Automotive

Trolley jack not lifting vehicle high enough off the ground

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  • Sep 16th, 2015 9:26 am
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[OP]
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Feb 23, 2008
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Brampton

Trolley jack not lifting vehicle high enough off the ground

I have a hydraulic trolley jack from CT. It lifts high enough for cars, not high enough for suv. What can I put the jack on to build up the lifting height? I just want to take off the tire, not lift the whole front or rear end.
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9 replies
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
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cheapmeister wrote:
Sep 15th, 2015 4:54 pm
I have a hydraulic trolley jack from CT. It lifts high enough for cars, not high enough for suv. What can I put the jack on to build up the lifting height? I just want to take off the tire, not lift the whole front or rear end.
Is the pinch weld too high as well? Check the weight capacity as well.
[OP]
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Feb 23, 2008
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Kasakato wrote:
Sep 15th, 2015 4:57 pm
Is the pinch weld too high as well? Check the weight capacity as well.
Jack says it can lift 2 tonnes. Yea the pinch weld or jacking point is high.
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Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2008
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Time to get a new floor jack that lifts higher.

Putting something underneath the jack (like a wooden block) would be dangerous. If it slips, you could damage the car/suv, or hurt yourself. Not worth the risk. Just get a better jack.
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Oct 26, 2008
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BC
Although a jack with a greater lifting height is the preferred way,

depending on what surface you are working on and whether you have some suitable lumber lying around, you could assemble a temporary "sub-floor".
That is, not an individual wooden block under the jack, but something like four or five 4' long pieces of 2x8 placed next to each other to form a 4 foot square pad.
That will allow the jack to operate just like it does normally - the wheels can move a bit as needed to adjust the angle as the vehicle rises, and the load is evenly distributed over the pad.
Only gives you an extra 1.5" but that might be all you need. If more height needed, you would have to use 4x4 lumber instead of 2x8.
Do this only if you have good pieces of lumber that butt together nicely and sit firmly on the ground.
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Oct 11, 2008
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Mississauga
multimut wrote:
Sep 15th, 2015 8:34 pm


Putting something underneath the jack (like a wooden block) would be dangerous. If it slips, you could damage the car/suv, or hurt yourself. Not worth the risk. Just get a better jack.
lol noob. dont waste your money on a new jack if youre just using a jack once a year to change out tires. i hope u have a wheel chalk and a jack stand

u can find a long 4x4 peice of wood and lift your car on one side
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Aug 29, 2011
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Mississauga
I have the same issue with my wife's minivan. I use a scrap 2x4 between the jack and the lift point on the van. Gains me an extra 1.5".
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Jun 12, 2007
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Can't you just lift using a suitable lower spot under the truck like under the control arm or shock mount/rear axle?
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Sep 8, 2007
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Way Out of GTA
I put 4 foot long 2x10" wooden planks underneath. Either 2 or 3 planks screwed together...gives me a stable base and the 5" or so of additional lift I needed for the MDX. Once lifted I put some 6x6 wooden blocks near the jack point as a backup. The planks also save your driveway from the jack wheels digging in.

It's good to not max out the jack height as you may find you can take the wheel off BUT when you go to put the other one on you need additional lift...now what? I've had to do a back up jack on planks to give me the additional lift so I can get the wheel on then let the car down.

PS...If you are lifting an SUV make sure you aren't overloading your jack with the weight. Try and have a 3 ton and up rating. Use a jack rated for the weight!

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