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Ticketmaster's "Platinum Seats" - Another Form Of Scalping, All Over Again

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  • Feb 12th, 2012 2:39 am
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Deal Guru
Nov 16, 2004
11882 posts
555 upvotes
Toronto

Ticketmaster's "Platinum Seats" - Another Form Of Scalping, All Over Again

So recently I wanted to purchase tickets to see Bryan Adams here in Toronto. The tickets are selling out fast and my girlfriend and I were left debating what to do.
On the site for a bit, I noticed a tab that was advertising Ticketmaster's "Official Platinum Seats" ... I click on it to find the best seats we were looking for (lower rows in the stands, front rows on the floor) for a much higher price.

Example: $150 tickets are $229-249 in the "Platinum" section ...

What's the explanation? (From Ticketmaster's website)
Are Official Platinum Seats resale tickets?
No. Official Platinum Seats were not purchased initially and then posted for resale; they are being sold for the first time through Ticketmaster. Ticketmaster's Official Platinum Seats program enables market-based pricing (adjusting prices according to supply and demand) for live event tickets, similar to how airline tickets and hotel rooms are sold. The goal is to give the most passionate fans fair and safe access to the best tickets, while enabling artists and other people involved in staging live events to price tickets closer to their true value.


Excuse me?
So all of a sudden, some of the best seats to the best shows are held so that Ticketmaster can take in an even LARGER profit?
Whatever happen to "luck of the draw" and real fans waiting for the first 10 minutes of on-sale dates and purchasing tickets ...
Whatever happen to it being (in my imagination) "fair" so that fans would have a CHANCE at getting a decent ticket, rather than paying a scalper online or at the front door xxx amount of dollars over the original price?
Whatever happened to Ticketmaster just operating as a "fair" company?

I guess this helps offset the lack of reselling they can do on "TicketsNow" - 2009 Lawsuit

And for the record, those prices are much higher than what the rest of the internet is selling these tickets for.
Really, I'm just disgusted by this business practice, because it's praying on fans and their money and the want to attend the concert.
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Newbie
Dec 18, 2009
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Ticketmaster can get away with it cause they can. They really have NO competition at all, Live Nation could be considered competition but since they bought ticketmaster then theres nothing.

Ticketmaster has their small ticket sites that transfer profits to the mothership and gouge on BS fees. Unless theres competition of government regulation i don't see ticketmster changing anytime soon.
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Sep 3, 2006
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How is it scalping if they've never been sold?
[OP]
Deal Guru
Nov 16, 2004
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Toronto
jcon wrote:
Feb 8th, 2012 10:10 pm
How is it scalping if they've never been sold?

Mark-up on the regular price, selling above face value.
They've created a new face value.
They are also holding onto tickets for a concert that's basically sold out (at least those seats are) ... so, they are magicians as well!
"Deal of the Day" addict
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This is Canada afterall, now bend over and take it like a man. :confused:
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 12, 2005
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Victoria
From a business point of view it makes sense. The best seats at a concert around going for under 100 dollars, but can probably be flipped on ebay or a broker site for almost twice as much. Ticketmaster is trying to capture that value (rather then have it go to scalpers).

I had read about them doing this in the US a few months ago. From what I understood the artist can opt out (or not opt in?). I wonder if Bryan Adams knew about that?

On the postive side, here in Victoria, we have a smaller arena that doesn't get alot of good shows. The upside is that it doesn't use ticketmaster :)
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DaVibe wrote:
Feb 8th, 2012 11:18 pm
Mark-up on the regular price, selling above face value.
They've created a new face value.
They are also holding onto tickets for a concert that's basically sold out (at least those seats are) ... so, they are magicians as well!

Supply and demand.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Nov 16, 2004
11882 posts
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Toronto
jcon wrote:
Feb 9th, 2012 11:04 am
Supply and demand.

There's been supply and demand for 50 years of selling tickets, I just find the timing interesting about a year after they tried to profit off of tickets before and it didn't work out. Now there's this instead.

If you've never bought tickets from Ticketmaster before, this explanation might sound reasonable ... but if you've been buying tickets for years, then you feel like you're being cheated.

Solution: I'm probably going to avoid Ticketmaster altogether and just support scalpers and online sales. There's simply no reason to rely on them for tickets, other than you can use your credit card to pay and even that you can do online now.
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Jun 19, 2001
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drive to Kingston to see him, the $20 tickets are gone, $47 are no problem. Pretty sure he didn't sell out when he was here a couple years ago. Ticket savings will pay for the trip
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Deal Guru
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Nov 5, 2001
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Ticketmaster is eroding the business for the actual events/venues.

I used to go to 5-10 NHL games a year, 2-3 CFL games, 4-5 concerts, live plays or musicals, etc, etc.

Now I only go to a few events combined over the entire year. Part of the reason is the cost, but a major common factor is Ticketmaster! On principle, I refuse to buy tickets to an event thru Ticketmaster unless it is a second hand deal sold at under face value, a gift or prize, or a highly discounted rate.

The service and convenience charges are anything but. And charging me for the convenience of getting to print the tickets at my home? GTFO. I go to the nearest Ticketmaster outlet and make sure I waste 20-30 minutes of their time paying in loose change, asking stupid questions about the show or something like that...




Something will happen eventually to Ticketmaster. They have gotten too big and greedy to not be a target!
Sr. Member
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Mar 19, 2006
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Thankfully, my 2 favourite bands (Dave Matthews Band and Pearl Jam) have fan clubs through which they sell tickets. Ticketbastard averted.
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Apr 11, 2011
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blainehamilton wrote:
Feb 9th, 2012 12:32 pm
Ticketmaster is eroding the business for the actual events/venues.

I used to go to 5-10 NHL games a year, 2-3 CFL games, 4-5 concerts, live plays or musicals, etc, etc.

Now I only go to a few events combined over the entire year. Part of the reason is the cost, but a major common factor is Ticketmaster! On principle, I refuse to buy tickets to an event thru Ticketmaster unless it is a second hand deal sold at under face value, a gift or prize, or a highly discounted rate.

The service and convenience charges are anything but. And charging me for the convenience of getting to print the tickets at my home? GTFO. I go to the nearest Ticketmaster outlet and make sure I waste 20-30 minutes of their time paying in loose change, asking stupid questions about the show or something like that...




Something will happen eventually to Ticketmaster. They have gotten too big and greedy to not be a target!
Yeah same here, back in my younger university days I went to more concert and events, and now not so much. These fees keeps getting added year after year, it's so freakin' ridiculous.
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Feb 10, 2007
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It's funny you bring up the convenience fee. If you pay your parking tickets online, you get ding for a convenience fee too. :lol: :lol: :lol:
blainehamilton wrote:
Feb 9th, 2012 12:32 pm
Ticketmaster is eroding the business for the actual events/venues.

I used to go to 5-10 NHL games a year, 2-3 CFL games, 4-5 concerts, live plays or musicals, etc, etc.

Now I only go to a few events combined over the entire year. Part of the reason is the cost, but a major common factor is Ticketmaster! On principle, I refuse to buy tickets to an event thru Ticketmaster unless it is a second hand deal sold at under face value, a gift or prize, or a highly discounted rate.

The service and convenience charges are anything but. And charging me for the convenience of getting to print the tickets at my home? GTFO. I go to the nearest Ticketmaster outlet and make sure I waste 20-30 minutes of their time paying in loose change, asking stupid questions about the show or something like that...




Something will happen eventually to Ticketmaster. They have gotten too big and greedy to not be a target!
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Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2010
3320 posts
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Toronto
I really don't like all the BS fees, charges etc. either, but I don't really have a problem with this "Platinum Seats" thing. In fact, I think this is going to become more and more prevalent as venues start taking advantage of technology to push out scalpers. Same as with the Vancouver Olympics, where they had that officially-sanctioned resale site (with prices far above face value) where ticket holders could sell their tickets for a profit and VANOC would handle the back-end, reissue tickets to the purchaser, void the original tickets etc. I don't really see high ticket prices as a problem, if those seats are being filled. If Bob is willing to pay twice as much as Joe, I don't see why Bob shouldn't get the ticket, it isn't like there's a better way of determining who wants something more. In my opinion the problem with scalping is the risk of people being scammed, being sold fake tickets etc and spending a lot of money for nothing, which tarnishes the event. It's probably a good thing when the organizers take this in-house so that at least someone who pays through the nose knows that they are going to get what they paid for.
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