Personal Finance

TD customer service hits a new low

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 11th, 2019 9:38 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
1294 posts
1168 upvotes
Vancouver

TD customer service hits a new low

"A TD Bank customer says after several frustrating calls with a customer service representative, someone with the same name as the bank employee he spoke to posted a negative review of his business online."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ ... -1.5341579

Can't say I'm surprised. The training and quality control of customer service is abysmal these days. But one should always stay polite in a call to customer service, keeping in mind that clandestine payback is always a possibility if you are dealing with someone unprofessional. Even if the customer service rep seems like a complete bonehead, they may be doing their best to help within very restrictive guidelines and their own inability to understand the problem, and it won't be helpful to get upset with them personally.
11 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 9, 2003
24310 posts
1564 upvotes
Markham, ON
both parties are likely wrong.

CSR can hang up on ppl if they are being harassed ...i.e. swearing. Which likely he was doing being the call ended.
Sr. Member
Feb 1, 2018
882 posts
928 upvotes
Montréal
Wow, looks like I got away from TD just in time.

Customer's personal information being misused by bank employee... there's a data privacy commissioner investigation in this somewhere.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
1294 posts
1168 upvotes
Vancouver
thelefteyeguy wrote:
Nov 8th, 2019 10:53 am
CSR can hang up on ppl if they are being harassed ...i.e. swearing. Which likely he was doing being the call ended.
While I agree that's a necessary official policy, in practice a CSR should never hang up on a customer who happens to use a few swear words because they are legitimately upset about about an issue. That will leave the worst possible impression with the customer and cause maximum damage to the CSR's organization. If a CSR is that thin-skinned, they are in the wrong job, and should be quickly moved out to some other job for which they are better qualified. As someone further up the responsibility chain I have had to deal with angry customers who were often way off-base and unnecessarily abusive, and my only priority in dealing with them was to figure out how I can cool them off, fix the problem, and keep them as a satisfied customer for my company. I expected no less from anyone working on my team. Taking private revenge on a customer would be cause for instant dismissal.
Penalty Box
User avatar
Mar 10, 2018
2879 posts
216 upvotes
Scote64 wrote:
Nov 8th, 2019 10:46 am
"A TD Bank customer says after several frustrating calls with a customer service representative, someone with the same name as the bank employee he spoke to posted a negative review of his business online."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ ... -1.5341579

Can't say I'm surprised. The training and quality control of customer service is abysmal these days. But one should always stay polite in a call to customer service, keeping in mind that clandestine payback is always a possibility if you are dealing with someone unprofessional. Even if the customer service rep seems like a complete bonehead, they may be doing their best to help within very restrictive guidelines and their own inability to understand the problem, and it won't be helpful to get upset with them personally.
actually I am surprised. I know many people from Asian countries are not aware of policies here in Canada and Privacy policies.
But even same people who work with TD learn these and dont post stuff openly.
I know they discuss among us and I tell them please you need to stop disclosing details as it is wrong on many level.
But when they work at banks like TD they are polite and never go outside script and follow policy.
Hanging the phone is policy in insurance industry and people swear like no one can imagine. But they are warned not to do so with consequences.
I hope this guy gets fired. He will be retrained, reprimanded and given one more last chance before he is fired.
I dont care about Ethics, morals, rules or laws. I will apologies only when I get caught.
I try not to apologies but sometimes do it. not because its right thing but it benefits me.
Moderator
User avatar
Mar 23, 2004
38441 posts
4531 upvotes
Markham
imo the TD employee should be fired right away (coaching, wtf???), this kind of stuff (private info, conversations, etc) should never brought to the public. I wouldnt say the other person is completely right either with swearing, but it seems like the issue could have been fixed but just the CSR is incapable to for some reason. Well, and that he is dumb enough to post the review under his real name is umm...shocking too.
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
556 posts
211 upvotes
Terrible CSR. Brandon Grenier sounds like a real piece of work too. The world doesn't need people who behave like that either.
Scote64 wrote:
Nov 8th, 2019 10:46 am
"A TD Bank customer says after several frustrating calls with a customer service representative, someone with the same name as the bank employee he spoke to posted a negative review of his business online."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ ... -1.5341579

Can't say I'm surprised. The training and quality control of customer service is abysmal these days. But one should always stay polite in a call to customer service, keeping in mind that clandestine payback is always a possibility if you are dealing with someone unprofessional. Even if the customer service rep seems like a complete bonehead, they may be doing their best to help within very restrictive guidelines and their own inability to understand the problem, and it won't be helpful to get upset with them personally.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
1294 posts
1168 upvotes
Vancouver
The problem with interpreting "satisfaction" surveys like this is:

a) You don't know who they asked
b) You don't know what exactly they asked, or the context in which they asked
c) You don't know what the respondents meant - were they satisfied/dissatisfied with the bank's offerings, their convenience, their customer service?
Deal Fanatic
Dec 5, 2006
5156 posts
904 upvotes
Markham
Scote64 wrote:
The problem with interpreting "satisfaction" surveys like this is:

a) You don't know who they asked
b) You don't know what exactly they asked, or the context in which they asked
c) You don't know what the respondents meant - were they satisfied/dissatisfied with the bank's offerings, their convenience, their customer service?
If you(companies) want to know, its easy to know what questions and customers segments they asked. Its not a secret in banking industry

I'd say it's better than a CBC report
Sr. Member
May 16, 2017
739 posts
744 upvotes
Scote64 wrote:
Nov 8th, 2019 11:35 am
While I agree that's a necessary official policy, in practice a CSR should never hang up on a customer who happens to use a few swear words because they are legitimately upset about about an issue. That will leave the worst possible impression with the customer and cause maximum damage to the CSR's organization. If a CSR is that thin-skinned, they are in the wrong job, and should be quickly moved out to some other job for which they are better qualified. As someone further up the responsibility chain I have had to deal with angry customers who were often way off-base and unnecessarily abusive, and my only priority in dealing with them was to figure out how I can cool them off, fix the problem, and keep them as a satisfied customer for my company. I expected no less from anyone working on my team. Taking private revenge on a customer would be cause for instant dismissal.
The appropriate response of a CSR to such an incident is to tell the customer that while the frustration is understood and the issue will be recorded and escalate appropriately, the call will be terminated immediately if the abusive language continues - businesses that don't protect their employees from abuse are also subject to regulatory sanctions. It has nothing to do with "thin skin" - it has to do with both parties behaving as responsible adults.

Posting about a customer interaction by name is a definite privacy breach and should result in termination as it could result in legal charges against the employer.
Sr. Member
Nov 23, 2018
592 posts
511 upvotes
Some customers think they own the world, and some CSR don't know how to deal with customers that think they own the world.

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