Computers & Electronics

Too many password to remember ....

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 6th, 2018 3:18 pm
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Jan 16, 2011
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speedyforme wrote:
Dec 5th, 2018 7:36 am
I am too finding it more difficult because some passwords require upper and lower + number but now some ask for special characters but some won't let you.

Also some places only you you enter 6 digits while other ask for minimum 8.
Stopl00king@me
thUNDERstruc8!
Br1tnay$pear$

Nothing is fool proof but at least you can remember some.... LOL.
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Dec 11, 2008
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kr0zet wrote:
Dec 5th, 2018 8:21 am
Stopl00king@me
thUNDERstruc8!
Br1tnay$pear$

Nothing is fool proof but at least you can remember some.... LOL.
I think I am going to try the lyric thing for sure...
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Even though it doesn't look like OP is interested in a password manager, BitWarden is a good free one. Open source, has had its code recently audited, and pretty easy to use.

And for other password generating methods, there's also dice ware but that doesn't work for everything with strict requirements
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Jun 4, 2007
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kr0zet wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 7:53 pm
Read an interesting article recently, we are making passwords that are easier for computers to guess and harder for humans to remember.
https://xkcd.com/936/ - My coworker used to bring this up every time password strength came up for discussion.
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I aimed to use common passwords as much as possible. I used to have a simple string of 6 lower case letters.

abcdef

Then, I needed upper case letters, and numbers. Ok, new password.

Abcdef1

That still works for some sites, but others need more characters. Ok, new password.

Abcdef12

That still works for some sites, but others need more characters, and some symbols. Ok, new password.

!Abcdefghijklm1

As a result of these ever evolving requirements, I now have quite a few passwords go guess, when I try to log into a site I have not used in a while. Pretty annoying.

The ironic thing is, that my online banking password is "less complex" than those required for automotive message boards....

PS, none of the above are my actual passwords. They are simply illustrative.
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kr0zet wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 7:53 pm
Read an interesting article recently, we are making passwords that are easier for computers to guess and harder for humans to remember. 8 random characters using lower/upper case and special characters? Taking less and less time for computers to brute force. How about a 21 character password you can remember??? Hitmewithyourbestsh0t Researchers are saying that a song lyric with a mixed in number is easier to remember and the longer passwords are harder to crack for computers.

Password - Howsecureismypassword.org
TakeMyBreathAway1 - 2 trillion years to crack
Shout,Shout,letitallout - 3 Septillion years to crack
Icantdrive55 - 2 thousand years to crack
YouvebeenThunderstruck - 45 Quintillion Years to crack
Hitmebaby1moretime - 145 Trillion Years to crack

I use this theory to set my passwords now and have no problem remembering them.
Well, now you just gave away everybody's password and we're just scrambling to change them now.

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Jul 23, 2007
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MynameisjesusI'mgoingtowin
58 SEPTILLION YEARS to crack
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Dec 13, 2009
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I have all of account logins and passwords in an Excel spreadsheet. The spreadsheet itself is password protected. So, anytime I cannot recall a password, i simply open up the spreadsheet and good-to-go. As others have suggested, a strong master password for your master list might be a good idea. You can always write that password on a piece of paper in a book somewhere for backup in case of human-memory-failure. As long as you remember where the piece of paper is tucked away.
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dainja wrote:
Dec 6th, 2018 8:31 am
Http://www.Dashlane.com is my favourite password manager (and it’s Canadian)
I don't think Dashlane is Canadian. You could be mistaking them for 1Password.
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Jun 11, 2010
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Innova101 wrote:
Dec 6th, 2018 8:11 am
I have all of account logins and passwords in an Excel spreadsheet. The spreadsheet itself is password protected. So, anytime I cannot recall a password, i simply open up the spreadsheet and good-to-go. As others have suggested, a strong master password for your master list might be a good idea. You can always write that password on a piece of paper in a book somewhere for backup in case of human-memory-failure. As long as you remember where the piece of paper is tucked away.
This is fairly risky considering it's easy to crack spreadsheet passwords. The only way I would ever do this is if I had it only stored on an encrypted USB drive.
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Sep 13, 2011
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ANJOU
barqers wrote:
Dec 6th, 2018 2:56 pm
This is fairly risky considering it's easy to crack spreadsheet passwords. The only way I would ever do this is if I had it only stored on an encrypted USB drive.
that why I have a rar notepad with my password in it. But I don't write them down completly. For example, if the password is Concombre4! (cucumber in french) I will note C***4!.
All my password are a vegetable starting with a capital Letters I only use a first letter once. So if someone crack my rar file and get access to the notepad inside, he will not not how to fill the blank.

You may use the same technique with other category of words...

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