Investing

TD e-Series funds Megathread (Post all your questions here)

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 7th, 2018 6:49 pm
Sr. Member
Feb 26, 2017
741 posts
334 upvotes
DefconZero wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 9:52 pm
No Intl?
I actually don't own any stocks or etfs that are outside of North America. It might not be a bad idea to take a look at the International Index (TDB911).
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Apr 16, 2009
1191 posts
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Vancouver
Chance7652 wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 10:25 pm
I actually don't own any stocks or etfs that are outside of North America. It might not be a bad idea to take a look at the International Index (TDB911).
Diversification is a huuuuugeeeee piece of having a well-balanced portfolio.
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Feb 1, 2012
839 posts
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Thunder Bay, ON
yellowlight18 wrote:
Jul 31st, 2017 6:50 pm
Seems to be getting worse...and what point would one suggest rebalancing to a less aggressive portfolio than the assertive portfolio?
yellowlight18 wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 8:26 pm

I am not trying to back out and sell just because the market is down and then buy back in again. I am concerned that I did not sell up my portfolio properly based on my age and level of personal risk and want to figure out if there more detail on how to set up a CPP based on age and risk.
If you look at the numbers I posted there are 2 large crashes in 2000 and 2008. Both were due to over exuberance in market sectors, tech in 2000 and mortgages and housing in 2008. Other than that I'd say the volatility is lower. Back before the data I posted markets were highly volatile.

Markets can get out of sync from fundamentals for a long time. It took decades to recover from the 1929 crash. The market peaked in the late 1960s and did not reach those levels again until the early 1980s. After the 2000 and 2008 crashes it took until (I'm guessing) 2011 or 2012 to recover to 2000 levels. (Those numbers are only for price return, not total return)

Bottom line is I believe if an investor has a target asset allocation for retirement, they should start gradually adjusting their allocation to the desired allocation starting 10 or 15 years before retiring. That's a conservative view but I have read a lot about investing history and seen a couple of crashes. There's a saying that the market can stay irrational longer than most people can stay solvent.

A good book is All About Asset Allocation by Rick Ferri. Also do a web search for Sequence of Return Risk.
Invest your time actively and your money passively.
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Jul 23, 2007
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yellowlight18 wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 8:26 pm
I am not trying to back out and sell just because the market is down and then buy back in again. I am concerned that I did not sell up my portfolio properly based on my age and level of personal risk and want to figure out if there more detail on how to set up a CPP based on age and risk.
Hi,

There's no one simple answer. Everyone has their own different risk tolerances. You'll soon find out if your portfolio is too risky the next time we hit a really bad market. I myself have been through three major down markets since the 80's. I was a bit worried at times, but not once did I feel the urge to panic and sell out. In fact I was doing the opposite and buying as the markets were going down with whatever spare cash I had available. Think of it as assets going on sale.

Canadian Couch Potato has a few pointers on setting up a portfolio here in this post from a few years ago.

Ready, Willing and Able to Take Risk
Newbie
Jan 23, 2017
80 posts
81 upvotes
Deepwater wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 11:57 pm
Bottom line is I believe if an investor has a target asset allocation for retirement, they should start gradually adjusting their allocation to the desired allocation starting 10 or 15 years before retiring. That's a conservative view but I have read a lot about investing history and seen a couple of crashes. There's a saying that the market can stay irrational longer than most people can stay solvent.
Given this scenario of 10-15 years prior to retirement, for the newbie investor what "target asset allocation" sample model would you recommend? Would it start at Retirement - 15 years and remain static? If not, how would the model change over time?
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Mar 20, 2004
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Mississauga
Quick question.
I already have TD RRSP + e-series opened.
Do I still need to go in branch if I want to open a non-registered MF account? And since I have e-series already, I can buy with this account too right?
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Feb 9, 2013
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Mississauga
wing0 wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 4:03 pm
Quick question.
I already have TD RRSP + e-series opened.
Do I still need to go in branch if I want to open a non-registered MF account? And since I have e-series already, I can buy with this account too right?
Yes, you'll need to go in the branch to open a non-registered mutual fund account. Then submit the form to switch to e-series.
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Mar 20, 2004
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jdu0ng wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 2:27 pm
Yes, you'll need to go in the branch to open a non-registered mutual fund account. Then submit the form to switch to e-series.
Thanks, so just to clarify, the e-series switch is per account and not on my entire profile at TD .
Newbie
Mar 13, 2015
22 posts
8 upvotes
North Vancouver, BC
I would like to get confirmed before I make a change if possible

Currently I have TFSA Saving account at People's Trust. I would like to make a switch the entire money to TD eseries.

Step 1) Open a new mutual fund account at TD
Step 2) Request conversion of the mutual fund account to e-series account
Step 3) Once it is converted e-series, ask TD to contact People Trust to transfer fund from People's Trust to TD e-series.

Am I missing anything? Thank you!
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Nov 28, 2010
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danpark13 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 2:57 am
I would like to get confirmed before I make a change if possible

Currently I have TFSA Saving account at People's Trust. I would like to make a switch the entire money to TD eseries.

Step 1) Open a new mutual fund account at TD
Step 2) Request conversion of the mutual fund account to e-series account
Step 3) Once it is converted e-series, ask TD to contact People Trust to transfer fund from People's Trust to TD e-series.

Am I missing anything? Thank you!
Sounds like you're all set. Just be wary of transfer fees from People's Trust and find out if TD will be willing to reimburse some or all of the fee. I know with TD Direct Investing usually they will reimburse the fee up to a certain amount if transferring a certain dollar amount or more but not sure for the mutual fund account
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Jan 20, 2016
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Houston, TX
imclumzy wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 9:24 am
Given this scenario of 10-15 years prior to retirement, for the newbie investor what "target asset allocation" sample model would you recommend? Would it start at Retirement - 15 years and remain static? If not, how would the model change over time?
You can take a look on Vanguard Target Retirement fund (e.g. 2035 - 18 years from now) to get a beacon on AA
https://personal.vanguard.com/us/funds/ ... IntExt=INT

Just get binds/stocks allocation from it and probably adjust Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Investor Shares 47.6% to e.g. 40% US total stocks and 6% Canada stocks or whatever (degree of home bias is another lengthy discussion)

P.s. there are a lot of debates on Boglehead forums about "proper" allocation for retirees. Some have 50% fixed, some 20%, some none counting social security and pension AS fixed income...
Personally I selected 2040 as my target fund with 15/85 AA for 401k and replicated it in RRSP with yearly or 5% band rebalance
Make the Trudeau drama teacher again!
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Jul 23, 2007
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endokuken wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 11:27 am
Just be wary of transfer fees from People's Trust and find out if TD will be willing to reimburse some or all of the fee.
I don't think there is any transfer fee from Peoples Trust to TD.

From the FAQ's at Peoples Trust.

11. Do you charge TFSA transfer fees?

Peoples Trust Company does not charge any fee to transfer TFSA’s to or from another Financial Institution.

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