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Teaching Jobs at YRDSB and TDSB

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 15th, 2017 3:18 pm
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 21, 2004
3740 posts
31 upvotes
Articuno wrote:
Sep 20th, 2017 5:18 pm
No french here lol... Is it still difficult to even get on the supply list? I'm not a teacher, just a student considering teaching and I remember looking at this thread earlier during my undergrad and people were struggling just to get on the supply list. Does science fair a little better? (my teachables would be general science, biology, chemistry and physics... I also have enough credits in phys ed. and social sciences that I could do ABQs but IDK if I'd wanna teach those subjects... kinda just wanna teach the sciences).

Also which school boards are best in terms of jobs... I know TDSB is shrinking but how is Halton or Upper Grand or even Peel? My fear is that I won't even get supply work after I graduate lol....... :(
The OCT publishes stats and it looks decent for you. The unemployment rate for your field and qualifications is about 16%. If you are a female teaching in those fields (or a minority), I'd suggest you have a pretty good shot to at least get supply in the first year.

Ontario College of Teachers 2017 Annual report - "Job outcomes for first-year English-language and French-language teachers resident in Ontario in 2016"

Image

The above is in the aggregate and doesn't account for someone in your situation who is likely well positions to find a position (at least supplying) in year 1 or 2.

My wife on the other hand finally (after a position offered at a school she volunteers at was lost to affirmative action that the TDSB required) is in the next round of interviews at the TDSB for occasional positions and graduated in 2011. We had given up and shes currently back in school to re-educate and shift careers but we will see where this goes. I have another friend who is a male who teaches primary divisions and was hired in year 1 (as supply but gets called every day in Halton) without volunteering which is a tough pill to swallow but understandable.
Newbie
Sep 11, 2016
7 posts
Thanks for the reply phomp. I'd be graduating in 2020 so hopefully the job market improves a bit more.

Sorry about your wife's situation, hope she gets the occasional position.
Newbie
Apr 22, 2013
25 posts
8 upvotes
TDSB is conducting interviews this week for Elementary and Secondary Teachers. Unfortunately they have re-instated the Eligible-to-Hire list that was removed a few years ago. They are now calling it The Elementary/Secondary Hiring Pool. They removed it due to regulation 274 but then realized that the regulation only applies to actual employed teachers so they brought it back under a different title. Being on this hiring pool list does not mean you are employed with TDSB. This is just a list of potential teachers that the Board can call on and move onto the actual Occassional Teaching Rosters when the need arises. You have to update your availability each week or else they will remove you. For those who pass the interview stage and get placed on this list do not pass on employment from other Schools or Boards as there have been teachers waiting for at least two years on this list. It's better to be working elsewhere and getting experience than waiting and hoping to get a call for placement on the TDSB Occasional Teacher's Roster. (A friend of mine interviewed and gave me this info). Here is an image of the form they hand out to potential teachers.
Images
  • TDSB.jpg
Last edited by RobinCastle71 on Oct 18th, 2017 11:42 am, edited 2 times in total.
Newbie
Oct 19, 2017
1 posts
Hi,

Sorry not sure if you still follow this I was just following up looking for help for YRDSB French proficiency test! I have heard it is composed of a written question, oral questions and a dictée; if you happen to remeber specific examples can you please let me know. I am hoping to practice in order to teach French but am quite worried!

Thank you!
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
890 posts
100 upvotes
Sorry for the late reply, but I only saw this post now. I'm qualified in Physics, Chem, Bio, Gen Sci. and Math and have had zero problems getting hired with different boards. That said, you should check to be sure that you'd really be qualified in each of those areas as it's exceedingly rare to have the number of credits you'd need to be qualified in each of these areas. In my one board their are 5 people out of ~15 000 with all of the qualifications you listed (not including Phys Ed. and social Sci) and in my second board there are 2 people out of ~1800 people. Unless they've somehow relaxed the qualifications in the past 4 years you generally need minor in the subject area to be qualified which means you would have had to have completed ~8 years of university to properly have the qualifications you listed.
Articuno wrote:
Sep 20th, 2017 5:18 pm
No french here lol... Is it still difficult to even get on the supply list? I'm not a teacher, just a student considering teaching and I remember looking at this thread earlier during my undergrad and people were struggling just to get on the supply list. Does science fair a little better? (my teachables would be general science, biology, chemistry and physics... I also have enough credits in phys ed. and social sciences that I could do ABQs but IDK if I'd wanna teach those subjects... kinda just wanna teach the sciences).

Also which school boards are best in terms of jobs... I know TDSB is shrinking but how is Halton or Upper Grand or even Peel? My fear is that I won't even get supply work after I graduate lol....... :(
Newbie
Sep 11, 2016
7 posts
Thanks, I appreciate your response. I'm probably gonna do gen sci and bio in teacher's college and then I would need 3 full year courses in any additional teachable and I already contacted universities making sure the courses I took would qualify me for chem and physics.

Are you currently supplying or have you gotten permanent full time? What year did you graduate and what school boards do you work in? Ignore any or all questions if you feel uncomfortable answering.

Thanks!
Clacker wrote:
Oct 21st, 2017 2:03 pm
Sorry for the late reply, but I only saw this post now. I'm qualified in Physics, Chem, Bio, Gen Sci. and Math and have had zero problems getting hired with different boards. That said, you should check to be sure that you'd really be qualified in each of those areas as it's exceedingly rare to have the number of credits you'd need to be qualified in each of these areas. In my one board their are 5 people out of ~15 000 with all of the qualifications you listed (not including Phys Ed. and social Sci) and in my second board there are 2 people out of ~1800 people. Unless they've somehow relaxed the qualifications in the past 4 years you generally need minor in the subject area to be qualified which means you would have had to have completed ~8 years of university to properly have the qualifications you listed.
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
890 posts
100 upvotes
Be careful, about what faculty of Ed's will tell you as they often change their story later when you're officially trying to sign-up for an AQ/ABQ, it's happened to several of my colleagues that they were told they had the qualifications for an AQ only to be told that they needed more university credits to actually enroll in the course. What is your undergrad degree actually in? I'll answer the rest in a PM.
Articuno wrote:
Oct 23rd, 2017 3:16 pm
Thanks, I appreciate your response. I'm probably gonna do gen sci and bio in teacher's college and then I would need 3 full year courses in any additional teachable and I already contacted universities making sure the courses I took would qualify me for chem and physics.

Are you currently supplying or have you gotten permanent full time? What year did you graduate and what school boards do you work in? Ignore any or all questions if you feel uncomfortable answering.

Thanks!
Newbie
Apr 10, 2017
63 posts
6 upvotes
East York, ON
Does having a masters plus b. ed make you more competitive in getting a placement ? or does experience only matter? also does the university that you get your b. ed matter? ie. is there a difference in getting it from york or UOIT?

Also, the first time I checked this thread, people were saying that it took 3-5 years to get a permanent position. A little while ago, people were saying that it takes 5-10 years? so how many years would it take now for a perm position? did the switch from a 1 year b. ed to 2 years make any difference?

Thanks a bunch for any answers!
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
890 posts
100 upvotes
2 Years is the absolute minimum to obtain a permanent position due to Reg 274. If you have in-demand teachables then you can get a contract (ie. permanent) in 2-3 years right now. If you don't have in-demand teachables you're still looking at ~5 years. The switch to 2 years has had an impact as there has been a lot of new hiring lately.

Would the masters be in something useful like maths or Sciences, or not useful like social sciences or education? Really all the masters does is bump you up on the pay-scale and has very little impact on your ability to land a permanent position.
zipperz wrote:
Oct 23rd, 2017 11:15 pm
Does having a masters plus b. ed make you more competitive in getting a placement ? or does experience only matter? also does the university that you get your b. ed matter? ie. is there a difference in getting it from york or UOIT?

Also, the first time I checked this thread, people were saying that it took 3-5 years to get a permanent position. A little while ago, people were saying that it takes 5-10 years? so how many years would it take now for a perm position? did the switch from a 1 year b. ed to 2 years make any difference?

Thanks a bunch for any answers!
Newbie
Apr 10, 2017
63 posts
6 upvotes
East York, ON
Clacker wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 12:35 am
2 Years is the absolute minimum to obtain a permanent position due to Reg 274. If you have in-demand teachables then you can get a contract (ie. permanent) in 2-3 years right now. If you don't have in-demand teachables you're still looking at ~5 years. The switch to 2 years has had an impact as there has been a lot of new hiring lately.

Would the masters be in something useful like maths or Sciences, or not useful like social sciences or education? Really all the masters does is bump you up on the pay-scale and has very little impact on your ability to land a permanent position.
what are some in-demand teachables? I'm currently studying economics and public policy, my econ is pretty much calculus and statistics based. Would I be in the in-demand or not in-demand group?

the masters would be in child education or business. I know two completely different subjects lol! but that's what I have interest in I guess.
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2010
890 posts
100 upvotes
In demand highest to lowest: French >> Math, Physics, Music, Tech > Chemistry, Business >>> All other teachables.

If you can manage a minor in math to go along with your business that would really help you. Stats doesn't count for much, but if you've truly learned calculus you'll be able to take on any senior Math.

Neither masters will make you more or less employable (assuming you already have business as a teachable), but will mean you start at Level 4 on the pay grid.
zipperz wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 1:13 am
what are some in-demand teachables? I'm currently studying economics and public policy, my econ is pretty much calculus and statistics based. Would I be in the in-demand or not in-demand group?

the masters would be in child education or business. I know two completely different subjects lol! but that's what I have interest in I guess.
Newbie
Apr 10, 2017
63 posts
6 upvotes
East York, ON
Clacker wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 4:45 pm
In demand highest to lowest: French >> Math, Physics, Music, Tech > Chemistry, Business >>> All other teachables.

If you can manage a minor in math to go along with your business that would really help you. Stats doesn't count for much, but if you've truly learned calculus you'll be able to take on any senior Math.

Neither masters will make you more or less employable (assuming you already have business as a teachable), but will mean you start at Level 4 on the pay grid.
This is really helpful. Thank you!
Newbie
Feb 27, 2017
5 posts
SilverRanger wrote:
Oct 30th, 2017 7:03 am
Are job prospects improving in the Peel board? (my teachables are bio/chem)

Peel just posted an opening (yesterday) for Secondary Occasional Teachers on Apply to Education:

"We are re-opening this posting only for applicants holding OCT qualifications in:

Business Studies - Information & Communication Technology; Computer Science; Computer Studies; Dance; Family Studies; French;
Technological Studies including:
Automotive; Transportation - Auto Body; Communication Technology; Construction; Cosmetology; Design Technology; Hairstyling & Aesthetics; Hospitality Services; Health Care; Computer Technology; Machine Shop; and Horticulture."

Overall, I have noticed an increase in hiring this school year, particularly in school boards just outside of the GTA (especially at the elementary level). I suspect that it is only a matter of time before school boards in the GTA (including Peel) will also need to start increasing their hiring.
Newbie
Dec 26, 2009
41 posts
5 upvotes
Newmarket
Are permanent teachers from pdsb able to apply to other school boards? I heard from some of my colleagues that there's a collective agreements from the union that it doesn't allow us to apply unless we are "relocating" and only to a "non-neighbouring region" i.e like Durham but not tdsb or yrdsb

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