Personal Finance

Taxes: Non-working spouse (no income)=claim as dependent?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 29th, 2009 10:01 pm
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2008
6858 posts
216 upvotes
Ontario

Taxes: Non-working spouse (no income)=claim as dependent?

A friend asked me this earlier today and I couldn't find a reliable answer.
10 replies
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2008
6858 posts
216 upvotes
Ontario
I share my Quicktax software with him and he said there is no option to add her under the "dependents" list. I just looked and you would have to list a spouse under "other".
When I check the "Who qualifies as a dependent?", it doesn't include a spouse, yet under live questions someone replied "yes".

Wouldn't the software automatically do tax saving tips if a spouse listed no income?
In general, for federal tax purposes, a dependent is someone dependent on you for support at any time in the year who is:
-your or your spouse or common-law partner's child or grandchild, or
-a resident of Canada at any time of the year who is your or spouse or common-law partner's parent, grandparent, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, newphew or neice.
Jr. Member
May 24, 2008
183 posts
Canada
you can't, not sure why you think they would qualify.
Jr. Member
Jul 6, 2007
104 posts
4 upvotes
mississauga
You can only claim one person as one or the other. Since they are your spouse you can only get a spousal credit. They aren't going to let you claim your spouse as both.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2008
6858 posts
216 upvotes
Ontario
eliteblaze2 wrote:
Mar 11th, 2009 9:15 am
you can't, not sure why you think they would qualify.
jcools wrote:
Mar 11th, 2009 10:01 am
You can only claim one person as one or the other. Since they are your spouse you can only get a spousal credit. They aren't going to let you claim your spouse as both.
That's what I thought. I think the "yes" response in the Quicktax live questions was referring to the spousal credit, not dependent (they're not really "live" questions, lol, just a history of questions asked online)
I'll let him know when I see him at work later.
Thanks
Moderator
User avatar
Aug 22, 2003
15539 posts
960 upvotes
Niagara Falls
I think you're (he) is confused due to using the term dependent. As others have said, he can claim the spouse's full personal exemption.
Thinking seriously about the 4 S's...Sun, Sand, Surf and ... Booked for Sept in Mexico and booked Samana DR for Jan!
Deal Fanatic
Feb 1, 2006
9099 posts
216 upvotes
When you select 'married' as your status in your tax software, and then put no income for the spouse, it automatically gives you the spousal credit. No need to specify it or claim it anywhere else.
Deal Addict
May 28, 2006
2290 posts
160 upvotes
Bullseye wrote:
Mar 15th, 2009 9:30 pm
When you select 'married' as your status in your tax software, and then put no income for the spouse, it automatically gives you the spousal credit. No need to specify it or claim it anywhere else.
I don't remember putting no income for spouse but I did check off married on the first page where you input your information. It does it automatically for you as Bullseye said. Got almost all my taxes refunded except for the Ontario health premium.
Jr. Member
Dec 5, 2004
150 posts
Toronto
What if I have a child and my spouse is not working, but we get like $1200 for CCB, do I entitle to claim the remaining unuse tax limit from my spouse?
Newbie
Jan 22, 2008
1 posts
Calgary, Canada
Line 303 - Spouse or common-law partner amount

If, at any time in the year, you supported your spouse or common-law partner and his or her net income was:

* less than $9,600, calculate your claim at line 303 of Schedule 1; or
* $9,600 or more, you cannot claim a spouse or common-law partner amount.

Make sure you enter the information concerning your spouse or common-law partner in the Identification area on page 1 of your return if you were married or living common-law on December 31, 2008. In certain situations, the net income of your spouse or common-law partner must be indicated even if your marital status has changed. See the section below called "Net income of your spouse or common-law partner".

source: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs ... u-eng.html
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