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  • Sep 11th, 2017 9:31 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Aug 30, 2017
4 posts

Sunset / Golden Hour

What is your best tips for settings / point of focus / subject placement / lens for the best golden hour portraits?
11 replies
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Jun 15, 2012
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There are many type of golden hour portraits (in order of sun angle) from sun flared, side-lit, front-lit, rim-lit, equal dynamic range etc.

Post examples of what you're after and we can reverse engineer how their done.
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Oct 5, 2004
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Rachikins wrote:
Sep 1st, 2017 9:44 am
What is your best tips for settings / point of focus / subject placement / lens for the best golden hour portraits?
There's no such thing. I am assuming you just bought a DSLR and have no idea what to do,since you wouldn't ask these questions otherwise.There's no magic, there's no perfect lens or focus or subject placement that works for every place and photo. And your question is as broad as "how do I take great photographs". :)
Go out and use your camera, eventually you will figure out what works best for YOU.
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[OP]
Newbie
Aug 30, 2017
4 posts
actually no...as a creative Im curious as to everyones creative take on it. What different photographers do that suits their DIFFERENT style. sharing unique tips and tricks since creativity ans photography is vague in that it can be subjected to am individuala style amd/or brand.

A point of conversation...I guess I worded it wrong for misinterpretation
Deal Addict
Aug 12, 2004
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Rachikins wrote:
Sep 4th, 2017 9:28 am
actually no...as a creative Im curious as to everyones creative take on it. What different photographers do that suits their DIFFERENT style. sharing unique tips and tricks since creativity ans photography is vague in that it can be subjected to am individuala style amd/or brand.

A point of conversation...I guess I worded it wrong for misinterpretation
Demi's comment still holds true. It's more about understanding light, there is no catch all tips or a lens that makes everything 'better', it's all based on what you are trying to do. You wouldn't be asking about settings or lens if you understand light. My telling you I shoot at Aperture of 2.8 with an 85mm lens with 1/800 shutter speed and ISO 200 at 5 minutes before dusk with the subject's back to the shot with daylight balance is not going to tell you what the shot will be or help you. It might be proper for that shot, but it will not be for yours. What if I'm shooting a silhouette? What if I'm trying to blow out the sky?
Jr. Member
Mar 16, 2011
163 posts
52 upvotes
One loose 'tip' is try not to have your subject face the setting sun directly. You will see that they end up squinting because of the sunlight.

Also try to incorporate some cool shadows in the environment around you (for example, a cool fence throwing shadows in the background or whatnot).
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 30, 2017
4 posts
and that is why Im curious about others go to creative output when it comes to a sunset shot.

well my attempt at a conversation and creative discussion starter turned into a questioning of my skill or knowledge..so thanks anyway
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 30, 2017
4 posts
thanks for respondinf in kind

for ex: your tip on adding cool tones. really neat addition.

i tend to be a minimalist when it comes to couple portraits with sunset, catching sun glare and allowing the warmth of the sun really to emit throughout
Newbie
Aug 11, 2004
96 posts
33 upvotes
Oakville
I clicked on this thread hoping to pick some good tips as well.. :(, thanks OP for trying. Maybe we can still have some ideas. I'm an amateur and I experiment with my camera any chance I get, I've recently been playing with sunset photography and using software to enhance my photographs. I found this article to be really interesting on HDR vs Multiple Exposure Blending.
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Feb 21, 2013
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Rachikins wrote:
Sep 6th, 2017 10:07 pm
and that is why Im curious about others go to creative output when it comes to a sunset shot.

well my attempt at a conversation and creative discussion starter turned into a questioning of my skill or knowledge..so thanks anyway
I actually appreciate that you posted this thread too, and I was hoping to find some basic tips as well. I know I can probably look things up online or find some books that go in depth, but I usually want to get a broad selection of styles/tips/techniques/etc and choose what works best for me.

Heck, even what some of you would consider basic - things like making sure your subject isn't facing the sun so they're not squinting - that's something I've made the mistake of doing before.
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Jun 15, 2012
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skarycat wrote:
Sep 7th, 2017 2:51 pm
I clicked on this thread hoping to pick some good tips as well..
Post a pic! I'm more than happy to try to decipher it.

While you can google general tips, there are no universal settings or subject placements, the phrase "golden hour portrait" is really broad, and can also get technical into simple or complex post processing.

For example, Lisa Holloway uses an expensive 200mm f/2, shoots 2 images of the same scene at different settings and Photoshops them together in a specific way. I've watched her editing vids and it's a cool way to beat the limits of single exposure dynamic range and rendition.

Or you can simply underexpose a couple at the beach to preserve the highlights using a decent camera to pull up shadows. Again, the settings will be specific to the lighting conditions.

Image

I mean look at this, creative use of reflector, gel and white balance, at 1:35 you can see it's golden hour, and even the general rule you might have read online about using cloudy WB doesn't apply here:



So we can't offer anything until we know the look you're after during that "golden hour", from the beginning when it's bright right into blue hour.
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Oct 5, 2004
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M1GOmigs wrote:
Sep 7th, 2017 3:14 pm
I actually appreciate that you posted this thread too, and I was hoping to find some basic tips as well. I know I can probably look things up online or find some books that go in depth, but I usually want to get a broad selection of styles/tips/techniques/etc and choose what works best for me.

Heck, even what some of you would consider basic - things like making sure your subject isn't facing the sun so they're not squinting - that's something I've made the mistake of doing before.
It's just the question is too broad to answer. I can shoot 100 times in different spots and come up with 100 completely different pictures/styles, different lenses and poses. A "not looking at the sun to avoid squinting" tip may for some or perhaps for some people or on some days and another day I would tell the subject to look at the sun to get a completely different look. It also applies to shooting at other times. It will depend on how low the sun is at that point or even where they are looking. They can look slightly away and not directly, to avoid squinting. The question was " the best tips for settings, lenses, subject placement" and there are really none because it's no different than shooting at other times. You can use any lens, you can place your subject literally anywhere and use any shutter speed, ISO and aperture.
Now, if the question was, " what lens do you use for portraits", or " how to avoid squinting during the golden hour", etc then there's at least something to work with.


Hopefully that makes more sense.
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