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Locked: Travelling while on EI

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Moderator
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Sep 21, 2004
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pepsi_vs_coke wrote:
May 15th, 2011 11:05 pm


should i just pretend never receive the letter from them and see what happen?


Please help

If you don't respond (which happened most of the time), you are assumed guilty and will be subjected to a penalty (I think the maximum is 50% of the overpayment). Just be honest, be apologetic, and repay the EI benefits that you aren't entitled to in the first place.
Member
Jul 29, 2009
201 posts
2 upvotes
Wilmega wrote:
May 16th, 2011 6:39 pm
I would call the 1800 number and make sure they got your letter. You don't want to unecessarily pay interest if you don't have too. If you're still currently on a claim they will deduct a portion of your EI payments to recover the overpayment.

I just assumed it took awhile for them to investigate and get back to you. I will give them a call this week.
Member
Jul 29, 2009
201 posts
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b166er1337 wrote:
May 16th, 2011 8:54 pm
If you don't respond (which happened most of the time), you are assumed guilty and will be subjected to a penalty (I think the maximum is 50% of the overpayment). Just be honest, be apologetic, and repay the EI benefits that you aren't entitled to in the first place.

It syas right on the letter if you do not reply you will be assumed guilty
Deal Addict
May 28, 2005
2080 posts
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craigsol wrote:
May 16th, 2011 9:51 pm
I just assumed it took awhile for them to investigate and get back to you. I will give them a call this week.

Sometimes - but I've had clients call who recieve a notice of debt several months after the fact with interest already adding up. You just want to make sure everything is on the up and up - letters can be easily mishandled - lost - misplaced or whatever the case is.
Jr. Member
Jul 3, 2011
143 posts
35 upvotes
Canada
What I find interesting about the rule of being in Canada while collecting EI is that you can leave Ontario to spend a week in British Columbia without doing any job searching and there's no penalty, but just go over the border to NY or PA and do some job searching in person for a few days and you lose pay for each day away. Not much sense in that.
Sr. Member
Jun 21, 2006
524 posts
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Timewaster wrote:
Jul 6th, 2011 1:10 am
What I find interesting about the rule of being in Canada while collecting EI is that you can leave Ontario to spend a week in British Columbia without doing any job searching and there's no penalty, but just go over the border to NY or PA and do some job searching in person for a few days and you lose pay for each day away. Not much sense in that.

Why should the Canadian government pay you to try and find jobs elsewhere? They want you to work in Canada (BC or Ontario, either way still paying Canadian taxes).
If you move to the US and work there, all your tax money will go to the US. Seems more than reasonable to me for them not to pay the EI for those days...
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Jan 11, 2008
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GTA
Timewaster wrote:
Jul 6th, 2011 1:10 am
What I find interesting about the rule of being in Canada while collecting EI is that you can leave Ontario to spend a week in British Columbia without doing any job searching and there's no penalty, but just go over the border to NY or PA and do some job searching in person for a few days and you lose pay for each day away. Not much sense in that.

That's not true - if you are doing a job search/attending an interview and can prove it.

Now, most people that "just go over the border" are not conducting a job search. For most people this wouldn't be practical anyways as many (most) would not easily be able to work in the U.S. anyways.

http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/ei/t ... html#while

Am I allowed to leave Canada while receiving regular benefits?

Usually, you are not eligible to receive regular benefits while you are away from Canada. However, you can receive regular benefits if you show that you are available for work in Canada while abroad and you inform your local Service Canada Centre that you will be away temporarily.

You can be outside Canada for a period of seven consecutive days for the purpose of:

* attending the funeral of a member of your immediate family or a close relative;
* accompanying a member of your immediate family to a medical facility, provided that the treatment sought is not readily available in the family member’s area of residence in Canada;
* visiting a member of your immediate family who is seriously ill or injured; or
* attending a bona fide job interview.

You can be away from Canada for a period of 14 consecutive days for the purpose of conducting a bona fide job search.

If you indicate that you have taken measures to be reached if an employment opportunity presents itself during your absence and that you are able to return to Canada within 48 hours, we will accept that you have proven your availability.
Newbie
Mar 26, 2008
58 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto
1LuckyGuy wrote:
Jul 6th, 2011 1:36 am
Why should the Canadian government pay you to try and find jobs elsewhere? They want you to work in Canada (BC or Ontario, either way still paying Canadian taxes).
If you move to the US and work there, all your tax money will go to the US. Seems more than reasonable to me for them not to pay the EI for those days...
Because its called EI. And the government isnt paying you anything, they are giving you your money back, read your paystub next time.
Jr. Member
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Aug 1, 2008
113 posts
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if i'm on ei and leave to the state for a day on the weekend, should i tell them before i leave or when i return? Do i have to?

Should i answer yes or no to :
available to work M-F and if i was outside of Canada.
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Jun 26, 2011
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shopmenow wrote:
Jul 6th, 2011 6:00 pm
Because its called EI. And the government isnt paying you anything, they are giving you your money back, read your paystub next time.
Unless you contribute 55% of your earnings to EI, the government is giving you more than your money back.
swallow_046 wrote:
Jul 7th, 2011 2:01 pm
if i'm on ei and leave to the state for a day on the weekend, should i tell them before i leave or when i return? Do i have to?

Should i answer yes or no to :
available to work M-F and if i was outside of Canada.
As answered previously, they don't seem to care that you're gone for the weekend as long as you're able to work M-F.
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Sep 21, 2004
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Calgary
swallow_046 wrote:
Jul 7th, 2011 2:01 pm
if i'm on ei and leave to the state for a day on the weekend, should i tell them before i leave or when i return? Do i have to?

Should i answer yes or no to :
available to work M-F and if i was outside of Canada.

If you are absent in Canada on the weekend, it won't affect your benefits. EI benefit is payable on a weekday basis.

Just give the call centre a quick call after you came back.
Deal Addict
Jul 15, 2009
1556 posts
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What if you are out of the country before you start receiving benefits, during the two-week waiting period?

What if you are out of the country while you are still receiving severance pay, and therefore haven't started receiving benefits yet? Do you even have to be filing reports during this period?

What if you get laid off in the middle of your vacation? Yes, it does happen.

Does ServiceCanada have any information on these scenarios?
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Sep 21, 2004
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bubak wrote:
Jul 27th, 2011 7:37 pm
What if you are out of the country before you start receiving benefits, during the two-week waiting period?
Doesn't matter. You have to be available and willing to work in order to serve the waiting period. In other words, if you are out of Canada (unavailable), then no waiting period is served.
bubak wrote:
Jul 27th, 2011 7:37 pm
What if you are out of the country while you are still receiving severance pay, and therefore haven't started receiving benefits yet? Do you even have to be filing reports during this period?
If you are in receipt of separation monies, you can do whatever you want and it won't affect your EI since nothing is payable to you anyway.
bubak wrote:
Jul 27th, 2011 7:37 pm
What if you get laid off in the middle of your vacation? Yes, it does happen.
Well then, it depends where your vacation is. If you are within Canada, then technically you can start your EI right away. If you are outside, you can still establish your claim, but you won't be able to serve the waiting period until you return.
bubak wrote:
Jul 27th, 2011 7:37 pm
Does ServiceCanada have any information on these scenarios?
yes.
Member
Apr 22, 2005
340 posts
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Kitchener
just to add a friend left the country for about a month. once EI found out he had to pay back the money for the time he was gone. they will find out.
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May 6, 2006
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Stumbled upon this thread and am hoping for some advice.

My spouse went on a medical leave of absence from work due to severe stress and depression (diagnosed by her family doctor). Prior to diagnosis, we had booked our ANNUAL trip to visit family in Europe. A month later (after booking our trip), she went on medical leave and filed for EI (under medical/illness - supported by her doctor).

The Government found out she left the country while collecting EI and they sent a letter requesting she respond to a series of questions (why did you leave the country, for what purpose, why didn't you say anything, etc).

The problem with the current EI reporting system is that it is tailored completely for those who file for EI after being laid-off or fired -- not for medical reasons. If you are sick or not well, you shouldn't be 'looking for work' so leaving the country is meaningless. She took that trip as an opportunity to seek reprieve from the stress of her job and, with the help of family, hopefully overcome her depression. Her doctor even recommended she do this!

Anyone have experience with this sort of situation? We are putting a letter together now (along with printed records of ticket purchase date, etc, proving the ticket was booked well before she ever filed for EI). She thought she only had to report if she left the country if she was laid-off or fired (not medical reasons).

If anyone has advice, it would be greatly appreciated

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