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Trees and shrubs for new development

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  • Jul 12th, 2018 5:18 pm
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Jr. Member
Jul 14, 2009
130 posts
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Richmond Hill

Trees and shrubs for new development

We've just moved to a new development as got our lawn in last week. We're looking to start planting and we're undecided on what plants to use and what trees to select. What grows well, rapid and is suitable for new construction yards?
18 replies
Member
Nov 17, 2014
497 posts
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Ontario
How large is your lot? Assuming a typical small suburban lot and you would like some privacy?
Newbie
Mar 6, 2011
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Ajax, ON
How much sun does the area where you are planting receive?
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 16, 2008
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Maple
Don't plant them too near to the house.
Sr. Member
Feb 4, 2010
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I wouldn't suggest planting anything now as you will have a much harder time keeping things alive due to high water requirements - wait until September.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
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Ottawa
Make sure you read and understand the implications of your city's tree bylaw before making any decisions. You may regret the control they will exercise over YOUR trees in years to come.
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
teoconca wrote:
Jun 25th, 2018 1:14 pm
Don't plant them too near to the house.
Also, don't plant them too close to the fence.
Sr. Member
Feb 26, 2016
580 posts
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I think it's a good idea to plant early on. for shrubs, I really like boxwood (either green mountain or green velvet) for hedging and cedar globes. i found that both grow relatively slowly and don't require too much maintenance. for trees, i planted a magnolia in my backyard.

i live in Vaughan and bought most of my plants from terra. they are having their garden event special now which I find pretty good. 30% off jun 21-27, 40% off jun 28-jul 4 and 50% off jul 5-18

https://www.terragreenhouses.com/specials/
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Jun 12, 2008
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Ancaster
Here are some of the trees and shrubs we have at our house that have done well. They all seem to be hardier than average and disease resistant.

Hicks Yew
Spreading Yew
Serbian Spruce
Bakers Blue Spruce
Paperbark Maple
Gingko Biloba Tree (slow growing smaller variety)
Redbud (can be pruned to look like bush or tree)
Emerald Cedar
Boxwood
Purple Fountain Beech
Dawyck Purple Beech
Nest Blue Spruce
Member
Dec 25, 2012
302 posts
35 upvotes
Toronto
nielboy wrote:
Jun 26th, 2018 1:20 pm
Here are some of the trees and shrubs we have at our house that have done well. They all seem to be hardier than average and disease resistant.

Hicks Yew
Spreading Yew
Serbian Spruce
Bakers Blue Spruce
Paperbark Maple
Gingko Biloba Tree (slow growing smaller variety)
Redbud (can be pruned to look like bush or tree)
Emerald Cedar
Boxwood
Purple Fountain Beech
Dawyck Purple Beech
Nest Blue Spruce
Wow! Pictures? That's alot of variety, is your lot huge?
JS
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Oct 23, 2008
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Toronto (Markham)
Nothing too close to the house or property/fence line. Rule of thumb for trees, the root system will be nearly twice the size of the tree canopy. Be aware the rapid growth and overall height of the tree at maturity. Maples can grow fast and reach 40 to 50ft depending on species (in fact, I'd avoid maples). Personally I'd stick to dwarf varieties, 20ft high is enough for me.
Tis banana is IRIE :razz:

10% off is cold, 50% off is warm, 75% off is hot, but FREE IS RFD!
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Jun 12, 2008
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Ancaster
James Stonehenge wrote:
Jun 26th, 2018 9:26 pm
Wow! Pictures? That's alot of variety, is your lot huge?
I'm out of town but can post some pictures when I get back.

We're in a subdivision lot, but it's a decent size.
Member
Nov 17, 2014
497 posts
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Ontario
Couple things we planted here this year. Our backyard is 30x45 so we try to stick with narrow columnar trees. I will add a couple pics.

First picture, conifer on the right is a Weeping White Spruce (Picea Glauca Pendula). They grow to 20 ft but stay very narrow at 5 ft in width so great for small yards. Need to have some evergreens for winter interest and also better for year round screening.

Second picture is 'Green Pillar' Oak. Got a couple of them because they start narrow but get quite tall. We have a 3 storey condo that can see over our yard so we wanted something that would grow quite quick and tall vertically but not take over the yard. They get to 50 ft tall and 15 ft in width. Also they don't drop their leaves until the spring which is good for screening purposes. Yes it is close to the fence but they have a narrow upright habitat, no real "neighbors" on the other side except for a patch of grass then a parking lot.

Other than that we have a lot of emerald cedars which I wish I did some more research in because they dont get overly tall (which you might like) but moreso they don't take well to heavy snow which can splay them wide open. If I could go back in time I would've bought DeGroots Spire Cedar which are similar to emeralds but they handle snow better and get taller. Previous owners planted a flowering almond tree which is a beautiful small tree but they dont live long, a Bartlett Pear tree which is also a nice small tree but wasps can be a problem, weeping Mulberry Tree and a Purple Leaf Sandcherry which can be seen in the first picture.
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Jun 12, 2008
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Ancaster
Here are some pics of our landscaping plants I mentioned. You should google photos of them so you can see them up close in different settings and know how big or small they grown.
We also have a Norway Maple in the front yard that was planted by the city...it's massive now. We also have a Mountain Ash & Chanticleer Ornamental Pear tree in the back yard. Both are great specimen trees.
Hope this helps.

Hicks Yew (we've got them all over my yard)
Image

Spreading Yew
Image

Serbian Spruce (the greener looking one - we have three of them)
Bakers Blue Spruce ( the bluer one - doesn't grown as big as some of the other spruces like the Colorado Blue Spruce you can see in my neighbour's yard)
Image

Paperbark Maple ( the small tree next to the road drain)
Image

Gingko Biloba Tree (slow growing smaller variety - we liked this one better looking like a bush)
Boxwood (small one sitting next to the Gingko)
Image

Redbud (can be pruned to look like bush or tree)
Image

Emerald Cedar (these are great landscaping options but very common in most yards)
Image
Image

Purple Fountain Beech (the little guy in the foreground - he was just planted last year)
Image

Dawyck Upright Pyramidal Purple Beech
Image

Nest Blue Spruce
Image

Weeping Crimson Birch (Another one we have that I love)
Image
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Aug 10, 2011
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Good lord, your house and landscaping is beautiful.
:confused:

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