Food & Drink

Tim Hortons Sandwiches!!

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 24th, 2013 11:56 am
Tags:
None
Deal Expert
May 17, 2008
15134 posts
152 upvotes
death_hawk wrote:
Jan 1st, 2013 5:20 pm
I'll give you the point for Tim's having to bring in soup. I was more making a general point to the 99% of other "restaurants" that bring in their soup. Then again... I'd still be making it from scratch even if I had very few or no existing ingredients.
For any restaurant that wants to have consistency across outlets, they really can't just make stuff up based on what is around. Going out to buy stuff to make a soup from scratch is more expensive and time consuming than just buying these prepared soups, which doesn't work for restaurants that want to keep prices low.

Prepared soups are also made with lower quality stuff that is mostly left over after the more desirable stuff is used for other purposes, so it pretty much is what you are talking about, but outsourced.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
15485 posts
3362 upvotes
(Speaking strictly about restaurants since a coffee shop doesn't have on hand ingredients)
While I'll somewhat agree based on consistency across the chain, Soup is an ever changing item that doesn't really require consistency in terms of availability. Personally I like seeing unique soups instead of the standard 12 or whatever everyone serves.
And even if you don't have a unique soup, there's no reason you can't have a consistent recipe across the chain.
Then again... some chains DO bring everything in prepared and heat it up. Sadly... this is what's passing for food nowadays.

Prepared soup isn't cheap. It's about $3/L (probably a bit cheaper if you buy in a Volume that a nationwide chain has) or $0.75 per 8oz portion.
Even without on hand ingredients I can make it for much cheaper than that.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 9, 2004
21622 posts
257 upvotes
Mississauga
death_hawk wrote:
Jan 1st, 2013 6:49 pm
(Speaking strictly about restaurants since a coffee shop doesn't have on hand ingredients)
While I'll somewhat agree based on consistency across the chain, Soup is an ever changing item that doesn't really require consistency in terms of availability. Personally I like seeing unique soups instead of the standard 12 or whatever everyone serves.
And even if you don't have a unique soup, there's no reason you can't have a consistent recipe across the chain.
Then again... some chains DO bring everything in prepared and heat it up. Sadly... this is what's passing for food nowadays.

Prepared soup isn't cheap. It's about $3/L (probably a bit cheaper if you buy in a Volume that a nationwide chain has) or $0.75 per 8oz portion.
Even without on hand ingredients I can make it for much cheaper than that.
You're forgetting that TH is a preparer of food, they don't really have chefs/cooks at each location. Like Subway, It's just an assembly line more or less of low skilled staff. Not to be confused with an actual restaurant in any way.
Thanks for the memories, RFD.
Good-bye.
Deal Expert
May 17, 2008
15134 posts
152 upvotes
death_hawk wrote:
Jan 1st, 2013 6:49 pm
(Speaking strictly about restaurants since a coffee shop doesn't have on hand ingredients)
While I'll somewhat agree based on consistency across the chain, Soup is an ever changing item that doesn't really require consistency in terms of availability. Personally I like seeing unique soups instead of the standard 12 or whatever everyone serves.
And even if you don't have a unique soup, there's no reason you can't have a consistent recipe across the chain.
Then again... some chains DO bring everything in prepared and heat it up. Sadly... this is what's passing for food nowadays.

Prepared soup isn't cheap. It's about $3/L (probably a bit cheaper if you buy in a Volume that a nationwide chain has) or $0.75 per 8oz portion.
Even without on hand ingredients I can make it for much cheaper than that.
Prepared food is pretty much always going to cost more than just buying the ingredients to make it yourself, but that is only part of the picture. The biggest expense for these restaurants is labor and training. Tim Hortons(and many other restaurants) pay significantly more for their supplies to bring in mostly prepared foods, in order to minimize labor and training costs. Their model relies on being able to plug in pretty much any able bodied human being so they can pay them minimum wage and not worry if they stay or leave. This is instead of having to find qualified chefs, train them to make Tims food properly, and then pay them enough so that they don't leave.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
15485 posts
3362 upvotes
Ok both of you, go back and read the first line of my post.

But yeah, I know how chains operate. That's why I rarely go there. And every time I do go it's usually terrible.
Newbie
Oct 15, 2012
86 posts
8 upvotes
Tim's chili comes into the store in a "chili concentrate" plastic bag. All you do is add water and warm er up.
If buying food product in this fashion is to ensure consistency across the chain, why does it taste so different from location to location. Lately,(the past year) it's been absolutely awful. I think Tim's needs to rewire many things.
Sr. Member
Aug 12, 2012
500 posts
66 upvotes
Richmond Hill
dickblack07 wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2013 4:12 pm
Tim's chili comes into the store in a "chili concentrate" plastic bag. All you do is add water and warm er up.
If buying food product in this fashion is to ensure consistency across the chain, why does it taste so different from location to location. Lately,(the past year) it's been absolutely awful. I think Tim's needs to rewire many things.
Things like adding the right amount of water, and turning the 'temp' knob to the correct temperateure are very difficult tasks for some people. Not everyone can make a good old fashioned bag of chili.
Deal Expert
May 17, 2008
15134 posts
152 upvotes
death_hawk wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2013 1:38 am
Ok both of you, go back and read the first line of my post.

But yeah, I know how chains operate. That's why I rarely go there. And every time I do go it's usually terrible.
I know what you said, but your post applies to places like Tims as well as other restaurants.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 5, 2011
2304 posts
185 upvotes
YF
didn't know the sandwiches are gone... but i never liked them anyway. Chicken or egg salad are the best and cheapest.

The soup/chili they don't come from powder, but individual bags of frozen concentrate, they heat them up and mix with water.

they are actually not that bad.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 1, 2008
712 posts
16 upvotes
i only eat their chicken salad sandwich as it's the cheapest sandwich on their menu. all the other ones, for the price they are charging i might as well go somewhere else to eat.

as for soup, i think only the chicken noodle is good. i remember seeing something on rfd some time ago where somebody said that chicken noodle was the only soup that wasnt a powder/mix. not sure if that's true or not
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 10, 2006
2484 posts
53 upvotes
just had their veggie cheese panini, its sucked(little flavour and I could have made a better one). I miss their veggie sandwich.
"Truth is High, Higher Still is Truthful Living" Guru Nanak
× < >

Top