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There is no such thing as 220V extension cord, right?

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  • Sep 13th, 2015 8:53 am
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Deal Expert
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Jun 14, 2003
23140 posts
173 upvotes

There is no such thing as 220V extension cord, right?

I wanted to stack the dryer on top of the washer but the 220V cord of the dryer is not long enough to reach the plug (about one foot from the floor).
I was told there is no such thing as 220V extension cord. Is that true? I just want to confirm that.

Also, if I need to create new 220V wall plug, I will have to lay a new electric wire from the box (in basement) to my laundry room (in the main floor), right? I just want to confirm that is the case. Of course, that will be done by certified electrician.

Does anyone have an estimate how much this job will cost me? Thanks.
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10 replies
Deal Guru
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Mar 25, 2003
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Markham
gman wrote:
Jan 24th, 2011 12:36 am
I wanted to stack the dryer on top of the washer but the 220V cord of the dryer is not long enough to reach the plug (about one foot from the floor).
I was told there is no such thing as 220V extension cord. Is that true? I just want to confirm that.

Also, if I need to create new 220V wall plug, I will have to lay a new electric wire from the box (in basement) to my laundry room (in the main floor), right? I just want to confirm that is the case. Of course, that will be done by certified electrician.

Does anyone have an estimate how much this job will cost me? Thanks.

maybe you can move the 220V Receptacle up a little?
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Sr. Member
Mar 17, 2010
600 posts
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behind your left sho…
Do they make a pre-made 220V extension cord? NO.

However.... You or a certified electrican can make one. Simply visit your local Home Hardware type store and they will sell you the proper grade (thickness) 220V wire, the female box and the male plug. Then, wire it up yourself. Or, get your electrican to wire it up.

If it was my home, I'd run a new 220V wire from your main panel to dryer location. And, ensure the new 220V box is located "above" any water discharge areas. 220V should laways be above water. If uncomfortable with 220V, do hire an electrician. You can pull the new wire in and they simply connect the ends (re: main panel and female box ends).

Also... Some old dryers take a 40 Amp breaker. The new electric dryers take 30 amp breaker. Also install a wire sized for the higher 40 Amp breaker. Then, either 30 Amp or 40 Amp breaker can be used.

Good luck...

.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
2477 posts
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Ottawa
The easiest, and probably cheapest, way to deal with this is to replace the cord on the dryer with one that is longer.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 22, 2007
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Mississauga
If you're a diy'er I agree but if a tech has to come to your home remove the back panel etc. then it wouldn't be the cheapest solution.
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Feb 3, 2005
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Georgetown
dirtmover wrote:
Jan 24th, 2011 9:05 am
The easiest, and probably cheapest, way to deal with this is to replace the cord on the dryer with one that is longer.

I went this route with my dryer (same situation - stacked units and the cord didn't quite reach... was tempted to move the location of the 220V receptable, but it was on a tiled wall - so it wouldn't have been simple drywall fixes after the fact). I found a cord at a US online site that would ship to Canada and bought a longer dryer cord. It seems in Canada the longest cord you will find is 6'... I believe it's a law/code requirement of some sort - to not have long 220V cords that might get damaged due to excess amounts of cord lying around.

I thought it would be "easy" to swap the cord on the dryer based on what I had read online, etc. And to be honest, it should have been! However, my particular dryer didn't use 'easy' connections (loop onto post connectors) and instead had "plug" connectors. The replacement cord had 'loop' connectors... so... I had a bit of fun cutting the ends off of the replacement cord and attaching plug connectors. If you check the back of your dryer and find that your cord attaches with the loop connectors, swapping the cord should be easy.
Sr. Member
Jul 26, 2010
827 posts
54 upvotes
eastern Ontario
Take the receptacle plug out of it's box and make it a junction box. Run a new piece of 10/2 wire from it to a new box in reach of the dryer and put the plug receptacle in that box. If new wire is below 5 feet cover it with a half round of plastic pipe for protection. You should get ESA permit ($71) and have it inspected. If you want to talk to your inspector first, let me know your location and I can point you to a pdf with inspector phone numbers in it
Newbie
Sep 8, 2015
1 posts
Montr
Hi Tiberius.
Read your reply...you mentioned an American website that ships to Canada. Can you please give me the link??/

Thanks.

Tiberius wrote:
Jan 24th, 2011 10:50 am
I went this route with my dryer (same situation - stacked units and the cord didn't quite reach... was tempted to move the location of the 220V receptable, but it was on a tiled wall - so it wouldn't have been simple drywall fixes after the fact). I found a cord at a US online site that would ship to Canada and bought a longer dryer cord. It seems in Canada the longest cord you will find is 6'... I believe it's a law/code requirement of some sort - to not have long 220V cords that might get damaged due to excess amounts of cord lying around.

I thought it would be "easy" to swap the cord on the dryer based on what I had read online, etc. And to be honest, it should have been! However, my particular dryer didn't use 'easy' connections (loop onto post connectors) and instead had "plug" connectors. The replacement cord had 'loop' connectors... so... I had a bit of fun cutting the ends off of the replacement cord and attaching plug connectors. If you check the back of your dryer and find that your cord attaches with the loop connectors, swapping the cord should be easy.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
6679 posts
350 upvotes
Toronto
Thread resurrection from 4 years ago. Nice.
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