Health & Wellness

There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 14th, 2019 11:28 pm
[OP]
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
14252 posts
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Here 'n There

There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

No kidding. About 1% of the population has celiac disease yet 1/3 of the population gravitates to gluten-free products thinking erroneously that they are better for them when they are actually worse, not to mention cost a lot more.
20 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
12551 posts
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City of Vancouver
eonibm wrote:
Sep 6th, 2019 5:37 pm
There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

No kidding. About 1% of the population has celiac disease yet 1/3 of the population gravitates to gluten-free products thinking erroneously that they are better for them when they are actually worse, not to mention cost a lot more.
'While one per cent of Canadians (350,000) have celiac disease — an immune response to eating gluten — and six per cent (2.1 million) gluten sensitivity, upwards of 20 per cent (more than 7 million) steer clear of the proteins as a lifestyle choice."

Why did u fail to mention the 2.1 million Canadians who are gluten sensitive? I put myself in that category. I can feel pain in my joints after eating pasta, for example. (It might not be the gluten in the pasta. Might be Roundup.) If the gluten is causing leaky gut, then I risk getting an autoimmune disease.
De gustibus non est disputandum
[OP]
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
14252 posts
4156 upvotes
Here 'n There
Becks wrote:
Sep 6th, 2019 8:28 pm
'While one per cent of Canadians (350,000) have celiac disease — an immune response to eating gluten — and six per cent (2.1 million) gluten sensitivity, upwards of 20 per cent (more than 7 million) steer clear of the proteins as a lifestyle choice."

Why did u fail to mention the 2.1 million Canadians who are gluten sensitive? I put myself in that category. I can feel pain in my joints after eating pasta, for example. (It might not be the gluten in the pasta. Might be Roundup.) If the gluten is causing leaky gut, then I risk getting an autoimmune disease.
6% still doesn't justify 1/3 going on the bandwagon. Sheesh!
Jr. Member
Jul 28, 2017
127 posts
232 upvotes
eonibm wrote:
Sep 6th, 2019 9:38 pm
6% still doesn't justify 1/3 going on the bandwagon. Sheesh!
Why does it matter to you what people want to eat?
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
2061 posts
1092 upvotes
Gluten sounds way too similar to 'glutton'.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
1981 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
We could save the earth by getting 90% of people to go breathetarian.
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
23358 posts
8985 upvotes
In other news... water is wet.
Full story at 11.

I actually don't mind the gluten free fad to be honest.
I'm not celiac, but for someone that is, it was impossible 10 years ago to eat out. Now there's gluten free everything with substitutes that don't 100% suck.
So people that actually are gluten sensitive can eat foods that are at least somewhat passable for the real thing that they never could eat before.

But hey... if you want to be pants on head stupid and avoid it for no reason, feel free to pay more for a worse product.

Also I'm kicking you out of my restaurant if you say you're allergic to gluten and I sanitize everything for you then you turn around and order that cake.
If you're trying to avoid it and say so, that's fine because cross contamination won't be an issue. I can make your food on the same equipment as everyone else.
But if I'm pulling my allergen kit when you're not allergic, now I'm angry.
Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2019
141 posts
55 upvotes
eonibm wrote:
Sep 6th, 2019 5:37 pm
There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

No kidding. About 1% of the population has celiac disease yet 1/3 of the population gravitates to gluten-free products thinking erroneously that they are better for them when they are actually worse, not to mention cost a lot more.
lol, good find. This article didn't popup on my apple feed.. Surprising.
Newbie
Nov 24, 2017
60 posts
11 upvotes
eonibm wrote:
Sep 6th, 2019 5:37 pm
There's no point in going gluten-free unless you have celiac disease, study suggests

No kidding. About 1% of the population has celiac disease yet 1/3 of the population gravitates to gluten-free products thinking erroneously that they are better for them when they are actually worse, not to mention cost a lot more.
I never understood the gluten free craze. You're much more likely to observe benefits from going lactose free, as lactose intolerance is much more common. Yet it's actually pretty hard to get lactose free foods when eating out for example. Wait staff often don't know if foods contain lactose, there are almost never lactose free desserts on the menu, grocery stores have lactose free milk but not lactose free ice-cream, etc. I've never had a problem with weight, probably because most junk foods have lactose. I either don't eat it (if I know), or it exits with velocity if I eat it by mistake.

(I'm lactose intolerant, so yes I'm biased. But 65% of the population is to some degree).

I do sympathize with those who genuinely have gluten sensitivities or allergies, but they seem to be only a small number of those adopting gluten free diets.
Sr. Member
Jun 9, 2015
737 posts
546 upvotes
Toronto, ON
opekoe wrote:
Sep 11th, 2019 8:52 am
I never understood the gluten free craze. You're much more likely to observe benefits from going lactose free, as lactose intolerance is much more common. Yet it's actually pretty hard to get lactose free foods when eating out for example. Wait staff often don't know if foods contain lactose, there are almost never lactose free desserts on the menu, grocery stores have lactose free milk but not lactose free ice-cream, etc. I've never had a problem with weight, probably because most junk foods have lactose. I either don't eat it (if I know), or it exits with velocity if I eat it by mistake.

(I'm lactose intolerant, so yes I'm biased. But 65% of the population is to some degree).

I do sympathize with those who genuinely have gluten sensitivities or allergies, but they seem to be only a small number of those adopting gluten free diets.
I just got diagnosed with Celiac so I'm slowly exploring the gluten free options at grocery stores.

In the past, I've had phases of being sensitive to lactose and used to drink almond or soy milk and looked for LF desserts at grocery stores. I'd argue that basically every grocery store carries So Delicious brand LF ice creams made with cashew milk or other LF milks. PC also carries LF ice creams made with coconut milk in a few varieties. I believe Ben and Jerry's also carries a couple Lactose free options.

This isn't to say that those with these dietary restrictions have it easy, but being a foodie (grew up in the restaurant business) that never suffered from any GI issues for 32 years randomly find out that I had celiac, man I'll take what I can get.

I went to whole foods the other day to see what GF options they had and they had a fairly big variety of So delicious Lactose Free ice creams... Probably 10+ flavours.
Newbie
Nov 24, 2017
60 posts
11 upvotes
The problem with lactose free products is that they're often lumped in with other dietary choices: e.g. vegan.

I am not a vegan. I don't want plant-based ice cream. I want real ice cream from a cow that had lactase added to cleave the lactose into its constituent sugars. Ditto for other lactose free products: I don't want dairy substitutes, I want dairy, but with the lactose pre-digested for me.
Lampsy wrote:
Sep 12th, 2019 12:59 am
I just got diagnosed with Celiac so I'm slowly exploring the gluten free options at grocery stores.

In the past, I've had phases of being sensitive to lactose and used to drink almond or soy milk and looked for LF desserts at grocery stores. I'd argue that basically every grocery store carries So Delicious brand LF ice creams made with cashew milk or other LF milks. PC also carries LF ice creams made with coconut milk in a few varieties. I believe Ben and Jerry's also carries a couple Lactose free options.

This isn't to say that those with these dietary restrictions have it easy, but being a foodie (grew up in the restaurant business) that never suffered from any GI issues for 32 years randomly find out that I had celiac, man I'll take what I can get.

I went to whole foods the other day to see what GF options they had and they had a fairly big variety of So delicious Lactose Free ice creams... Probably 10+ flavours.
Sr. Member
Jun 9, 2015
737 posts
546 upvotes
Toronto, ON
opekoe wrote:
Sep 13th, 2019 8:50 am
The problem with lactose free products is that they're often lumped in with other dietary choices: e.g. vegan.

I am not a vegan. I don't want plant-based ice cream. I want real ice cream from a cow that had lactase added to cleave the lactose into its constituent sugars. Ditto for other lactose free products: I don't want dairy substitutes, I want dairy, but with the lactose pre-digested for me.
Yeah I agree. Gluten free items get mixed in with organic stuff and becomes even more pricey than it would have to be.

Natrel has lactose free (real cream) ice cream. Have you tried that?
Newbie
Nov 24, 2017
60 posts
11 upvotes
Lampsy wrote:
Sep 13th, 2019 2:56 pm
Yeah I agree. Gluten free items get mixed in with organic stuff and becomes even more pricey than it would have to be.

Natrel has lactose free (real cream) ice cream. Have you tried that?
Hmm, I don't think so. I'll have to look for that next time. Thanks.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
1898 posts
941 upvotes
I didn't need a study to tell me that lol. It's hilarious the number of people who claim to be celiac but yet when their will power is weak and they go for gluten-laden foods they miraculously have no issues Face With Tears Of Joy

Western medicine is rather useless except for in emergency situations. This is because it's beholden to big-pharma which wants to keep people sick - it creates the disease and then cures the disease by attempting to address the symptom.

The root cause of most human problems start the emotional level, which left unaddressed manifests to a physical problem (allergies, disease, pain, etc.). Most people get upset by this, they refuse it because they rather blame someone or something else and then pop a pill rather than examine their life and how their mind (mental and emotional state) is largely the reason.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
1981 posts
717 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
I remember a survey done a few years ago that asked people about gluten. A fair proportion had no idea what it was but thought it was a good idea to avoid it.

There have been many hypotheses about what causes gluten allergy. Some say modern wheat has the inverse proportion of the two things that make up gluten over older varieties of wheat. Someone at Western Washington University claims that long fermentation bread making breaks down the gluten. None of these have been proven and it seems that there may be quite a few different gastro-intestinal illnesses all believed to be celiac disease.
hierophant wrote:
Sep 13th, 2019 5:42 pm
I didn't need a study to tell me that lol. It's hilarious the number of people who claim to be celiac but yet when their will power is weak and they go for gluten-laden foods they miraculously have no issues Face With Tears Of Joy

Western medicine is rather useless except for in emergency situations. This is because it's beholden to big-pharma which wants to keep people sick - it creates the disease and then cures the disease by attempting to address the symptom.

The root cause of most human problems start the emotional level, which left unaddressed manifests to a physical problem (allergies, disease, pain, etc.). Most people get upset by this, they refuse it because they rather blame someone or something else and then pop a pill rather than examine their life and how their mind (mental and emotional state) is largely the reason.
I wouldn't say that though I agree some people neglect their health and expect a pill to miraculously cure them. Some people do have genuine ailments (from genetic, environmental, infections factors among others). My wife's cousin (half cousin actually) suffers greatly from Crohn's (as does her brother to a slightly-lesser degree but their sister does not, at all). No pharmaceutical treatment, just surgery.
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