Sports & Recreation

The Toronto Blue Jays/MLB Thread

  • Last Updated:
  • May 26th, 2017 7:19 pm
Newbie
Jan 18, 2016
75 posts
6 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
kenchau wrote:
May 19th, 2017 10:15 am
It's not just having two feet in the box. The hitter doesn't even get to leave the box after every pitch - only under certain circumstances. Once they are deemed in the ready position, which is a judgement based on them being in their stance with arms up and bat ready to go, and looking up at the pitcher and not moving - they are ready.

Also, it's not like the pitcher can just quickly toss the ball across the plate. They still have to go through the motions with a set position pause, before they wind up and throw and they can only start all the motions after the hitter has been set. The only difference between a quick pitch and a normal one, is the wind up is less exaggerated and leg kick is near non-existent, and the pause is not as long.

Finally, the pitcher can't even start those motions until the batter is set. It's not like the pitcher is winding up before the batter is set, and by the time they finish, the ball leaves their hands just after the batter is set. That's not what's happening. Whether they wait 1 second versus 5 seconds after the batter is ready, is a moot point - both are legal.

It's like driving and Stop signs. Some people seem to think there is a 3 second rule, but there isn't. The vehicle just has to be completely stopped for an instance. You can choose to wait for three seconds, but it doesn't mean the person stopping for 1 second is breaking the rule. So if you think of a quick pitch as the 1 second stop versus conventional pitch, which is the 3 second stop, that's the difference.
Nope, a quick pitch has nothing to do with the pitcher's timing. It has only to do with the batter being in the box, ready and aware. The batter does not 'come set' I don't know where you get that, most guys are always moving in the box. But awareness or readiness is a judgement call to be sure.

Stroman does a thing where he pauses in mid-delivery on one leg for the sole purpose of messing up a batters timing, Johnny Cueto does something similar. What Motte did was the same in that he altered his normal delivery to bring the pitch to the plate more quickly, this is not a quick pitch as defined however which is why Pillar quickly changed his tune after the game (unless you happen to be sceptical of his apology and believe he did it solely to mitigate the suspension he had coming).
Deal Addict
Apr 11, 2006
4287 posts
703 upvotes
Mississauga
twowood wrote:
May 19th, 2017 10:50 am
Nope, a quick pitch has nothing to do with the pitcher's timing. It has only to do with the batter being in the box, ready and aware. The batter does not 'come set' I don't know where you get that, most guys are always moving in the box. But awareness or readiness is a judgement call to be sure.

Stroman does a thing where he pauses in mid-delivery on one leg for the sole purpose of messing up a batters timing, Johnny Cueto does something similar. What Motte did was the same in that he altered his normal delivery to bring the pitch to the plate more quickly, this is not a quick pitch as defined however which is why Pillar quickly changed his tune after the game (unless you happen to be sceptical of his apology and believe he did it solely to mitigate the suspension he had coming).
When I say "quick pitch" I'm not using the term as defined in the MLB rules, which is how they define an illegal pitch made when the batter is not yet ready. I'm merely stating it as a relativity to a more conventionally timed pitching motion. If you read back, I already said, Pillar had no basis to complain as he was clearly set, before the pitch was made - everything was fine with that pitch.

And yes, of course a quick pitch has to do with the pitcher's timing. They are using an abbreviated leg kick and are not waiting as long before they start their wind up motion. That set pause is also quicker.

Furthermore, when a batter is set, they are no longer moving their feet and changing their stance and body elevation. They've already gotten into the crouched position and really, it's just their arms moving, and they might have a slight body sway (like Edwin does sometimes). But they're looking at the pitcher - they are set. That is what set means and that's how an umpire judges. Obviously, "not moving" is not to be taken literally.
Sr. Member
Jun 13, 2010
981 posts
51 upvotes
Ogata wrote:
May 18th, 2017 8:22 pm
Ceciliani on the dl haahhah who do you call up now..
The Blue Jays have called up outfield prospect Anthony Alford from the Fisher Cats. He is ranked 34th on Baseball America’s top prospect list. Dwight Smith Jr or Anthony Alford for the outfield today.
Sr. Member
Jun 13, 2010
981 posts
51 upvotes
Ogata wrote:
May 18th, 2017 8:22 pm
Ceciliani on the dl haahhah who do you call up now..
The Blue Jays have called up outfield prospect Anthony Alford from the Fisher Cats. He is ranked 34th on Baseball America’s top prospect list. Dwight Smith Jr and/or Anthony Alford for the outfield today.
Newbie
Jan 18, 2016
75 posts
6 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
kenchau wrote:
May 19th, 2017 11:02 am
When I say "quick pitch" I'm not using the term as defined in the MLB rules, which is how they define an illegal pitch made when the batter is not yet ready. I'm merely stating it as a relativity to a more conventionally timed pitching motion. If you read back, I already said, Pillar had no basis to complain as he was clearly set, before the pitch was made - everything was fine with that pitch.

And yes, of course a quick pitch has to do with the pitcher's timing. They are using an abbreviated leg kick and are not waiting as long before they start their wind up motion. That set pause is also quicker.

Furthermore, when a batter is set, they are no longer moving their feet and changing their stance and body elevation. They've already gotten into the crouched position and really, it's just their arms moving, and they might have a slight body sway (like Edwin does sometimes). But they're looking at the pitcher - they are set. That is what set means and that's how an umpire judges. Obviously, "not moving" is not to be taken literally.
fair enough. My point is that the term "quick pitch" and phrase quick pitch are often confused (for obvious reasons). The fact that a "quick pitch" as defined in the rules is a dangerous act while the act of pitching quickly is a form of gamesmanship to generate a legitimate advantage can muddy the waters unintentionally.
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2005
3776 posts
253 upvotes
Cox is seriously comparing Goins to Tulo
I don't do downvotes.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 20, 2006
6626 posts
853 upvotes
Ajax
blexann wrote:
May 19th, 2017 5:26 pm
Cox is seriously comparing Goins to Tulo
Yes, heard that. Defensively equal. Offensively absolutely not.
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