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  • Oct 11th, 2017 1:54 pm
Deal Addict
Apr 28, 2004
1695 posts
269 upvotes
Toronto
Mindy82 wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 2:29 pm
They are toddlers ffs. Why screw up their eyesight now? It's not necessary.
There is hardly any clinical evidence that tablets or smartphones affect long-term eyesight in children or adults, and it isn't because of a lack of trying. Dozens and dozens of studies have tried to link electronic devices to poor vision, but time and again the main determinant is heredity. Even the more common problem of eye strain from focusing at close visual ranges (playing on a tablet, READING A BOOK, staring at a chessboard/gameboard, etc.) are temporary and can be recovered just by looking away. True myopia (nearsightedness) is affected much, much more by the parents' genes than any external factor. So stop screwing up your toddler with a false myths not based on facts and messing up their brain...It's not necessary!
Macx2mommy wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 12:37 pm
Based on what our paediatrician and optimistrist advised us, the back light on tablets and laptops aren't great for kids (adults too). It does put a stain on their eyes and the backlight impacts sleep patterns. My kids are avid readers, and use their laptops to download books that cannot easier get in paper copy. Both the dr and the optimistrist recommended getting a proper ereader, as they don't have the same lighting and it is better for their eyes and sleep. I don't know how much is safe or not, but there are studies that do show this information too. We are extremely careful with or kids eyes because due to genetics (not computer use) they may have lots of problems in the future.
All electronic devices emit blue light (shorter wavelength and more energy) that is both good and bad. But the greatest exposure to blue light by far is, well, being in sunlight (ie PLAYING OUTSIDE.) While blue light is known to boost alertness and help memory/cognitive functions (and possibly elevate mood), the main concern is how it affects the circadian rhythm. Watching television or reading a tablet late at night affects that cycle and could cause sleeplessness or fatigue.
Cas77 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 3:29 pm
My sister and her husband are both optometrists (sister is also part-time university professor) and are both quite adamant that it does affect a child's eye sight. My niece did not watch TV until she was 5. Now the problem was every time she went to a restaurant with a TV playing she would be completely fixated on it and not pay attention to people around her or to her food.
I would like to hear their reasoning. Facts don't support their suspicion (at least not any clinical studies provide clear evidence) that eyesight is permanently affected by electronic devices. Behaviourly, has it really changed a child's social interactivity? My teen-aged nieces and my daughter grew up on electronic devices and while it can be argued that they were "socially-challenged" in their early years, they're not-stop chatterbugs now. Even my 8 year old son connected with his younger cousins at a wedding recently. Having never met some of them before, they all "bonded" over some stupid ipad game and having a great time all night.

As far as I'm concerned, electronic devices are just another tool in the toolbox.
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2015
980 posts
366 upvotes
akira1971 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 4:39 pm
There is hardly any clinical evidence that tablets or smartphones affect long-term eyesight in children or adults, and it isn't because of a lack of trying. Dozens and dozens of studies have tried to link electronic devices to poor vision, but time and again the main determinant is heredity. Even the more common problem of eye strain from focusing at close visual ranges (playing on a tablet, READING A BOOK, staring at a chessboard/gameboard, etc.) are temporary and can be recovered just by looking away. True myopia (nearsightedness) is affected much, much more by the parents' genes than any external factor. So stop screwing up your toddler with a false myths not based on facts and messing up their brain...It's not necessary!



All electronic devices emit blue light (shorter wavelength and more energy) that is both good and bad. But the greatest exposure to blue light by far is, well, being in sunlight (ie PLAYING OUTSIDE.) While blue light is known to boost alertness and help memory/cognitive functions (and possibly elevate mood), the main concern is how it affects the circadian rhythm. Watching television or reading a tablet late at night affects that cycle and could cause sleeplessness or fatigue.



I would like to hear their reasoning. Facts don't support their suspicion (at least not any clinical studies provide clear evidence) that eyesight is permanently affected by electronic devices. Behaviourly, has it really changed a child's social interactivity? My teen-aged nieces and my daughter grew up on electronic devices and while it can be argued that they were "socially-challenged" in their early years, they're not-stop chatterbugs now. Even my 8 year old son connected with his younger cousins at a wedding recently. Having never met some of them before, they all "bonded" over some stupid ipad game and having a great time all night.

As far as I'm concerned, electronic devices are just another tool in the toolbox.
The challenge with studies is the information can be interpreted in a multitude of ways. For every study that shows one things, there is another that refutes. What the heck is a parent or anyone to do. For me, I base it on sources that I trust. In my case it is a well known and respected optimistrist who specializes in children's eye health and a well know pedatrician. They keep up to date on areas, and I trust them to interpret the information along with what I have read.

In terms of behaviour, there are know studies that have technology has an impact on kids. In fact educational shows like Sesame Street have changed their cycle times on images to three times faster becuase kids are being wired differently. Research is finding kids are having a shorter attension span than previous. There are psychologists that are finding that kids do need to detox from screen time because they are starting to develop aniexty being seperated from screens. There are equivalent to detox groups for teens to break addiction to technology.

Does this mean every child will become addicted or have a problem? I do think so, but I think in this relatively new realm parents do need to show some caution as they don't know neccessarily what to look for 'as everyone else is doing it'. I am definitely not a doom and gloom and my kids use a lot of tech as a tool. I also see where it can become a problem as parent don't recognize the signs. I will admit, when I find my kids 'off' and we can't figure out why, we will take a break from all tech. It often does help, and my kids aren't even on that much.

Another example I share is that my very introverted child asked if she could listen to music on her phone to block out things kids were saying on the bus. It wasn't bad, just about some really scary shows tha other kids were watching, but she didn't like hearing it. I let her do it. Also when she was stressed out from school or something she would ask if she could play some mindless games for a short time, maybe thirty to forty five minutes. We said sure. She was getting more and more anxious about things and just not happy. We brought her to a counsellor, it was through the counsellor and a psychologist tha specializes with Tweens and technology that helped her talk through what I see as fairly minor things with big feelings. I learned that she was starting to loose some of her coping mechanism and turning to the technology as an escape. This is really common for many kids, teens and adults. As result, small things become big because they get distracted with technology until they bubble up and become overwhelming. My point to sharing this, is just for parents to be aware, each child is different, and there are negatives to to technology that many of us have not had to think about. On the flip side, my child is also an avid reader, and she uses books as an escape. O see that too and have to limit her reading time. Too much of anything can be bad.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Newbie
Jun 23, 2016
28 posts
9 upvotes
akira1971 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2017 4:39 pm
There is hardly any clinical evidence that tablets or smartphones affect long-term eyesight in children or adults, and it isn't because of a lack of trying. Dozens and dozens of studies have tried to link electronic devices to poor vision, but time and again the main determinant is heredity. Even the more common problem of eye strain from focusing at close visual ranges (playing on a tablet, READING A BOOK, staring at a chessboard/gameboard, etc.) are temporary and can be recovered just by looking away. True myopia (nearsightedness) is affected much, much more by the parents' genes than any external factor. So stop screwing up your toddler with a false myths not based on facts and messing up their brain...It's not necessary!

The symptoms of digital eye strain are usually temporary, but long-term exposure to blue light can be quite serious. Dr. Jeff Taylor, of The Ophthalmology Group, LLP in Paducah, Ky., says, “Prolonged exposure to blue light can actually contribute to photochemical damage, which can potentially harm your retinal cells and make you susceptible to conditions like age-related macular degeneration.” The age group that is the most at-risk is children. Dr. Taylor points out that children are still learning self-control and self-monitoring. Playing apps and games and surfing the internet is fun, and most children lack the self-control to create limits for themselves. “I encourage parents to talk with their kids about setting limits for screen time,” Dr. Taylor shared. “Sometimes, the best way to enforce those limits is for the parents to model good behavior for the children.”

I don't need to wait for the study thanks. It's common sense. It's not good.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 19, 2010
1552 posts
418 upvotes
Sudbury
kanewtz wrote:
Sep 9th, 2017 1:41 pm
Before I get into this...please do not come into this thread telling me my 4 year old doesn't deserve/need an iPad. That isn't the point of this thread.

My son's 4th bday is coming up in the beginning of October (he starts school next week as well). As of lately, he has taken a keen interest to my iPad.

He likes to do spelling games/math games on it and quite frankly I am impressed as to his progress.

He can add numbers and tell me for example (1+5=6) etc..spell his name correctly and count to 100 in both french and english...do the alphabet in french and english, etc.

This being said, we are pretty dead set on getting him his own iPad for his bday. It will come in handy for when we travel (airports. airplanes, etc so he has stuff to watch).

I'm torn between the iPad mini 4 - 32gb or the iPad Gen 5 - 32gb...both are the same price (~$399)...I am thinking the mini is better sized for him?

Pro's of iPad Gen 5 - Better processor, newer, bigger screen
Pro's of iPad Mini - Laminated display, anti-reflective coating, smaller screen (same resolution so better image).

For those of you that have got your toddler an iPad...which did you go with? Looking for some insight here.

Thanks!
As mentioned in bold above...this topic is getting off hand.

My toddler got an iPAD....he loves it...he's happy. /end thread.

You can start a new topic if you wish to discuss the adverse effects of screens on Toddler's eye's, etc.

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