Food & Drink

Tartar sauce for fish chips

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 28th, 2017 5:01 pm
Deal Fanatic
May 2, 2009
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lecale wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 2:12 pm

Who puts Worcestershire sauce in tartar sauce? ;)
Me.

Hellmann's mayo, capers, green onion, fresh parsley, chopped Maille gherkins, dijon mustard, wooster sauce, lemon juice, dash of hot sauce. Sometimes a bit of chopped fresh tarragon, sometimes not. It is pretty thin but I like it that way.
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Aug 22, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 2:12 pm
You can use 1 Tbsp vinegar:1 yolk:~ 1 cup oil or you can use a blend of lemon juice and water for the vinegar (tones it down because it is more acidic than vinegar...you could untone that)
I don't know... I'd rather just use straight lemon or less of it than cutting with water.

Who puts Worcestershire sauce in tartar sauce? ;)
Why not? It adds a bit of something.
A lot of recipes have it in there.
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Nov 15, 2008
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:10 pm
Me.

Hellmann's mayo, capers, green onion, fresh parsley, chopped Maille gherkins, dijon mustard, wooster sauce, lemon juice, dash of hot sauce. Sometimes a bit of chopped fresh tarragon, sometimes not. It is pretty thin but I like it that way.
That sounds similar to Green Goddess dressing to me. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_goddess_dressing

Not the pickles/mustard, but everything else.
death_hawk wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:11 pm
I don't know... I'd rather just use straight lemon or less of it than cutting with water.
You need a certain amount of water to emulsify (that's how you fix "broken" mayo = put a bit of water in the bowl and slowly pour it all back in again...)
death_hawk wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:11 pm
Why not? It adds a bit of something.
A lot of recipes have it in there.
Sour tamarind and umami. My buddy thinks the solution to everything is Worcestershire sauce so I thought I would tease you too.

If I wanted an extra-rich tartar sauce I would a sieved hard boiled egg yolk to the prepared mayo. Gives some good colour, too.
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Aug 22, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:24 pm
You need a certain amount of water to emulsify (that's how you fix "broken" mayo = put a bit of water in the bowl and slowly pour it all back in again...)
Really?
I just fix it with more egg yolks. I've never heard it fixed with water.

Sour tamarind and umami. My buddy thinks the solution to everything is Worcestershire sauce so I thought I would tease you too.
It is! You're the odd one out.
Your friend is a genius.
Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes
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lecale wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:24 pm
That sounds similar to Green Goddess dressing to me.
When I make Green Goddess it's much greener, usually from watercress (I love watercress), also add anchovy paste and about 2/3 mayonnaise, 1/3 sour cream. chives, always tarragon, no capers, vinegar instead of lemon. Love Green Goddess either as a vegetable dip or on a wedge salad.
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Sep 2, 2008
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 1:59 pm
Who puts water in mayo?
Always need some water in mayo! Without it, one, it breaks easily when making it, and two...without its super chunky and kind of gross. Definitely need water to achieve hellmans consistency IMO.

Well it depends on your recipe I guess, but I typically use 3 yolks and a liter of oil. Whenever you see the mayo look a little oily and beads of "sweat" are glistening on the surface, a few drops of water smoothes everything out and makes it all play nicely. If you make it with just lemon juice its too acidic and without any water at all it has the consistency of scooping out tofu.

Also helps if you want to see how much mayo you can actually make from X amount of eggs! The limiting factor of how much oil you can succesfully emulsify into an egg ISN'T limited by the egg IMO..its limited by how much water (or water based liquid) there is. You can stretch it out real far but then of course it starts to taste like crap.

Anyway I guess there are tons of ways to make mayo, I had a coworker that liked to use 2 egg yolks and 2 whole eggs in his but I always thought that was kind of gross even though it all tasted the same at the end. Plus that actually makes sense because the water content in the white negates the need for more water. But still, eww.

But yeah any basic mayo IMO is just trying to replicate hellmans...its perfect. The only reason for doing it yourself is if you want to control the consistency for a certain application and because your chef tells you to.
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Nov 12, 2004
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Hometown
If you aren't into making mayo and like Miracle Whip as the base for tartar sauce do yourself a favor and get some Select homogenized dressing instead!!! Much stiffer consistency and a lot tangier than Miracle Whip.

Water in mayo... I would NEVER. LOL

Worst day in cooking class, was when the (chef of the day) student put in charge INSISTED we make the mayo for the dining room using melted butter instead of oil. Not GOOD. Soooo then he said maybe his chef at the Connie made it with un-melted butter. Now, that was entertaining watching him sputter in terror when that worked even less, till we all failed that lab. The more we suggested mayo is made with oil CHEF, the more he dug in his heels. The most important rule was the chef of he day was always right, so the entire class had to sink or swim on their talent level... The teaching instructor lost it when he clued in to why it was talking 3 people half an hour to make a gallon of mayo.

Thanks for the memories with this thread LOL.
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Nov 15, 2008
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:10 pm
Me.

Hellmann's mayo, capers, green onion, fresh parsley, chopped Maille gherkins, dijon mustard, wooster sauce, lemon juice, dash of hot sauce. Sometimes a bit of chopped fresh tarragon, sometimes not. It is pretty thin but I like it that way.
Gonna quote this again because now I say this sounds like sauce remoulade https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remoulade but with Worcestershire sauce instead of anchovy. Wooster really is the soy sauce of the west I guess.

That's fully loaded; that's for a real piece of fish not some minced pollock in batter lol
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Jun 29, 2010
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i'd never add water to tartar sauce myself. i just thin it out with malt vinegar which i use in place of lemon. i like my tartar sauce to be on the acidic side (commercial stuff is way too sweet for me on its own) plus the malt vinegar flavour is great with f&c imo...along with many of the folks in the uk.
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
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May 2, 2009
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lecale wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 4:58 pm
Gonna quote this again because now I say this sounds like sauce remoulade https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remoulade but with Worcestershire sauce instead of anchovy. Wooster really is the soy sauce of the west I guess.

That's fully loaded; that's for a real piece of fish not some minced pollock in batter lol
Lol! I love real fish.

Remoulade needs to be red from chili sauce and has horseradish in it. A good Crab Louis salad with spicy Remoulade is a favourite, as are fried oyster sandwichis.

I love this little appetizer with Remoulade. The molasses butter really makes it special.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... ast-232365
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 7:53 pm
Lol! I love real fish.

Remoulade needs to be red from chili sauce and has horseradish in it. A good Crab Louis salad with spicy Remoulade is a favourite, as are fried oyster sandwichis.

I love this little appetizer with Remoulade. The molasses butter really makes it special.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... ast-232365
I think the lobster in McLobster is technically in a remoulade, i.e., there are variations; think above is southern and your "tartar" is close to classic remoulade.

Horseradish is a nice touch - I've been using Lynch's Horseradish sauce as my fave horsey sauce/cocktail sauce because it's mostly horseradish but doesn't turn quickly like straight horseradish. https://lynchfoods.com/consumer/consumer-sauces/ There are coupons for it on save.ca too if you are cheapass like me. It has the least mayo of any horseradish-mayo substance I've encountered so it is pretty versatile and I have even plopped it in a drink.

Anyway if I were too lazy to mix up tartar sauce, I'd have Lynch's creamy horseradish sauce on fried fish.
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Aug 22, 2006
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slowtyper wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 11:52 pm
Always need some water in mayo! Without it, one, it breaks easily when making it, and two...without its super chunky and kind of gross. Definitely need water to achieve hellmans consistency IMO.
Really? I've never broken a mayo nor had it chunky and I've never added water.
Actually I did break it once but I was testing to see how far an egg yolk went.
FYI 1 yolk isn't enough for 1L of oil. It's close to 1L though.
Well it depends on your recipe I guess, but I typically use 3 yolks and a liter of oil. Whenever you see the mayo look a little oily and beads of "sweat" are glistening on the surface, a few drops of water smoothes everything out and makes it all play nicely. If you make it with just lemon juice its too acidic and without any water at all it has the consistency of scooping out tofu.
Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I've never had mayo come out that thick.
I'd love tofu consistency mayo so I could adjust it later.
Also helps if you want to see how much mayo you can actually make from X amount of eggs! The limiting factor of how much oil you can succesfully emulsify into an egg ISN'T limited by the egg IMO..its limited by how much water (or water based liquid) there is. You can stretch it out real far but then of course it starts to taste like crap.
Wait wait wait.
What?
Unless my theory is wrong, the egg (and mustard if you're using it) is providing the lecithin to bind the oil and water based liquids.
Now I kind of wonder if the binding power is so strong that one egg is enough to hold together like (let's say) 4L of oil as long as there's enough water to bind to.
Now I'm questioning if I've been doing it wrong.
I've never added water. But I've also never gotten ridiculously thick mayo.
Now I might go make a batch just to see.
But yeah any basic mayo IMO is just trying to replicate hellmans...its perfect. The only reason for doing it yourself is if you want to control the consistency for a certain application and because your chef tells you to.
I still like the taste of homemade over Hellmans.
Also Kraft > Hellmans in terms of taste if we're talking about commercial mayo.
Oh and if we're counting restaurants McChicken sauce > Kraft > Hellmans > Other mayo > "Salad Dressing" (aka miracle whip) > Mayo alternatives
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 12:09 am
Unless my theory is wrong, the egg (and mustard if you're using it) is providing the lecithin to bind the oil and water based liquids.
What you are actually doing is breaking the oil into tiny tiny beads that are separated by liquid (be it lemon juice and water or vinegar or similar)...the proteins in the egg yolk are just a stabilizer that helps keep these drops from recombining together again after it sits. Mustard acts like micro stones that help break larger oil droplets into smaller ones so it really only has action when you are whisking and not when the mayo is sitting.
Canuck2fan wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 3:46 pm
Worst day in cooking class, was when the (chef of the day) student put in charge INSISTED we make the mayo for the dining room using melted butter instead of oil.
Hollandaise?
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May 2, 2009
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lecale wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 8:23 pm
Horseradish is a nice touch - I've been using Lynch's Horseradish sauce as my fave horsey sauce/cocktail sauce because it's mostly horseradish but doesn't turn quickly like straight horseradish.
I just bought that sauce about a week ago after enjoying their mustard sauces, Crunchy and the other one. So good on a breaded chicken sandwiches!!

I like to mix horseradish with sour cream as a sauce for corned beef.

I just realized the Russian dressing I make for Reuben sandwiches is very similar to Remoulade.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/zing ... ich-recipe

No wonder we buy mayonnaise at Costco!! Lol!!
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Aug 22, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 12:30 am
What you are actually doing is breaking the oil into tiny tiny beads that are separated by liquid (be it lemon juice and water or vinegar or similar)...the proteins in the egg yolk are just a stabilizer that helps keep these drops from recombining together again after it sits. Mustard acts like micro stones that help break larger oil droplets into smaller ones so it really only has action when you are whisking and not when the mayo is sitting.
Sure, but the lecithin has something to do with it too. Otherwise the micro beads would just pool together because they're more attracted to themselves.
Also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayonnais ... properties
That's a FAR more complicated explanation than i was expecting.
AKA "I understood some of those words"

Also this is the first I'm hearing of mustard being more than anything but a bit of an emulsifier and a flavoring agent.

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