a walk when a car pulled up. They weren’t opening until 9 a.m. “Oh that’s a little bit crazy,” he remembered thinking. “Then, you know, we had a couple more.” By 8:30 a.m., there was a line of 20 or 30 cars at the laneway. His 72-year-old father called the police, to give them a heads up that something strange might be happening at the Bogle birdseed farm.

“I don’t know, we just got this weird feeling,” Bogle said.

Bogle opened early to keep them off Safari Road. Within an hour, his 300-car parking lot was full. He looked out from the top of the laneway and there was a line of cars in both directions, running for a kilometre west down Safari. Just to the east of the Bogle farm, Safari Road intersects with Highway 6 — a busy, shoulder-less, four-lane highway. The cars were clogging the highway.

Bogle’s neighbours opened their yards and their fields, charging a fee for people to park, and still it wasn’t enough. Then at mid-morning, nature intervened. It rained and people started filing out.

“Everything was looking good,” Bogle said. Then it wasn’t. The sun came back out and the line-ups on the road got worse. Bogle saw droves of people coming towards his farm. They had parked on Highway 6 — where there is “zero place to park — and hundreds were marching along Safari Road for a picture with the flowers.

Everything was great and then unfortunately, Saturday came

Police told the Hamilton Spectator that some were crossing the highway with children, some putting their hands up to stop traffic. “But live traffic doesn’t stop on that highway,” Staff-Sgt. Chris Hastings told the Spectator.

“I’ve been describing it as a zombie apocalypse,” Bogle said, guessing that roughly 7,000 came that day and around 1,000 didn’t pay the entrance fee. “One of my neighbours told me that he caught two people going to the bathroom in his front yard in his bushes.”

In the early afternoon, he and his mother were trying their best to clean the eight port-a-potties when one of his eight staff radioed to say the police were at the laneway. After speaking with the Hamilton Police officer, realizing the danger of all the crossings on the highway, the Bogles shut down the sunflower tours, potentially forever.

Still people keep coming – despite the pleas on the answering machine and the website and Facebook page — keen on sneaking into the farm for a photo to post online. It seems, Bugle said, media attention in the weeks before the sunflowers bloomed must have attracted the hoards. The Bogle farm also promoted it on its Facebook page.

But now, pacing the end of his laneway, Bogle is hoping his sunflowers start to drop their pedals already. In an interview Tuesday, he stressed one message, over and over: “People, please don’t come.”
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Edward Farm Store closed this weekend, as per the update on their FB page.


Thank you to all who have visited our field and welcome to those on their way!! DUE TO OVERWHELMING DEMAND... WE WILL BE CLOSED THIS SATURDAY (Aug 4) SUNDAY (Aug 5) AND MONDAY (Aug 6th) but will reopen on TUESDAY AUGUST 7TH for the remainder of the week.



Looks like Edwards farm may be afraid of what could happen after Bogle Seeds shut down their sunflowers field for good. Will Davis farm do the same ?
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https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton ... -1.4772294

'Chaos' erupts as thousands swarm Hamilton farm to take sunflower selfies

A Hamilton wild bird seed farm was forced to close after thousands of visitors created 'utter chaos'

Laura Clementson · CBC News · Posted: Aug 03, 2018 12:00 PM ET | Last Updated: August 3

For the people still bothering to drive to the Bogle seeds farm in Hamilton to snap a selfie with a sunflower, Barry and Marlene Bogle have a message — 'Go home. We're closed.'

The Bogle's have 1.6 million sunflower plants on 68 acres. And for more than a week, you could roam part of their field and take a picture before you head home. It cost $7.50 per adult, parking included.

It was a great idea for eight days. Then it became too great.

Everything went wrong. People were coming in, trespassing, knocking down our plants, stealing the heads. It was just chaos.

"Up until Saturday it was just another wonderful day at Bogle Seeds here," Barry Bogle said, "but soon as Saturday came it's just been so stressful."

"People started coming in from every direction in the farm and just thousands of people walking past our ticket booth."

Barry says some people cut the heads off the sunflowers, didn't bother paying for tickets, left garbage and " just basically took over our farm." Some, Barry says, even went as far as bringing a ladder into the field.

His son Brad, the sixth-generation of Bogles farming the land since 1874, described Saturday as a "zombie apocalypse."

The farm's parking lot holds about 300 cars but even that wasn't enough and people were parking where they shouldn't have.

Visitor Donald Morgan posted to Bogle Seed's Facebook page saying "I was there Saturday morning at about 9 a.m. and stayed until 11 a.m. The scene was chaotic. All roads backed up with traffic, people parking on the side of the highway, people trying to cross the highway ... even saw a fender bender while leaving."

The wild bird seed farm is in the Hamilton area of Flamborough at Highway 6 and Safari Road — a busy and often dangerous stretch of highway.


Everything was fantastic for those eight days, but then as soon as Saturday came somehow everybody from Toronto found out about us and they just descended upon the farm.
- Barry Bogle

Traffic was so bad in the area that Hamilton police and OPP were monitoring traffic and assisting with parking concerns.

"Police arrived and thank goodness they kind of helped out and put the massive traffic jam under control a little bit," said Bogle.

At around 2 p.m. the Bogles decided to shut things down.

"We decided that we just could not do this again for safety sake on the road and safety on the farm here. We had way too many people on our farm," Barry said.

"Everything went wrong. People were coming in, trespassing, knocking down our plants, stealing the heads. It was just chaos."

Barry says people from as far as New York and Dubai have visited his farm in the past and enjoyed talking about the flowers. He says various guests told them in some cultures sunflowers are good luck.

"Everything was fantastic for those eight days, but then as soon as Saturday came somehow everybody from Toronto found out about us and they just descended upon the farm," he said.

There were so many, Bogle says, that their website crashed. There were over 8,000 hits in one day. He said "Everybody knows about our farm I'm afraid."

Boggle says they've allowed photos before, about every three years, but doubts they'll ever do it again.

"I really doubt if we'll ever do this again because we don't want to get into a similar situation to this," the farmer said.

He says some people were even walking through poison ivy, ignoring the signs not to trespass.

​Sunflowers, Bogle says, are a crop that's very susceptible to different diseases and if someone goes through the crop and breaks a leaf off, that opens up an area on that plant where a disease can enter.

"We could lose our whole entire crop if people walk through the whole entire farm."

Boogle Seeds is still open for those looking to purchase their wild bird seed, but not for photos.
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sunflowers at Terre Bleu but need to pay an additional $10 on top of their regular $20 admission fee. there is no entry to sunflowers only . So in total, $30!

Sunflowers field only opened on weekends 🤨




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From Bogle the week before the hysteria...

Old poster inside barn:

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Calm before the storm:

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Mature sunflower & bee, backlit:

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wow! I really wish that I was able to make it out there before it shut down!

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