Food & Drink

Tartar sauce for fish chips

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 28th, 2017 5:01 pm
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Nov 15, 2008
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 1:15 am

I just bought that sauce about a week ago after enjoying their mustard sauces, Crunchy and the other one. So good on a breaded chicken sandwiches!!

I like to mix horseradish with sour cream as a sauce for corned beef.

I just realized the Russian dressing I make for Reuben sandwiches is very similar to Remoulade.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/zing ... ich-recipe

No wonder we buy mayonnaise at Costco!! Lol!!
Great ideas for summer. Thanks for the links and the recommendation.

I have to admit I have a thing for cooked mayo - you know those hot dog pizza buns with the squiggle of mayo instead of cheese you find in J-Town? When I was in Japan ordering a seafood pizza from Dominos it said on the menu that it you'd like a regular tomato sauce you have to ask, otherwise you're getting mayo. I like to grill chicken and pork in mayo and spices because it gives a yogurt-baked tandoori like effect but with Western flavours. I'll also add a scoop to a white sauce for e.g., seafood lasagne casserole or seafood stuffed phyllo type thing because the sauce will bake up as a solid then.
death_hawk wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 1:27 am
Sure, but the lecithin has something to do with it too. Otherwise the micro beads would just pool together because they're more attracted to themselves.
Also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayonnais ... properties
That's a FAR more complicated explanation than i was expecting.
AKA "I understood some of those words"

Also this is the first I'm hearing of mustard being more than anything but a bit of an emulsifier and a flavoring agent.
Well I am going by On Food And Cooking on the mustard. It helps break up the oil droplets but doesn't really keep a dressing stable. Something like xanthan gum or egg yolk truly stabilizes though - keeps the droplets from coalescing back together. Not so much a glue as a repellent.
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Aug 22, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 2:31 am
Well I am going by On Food And Cooking on the mustard. It helps break up the oil droplets but doesn't really keep a dressing stable. Something like xanthan gum or egg yolk truly stabilizes though - keeps the droplets from coalescing back together. Not so much a glue as a repellent.
I mean... real mayo shouldn't have xanthan gum in it, but it's obvious to what it does.
If you want to get technical, you can make mayo without egg yolks too. All you need to do is substitute in the lecithin.
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Sep 2, 2008
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If you want to go eggless for mayo I've made some amazing ones with chickpeas and chickpea liquid.
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I think the yolk adds a lot of flavour. Without it you just have a whole lotta oil and a dash of vinegar.
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lecale wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 12:30 am
Hollandaise?
Yeah it could be if you cook the egg yolk over heat which we not allowed to do, because the chef du jour of the class was LARGE and in CHARGE!!! He was going to show us mutts how things were done at the hotel he worked at.... Good plan if ONLY he had remembered the recipe right LOL

The whole point of the cooking labs for the restaurant at the school was to simulate real world conditions. So when it your was turn to be chef of the day you WERE in charge and everyone had to follow your instructions. Just like in the real world some students were good bosses some weren't.
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Canuck2fan wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 1:16 pm
Yeah it could be if you cook the egg yolk over heat which we not allowed to do, because the chef du jour of the class was LARGE and in CHARGE!!! He was going to show us mutts how things were done at the hotel he worked at.... Good plan if ONLY he had remembered the recipe right LOL
Well there are two ways you can make Hollandaise generally; one is to heat the egg and vinegar/lemon/water (but not cook it, because if it cooks it is ruined) and whisk in melted butter. Basically you are making mayonnaise over low heat.

The other way to make Hollandaise is to start with everything cold, put it in the pan, whisk away as you bring on the heat.

Another way is to put the egg/vinegar/etc. in a blender and drizzle in melted butter.

In all cases you need heat. Hollanadise = warm, saturated-fat mayonnaise.
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Aug 22, 2006
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I kind of wonder how mayonnaise would turn out with clarified butter.
You won't be able to hold it cold, but I wonder if it'd work for immediate service.
Maybe not 100% clarified butter since the texture would be weird, but maybe 50/50 oil/butter?
Still might be a disaster though.
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 4:19 pm
I kind of wonder how mayonnaise would turn out with clarified butter.
You won't be able to hold it cold, but I wonder if it'd work for immediate service.
Maybe not 100% clarified butter since the texture would be weird, but maybe 50/50 oil/butter?
Still might be a disaster though.
When doing Hollandaise you use twice as many yolks as you do for mayonnaise...e.g., Julia Child's ratios are, for one yolk, max 3/4 cup oil or 3/8 cup butter

I think the saturated fat would make you still have to use more yolk. I'm imagining some crazy unpleasant mouthfeel of congealing butter though.
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lecale wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 2:38 pm
Well there are two ways you can make Hollandaise generally; one is to heat the egg and vinegar/lemon/water (but not cook it, because if it cooks it is ruined) and whisk in melted butter. Basically you are making mayonnaise over low heat.

The other way to make Hollandaise is to start with everything cold, put it in the pan, whisk away as you bring on the heat.

Another way is to put the egg/vinegar/etc. in a blender and drizzle in melted butter.

In all cases you need heat. Hollanadise = warm, saturated-fat mayonnaise.
I guess I should have restated the part about we were supposed to making a gallon of MAYO, that was then going to be made into tartar sauce and a few other dressings for service....

Anyhow, the combination with clarified butter was just was so rich and thick it was basically inedible, we cut it with vinegar, lemon juice and even (I am embarrassed to admit) hot water. Tasting it you feel your arteries turning into nails you could pound through concrete.

Then when he insisted we were stupid and should probably have used un-melted butter, no one not even him would try it when we saw it. LOL I said, while on a positive note the cake batter base is ready or we could make some savory muffins...

The whole time people are suggesting, screaming and even pleading, with him that mayo is made with oil, but he was chef du jour and he was adamant he KNEW..... I keep looking for him on the food network cause he had the personality for it if not the talent LOL.
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Aug 22, 2006
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Speaking water and mayo, I think I actually remember there being a recipe in culinary school with it.
I remember reading it and was like WTF? Who puts water in mayo?
But who am I to argue. The chef was like "all the recipes are tested and working"
On top of that you were supposed to heat it on a bain marie too.
I couldn't figure out of I was making mayo or hollandaise.
The short of it is that it turned out exactly as I thought it would: A watery mess.
Ended up remaking it without water and it turned out fine.

I'll go dig up the recipe one of these days.
Canuck2fan wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 7:02 pm
I keep looking for him on the food network cause he had the personality for it if not the talent LOL.
Describes like half the people on that network.
There's some with some real talent but others are like WTF? Are you actually doing that?
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lecale wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 1:00 pm

I like the Kraft stuff better than Heinz but it is hard to find...maybe when the McDonald's/Kraft version comes out I will be in luck again.
Bought the Kraft Tartar Sauce yesterday at WalMart, back in stock right beside the Heinz.

Going to have a taste test, Heinz, Kraft, McDonalds and maybe PC. Might add Horne's if I can remember where I see it.
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 3:10 pm
Me.

Hellmann's mayo, capers, green onion, fresh parsley, chopped Maille gherkins, dijon mustard, wooster sauce, lemon juice, dash of hot sauce. Sometimes a bit of chopped fresh tarragon, sometimes not. It is pretty thin but I like it that way.
Was reading Serious Eats Tartar Sauce reviews, even though the brands are American.

Noticed their Tartar recipe is similar to the one I use.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/08/sauc ... ecipe.html
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2017 3:35 pm
Was reading Serious Eats Tartar Sauce reviews, even though the brands are American.

Noticed their Tartar recipe is similar to the one I use.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/08/sauc ... ecipe.html
"extra tangy" is right up my alley.
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
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May 2, 2009
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So I gathered up as many commercially made Tartar Sauces as I could find. And tasted them with the first of the season haddock and chips from a local chip-stand. Jessinick's in Sudbury, family-owned, fish is lightly breaded, perfectly fresh and portions extremely generous.

New favourite, Compliments, Sobeys/Foodland store brand. Lots of tang, a nice touch of dill, pickles are crunchy, texture is light and perfect. Kraft was the second favourite, maybe just because it is so familiar, being served at chip stands in those little packets. Bright and tangy but not sweet. McDonald's Filet-O-Fish, exactly like you get at McDonalds, perfect duplication. On the bland side for me. Heinz sauce, texture is good, it tasted more of pickling spice like cloves or cinnamon than pickles and on the sweet side, ingredient listed as "sweet pickle relish".

Great Value from WalMart had a nice texture, light and moussey but so sweet, sugar listed as an ingredient.

And, least favourite, I've bought this twice now and pitched both times, PC. It's bland and heavy and oily. I love PC products, often choosing them above name brands. This isn't to my taste.

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