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Thinking of getting a caucasian Shepherd

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  • Dec 14th, 2016 12:26 pm
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[OP]
Banned
Nov 23, 2016
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Thinking of getting a caucasian Shepherd

SOLVED :) THANKYOU ALL! I appreciate the help MrsPotatoe and especially Karala for going overboard with your detailed message thats now knowledge of mine. :)
Last edited by goldbar on Dec 9th, 2016 12:10 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Apr 7, 2012
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Why do you want this very specific breed(s)?

Give me as an articulate answer as possible.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 23, 2009
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South of Ottawa
No, it is not "safe" buying a dog online and have it shipped.

Caucasian Shepherds are not easy to handle, if you are a new dog owner, move on to something else.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 11, 2006
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They look cool, I'm going to get one too. Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
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British Columbia
If you are even asking these questions the answer is likely no you should not get one (or a Doberman either). You need a lot of dog experience before getting dogs like this or you are setting yourself and the poor dog up for disaster.

What sort of dog experience do you have? Why do you want this breed and what does your daily routine look like incorporated with a dog?
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So eloquently said by Beachdown and K ...

If you're asking about these breeds on RFD, you already aren't ready. And/or don't know enough about them to be successful.
[OP]
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Nov 23, 2016
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SOLVED THANKYOU ALL :)
Last edited by goldbar on Dec 10th, 2016 12:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
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British Columbia
Just because you have a small dog does not mean you are prepared for a dog like this. What kid of dog is it? Is the smaller dog obedience trained? Do you let it get away with stuff because it is small, like jumping on people whenever it likes? How consistent are you AND the entire family with commands being taught and followed through on every single time the same way -- dogs need consistency to be trained.

Why do you need protection? If the dog is not trained correctly it can easily be useless in this aspect and/or downright dangerous. An excerpt from dogbreedinfo:
Unless properly socialized and trained, the Caucasian Shepherd may exhibit ferocious and unmanageable tendencies. It is very brave, alert, strong and hardy. It does not accept people it does not know and it has a powerful urge to defend. Everything and everyone who belongs to the family, including children, cats, other dogs, etc., will be regarded by this dog as part of "its" family and will be respected and protected. This dog should not be left alone with children, because if play becomes too rough, the Caucasian Ovtcharka my feel the need to protect your child, and may do it extensively. 

In short, its description is of warning that this is a dangerous dog if not handled correctly. This is absolutely not a first time larger dog to own.

Big or small, there are plenty of dogs that are good at giving warning barks if that is all you are looking for.

Most large dogs used for "protection" like this will need a lot of exercise. You have not answered what you plan to do with a dog in this regard, but a 15 minute walk around the neighbourhood daily does not cut it. Some dogs require up to 4 hours of exercise daily. That is like a part-time job in and of itself. You may have an out of control dog if not properly exercised. That means you should be ready to be with them running daily for an hour or more. A big house does not count. They will destroy that big house if you do not meet their daily physical and mental requirements.

My Australian Shepherd has redecorated the wallpaper and found may other fun activities on her own -- without actual off leash exercise for at minimum 30 minutes daily she clearly becomes a dog at loose ends. Today she was outside for 2 hours off leash running. She needs extended running sessions if she hasn't got it for whatever reason every few days. Sometimes we break up the exercises with an hour off leash before work, a walk in the neighbourhood during the day (someone is always home with her) and then after work another hour or more at a dog park. She also goes on several hikes in the summer months. These dogs need things to do.

Lots of dogs are trainable, I don't know much about this breed but in my quick few minutes of reading have found it may in fact NOT be that readily trainable. They may not be motivated by food and unless they see a reason for doing something may not do it.

Smart dogs mean they need something to do. They can be a lot of work - rain or snow they need something to do or they will FIND something to do.

Also get a dog from a breeder, do not look for the cheapest around. That in itself can be a fatal mistake... The cheapest can become the most expensive in health problems. Good breeders do health testing and breed dogs true to the breed temperment. Kijiji and the paper are bad places to get a dog. Those are only backyard breeders looking to make money fast.

Lastly, getting dog because it looks cool is the absolute last reason to get a dog. Too many people are getting high energy and/or potential agressive and high prey driven dogs just because of looks and then have no idea what to do with them.
Last edited by Karala on Dec 10th, 2016 7:45 am, edited 2 times in total.
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MrsPotato wrote:
Dec 9th, 2016 11:48 pm
So eloquently said by Beachdown and K ...

If you're asking about these breeds on RFD, you already aren't ready. And/or don't know enough about them to be successful.
Agreed. Also I would like to add that the most protective dog we ever had weighed 10 lbs. - he was a marvel and the smartest dog our vets had ever met. The size of a dog can mean nothing - our 10 lb. wonder scared Great Danes and Rottis.

I do hope that your 11 year old dog is in fact ready to be put down. I must say that you do sound somewhat anxious to adopt a new dog when your current dog is still alive. 11 years of age is generally not old for a small dog - a big dog it definitely can be.

I would also not be looking for the cheapest dog and would avoid the classifieds like the plaque. We have always let our dogs pick us and so far that has worked.
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Curious what your plan would be to train your dog for security?

The amount of specific training that's involved is unreal. Otherwise you'll have a "guard dog" that just barks and every little movement and is bored out its mind to the point it's destructive by ripping into drywall and sofas, and paces non stop (dobermans' for example).

This isn't the sort of training you'll be able to dial in by watching a few YouTube videos and reading a book.

Dogs aren't born just "doing" these "guarding" behaviours; they're taught over hours and years of work.
[OP]
Banned
Nov 23, 2016
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Thank you everyone for your replies it gave me lots of valuable information and i wasn't expecting to get this much help on this thread. To answer you guys question is i work at home so i have plenty of time to give the dog and myself lots of exercise through out each day of the week. If i was going to have a hard time training the dog i might take it to private training courses to teach it obedience and control. Once again thank-you MrsPotato and Karala for sharing your knowledge. I don't have any young children either so there isn't going to be any threat in my household. I am going to go to a legitmate breeder now with the fca papers etc.. it might cost me like $2500 but it will be well worth it that the dog is going to be very healthy through its life time. I could do 1 small walk and 1 big walk through each day so 15 minute walk and a 1 to 2 hour walk each day. Karala another thing i would like point out is there will be multiple people in my household who is going to help me teach and train the dog. So i am to a conclusion that i will be getting one but i won't be rushing it until maybe mid 2017. During that time i will do more research etc.. buy a mountain dog booklet. Thanks for everything!
Jr. Member
Oct 17, 2013
135 posts
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Ontario
I have a small farm and use livestock guardian dogs (3 maremmas) to protect my children and animals from predators. They live outdoors 24/7 on 10 fenced acres. The caucasian shepherd belongs to the LGD group of dog breeds and in my opinion, should only be raised in a rural settings. Too many LGD's end up in rescues or are put down because they were bought by people who didn't understand the needs of these kinds of dogs. They need a job, they want to be outdoors all the time in their own territory, they are very independent thinkers and no matter how much training you might do with them, in intense situations, they will not listen to you because they were bred to make decisions on their own. They use barking to warn off intruders, and this can be constant, even if you are around. Good breeders will clearly state that they will only sell to rural homes, otherwise, the risk is too high that an urban situation will not work out. Good luck in choosing the right breed.
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Apr 25, 2011
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British Columbia
earthygoat wrote:
Dec 11th, 2016 11:35 am
Good breeders will clearly state that they will only sell to rural homes, otherwise, the risk is too high that an urban situation will not work out. Good luck in choosing the right breed.
This is very true. A good breeder does not sell to you just because you can potentially exercise a dog, especially with a dog like this.

They will likely want proof you have owned similar breeds and that their dogs will be used for the purpose they have been selectively bred for. This is not because they are being overly picky and just don't want your money, but that they care about their dogs physical AND mental well-being. With these dogs they need to be extra careful.

These type of dogs are as I said absolutely not first time larger dogs to own and I would expand on that to say that they are not good dogs period if they are not in their correct environment. They aren't your typical dog.

Speaking of Maremmas, I know someone that knows someone with these dogs. The owner can't even exercise them properly because they cannot be around other people or animals. They don't have a large enough property and the dogs don't do well running beside a bike. The two dogs don't even get along with each other half the time. It is just a huge mess of bored, strong, prey driven to the MAX, totally unmanageable dangerous dogs. You couldn't pay me to deal with dogs like this in an indoor suburban setting.

Dogs come in a very wide variety of personalities that are markedly different based on breed. You need to be prepared and hopefully have been around such dogs in the past and spoken to a lot of owners of such dogs to get a good idea of what you're getting into. Ask breeders a lot of questions and make sure they are likewise asking you a lot of questions. You want this dog to be a good fit in your home.

Before my Aussie I had mostly dealt with Poodle mixes in my home and their personality is night and day besides that they are both extremely smart and motivated to please. One breeder I spoke with about daily exercise needs said they had sold to people in cities and they're fine. Great, I thought. When I asked further for clarification for what THEIR dogs do daily their answer was that they roamed their MASSIVE ranch all day long. I stopped asking questions. They were wanting to sell their dogs and didn't look at the difference between city and rural lifestyle. I needed to find a breeder that actually cared about such things; someone that took that difference seriously. Maybe those puppies would have been a good fit due to my commitment but I did not like their response. Eventually I got a dog from medium/low herding instinct lines to make living in the city easier. Despite this the exercise requirements and herding tendencies of an Aussie are occasionally a struggle to keep up with but I know you can't stop them from being what they were bred to be. Even though someone is always home it is somewhat irrelevant; my Aussie needs stuff to do frequently or quickly becomes a little monster. Moreso than any dog I have ever owned. I read and asked questions about the breed for a year before committing. A dog is for life, I wanted to make sure I could meet its needs.

There are many FAR more manageable larger dogs than the breed you are looking into... some dogs that may be designed for one thing, like herding or hunting, can potentially be incorporated into a more domestic life with the correct owners. I do not believe this is the case with a Caucasian Shepherd and I urge you to look to other breeds instead.
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Apr 11, 2006
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Mississauga
I still recommend a Bernese Mountain dog. I got mine as a first time dog owner, and they would certainly be a fine choice for first time big dog owners.

Highly trainable, super sweet and friendly; all very much a part of the breed. They do come with a lot of health risks, so it's important to find a quality breeder. But they are work dogs if you need to put them to work, however, they are just as happy hanging out with their human. They like to be where their human(s) are all the time.

Lower exercise requirements than say a golden or labrador retriever, german shepherds, huskies, and the like. But just as capable on long walks. Although, because they are considered a giant breed (as opposed to a large breed), and grow quite rapidly when young, it's important to not overwalk them either in their younger life as that can increase the chances of hip problems down the road (of course weight plays a big part as well).

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